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Moore lost to Democratic candidate Doug Jones. After graduating from the University of Alabama Law School , he joined the Etowah County district attorney's office, serving as an assistant district attorney from to In he was appointed as a circuit judge by Governor Guy Hunt to fill a vacancy, and elected to the position at the end of the term.

Moore was removed from his position in November by the Alabama Court of the Judiciary for refusing a federal court 's order to remove a marble monument of the Ten Commandments that he had placed in the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building. Moore sought the Republican nomination for the governorship of Alabama in and , but lost in the primaries. Moore was again elected Chief Justice in , but was suspended in May , for defying a U. Supreme Court decision about same-sex marriage.

Moore resigned in April , and in September was nominated for the U. Senate seat vacated by Jeff Sessions. During this special election campaign for U. Senate, public allegations of sexual misconduct were made against him.

Democrat Doug Jones won the election, becoming the first Democrat since to win a U. Senate seat in Alabama. Moore is considered an advocate of far-right politics. Moore was the oldest of five children. While growing up, he had two brothers and two sisters. In , the Moores relocated to Houston , Texas , the site of a postwar building boom. After about four years, they returned to Alabama, then moved to Pennsylvania , and then returned permanently to Alabama.

Moore attended his freshman year of high school at Gallant near Gadsden, and transferred to Etowah County High School for his final three years, graduating in Representative Albert Rains , and after confirmation of that nomination by incoming Republican Representative James D. He graduated in with a Bachelor of Science degree. With the Vietnam War underway, Moore served in several posts as a military police officer, including Fort Benning, Georgia , and Illesheim , Germany , before being deployed to the Republic of Vietnam.

Serving as the commander of th Military Police Company of the th Military Police Battalion, [25] Moore was perceived to be reckless, but very strict. He insisted his troops salute him on the battlefield, despite official training which discourages such behavior because salutes can identify an officer to enemy targeting.

This role earned him enemies, and in his autobiography he recalls sleeping on sandbags to avoid a grenade or bomb being tossed under his cot, as many of his men had threatened him with fragging. Moore was discharged from the United States Army as a captain in , and was admitted to the University of Alabama School of Law that same year. Professors and fellow students held him in low regard due to his incapacity for keen analysis.

Moore soon moved to the district attorney's office, working as the first full-time prosecutor in Etowah County. During his tenure there, Moore was investigated by the state bar for "suspect conduct" after convening a grand jury to examine what he perceived to have been funding shortages in the sheriff 's office.

Several weeks after the state bar investigation was dismissed as unfounded, Moore quit his prosecuting position to run as a Democrat for the county's circuit-court judge seat in The election was bitter, with Moore alleging that cases were being delayed in exchange for payoffs. The allegations were never substantiated.

Moore overwhelmingly lost the Democratic runoff primary to fellow attorney Donald Stewart, whom Moore described as "an honorable man for whom I have much respect, who eventually became a close friend". Moore left Gadsden shortly thereafter to live for a year in Australia. In Australia, a country Moore said later he had wanted to visit after his service in Vietnam but was unable to at the time, he went to Queensland.

From the state capital, Brisbane , he first went to Ayr and helped with the sugar cane harvest, then inland to what is now the Central Highlands Region , where he fulfilled his longtime desire to see the Outback , eventually working at the Telemon ranch near Springsure , a town where many residents are devout Christians.

One of them, the Rolfe family, ran Telemon, and spoke highly of Moore to The Guardian in , "I don't think he'd ever done that sort of manual labor in his life," said Isla Turner, daughter of Colin Rolfe, who had taken Moore in, "but he took to it like a duck to water".

Moore returned to Gadsden in , and at that time married Kayla Kisor. He ran in for Etowah County's district attorney position against fellow Democrat Jimmy Hedgspeth. Losing once more, Moore returned to private practice in the city.

In , Moore switched his affiliation to the GOP. Guy Hunt was charged with making an appointment until the next election. Moore's name was floated by some of his associates, and a background check was initiated with several state and county agencies, including the Etowah County district attorney's office.

Moore's former political opponent Jimmy Hedgspeth, who still helmed the D. He was the first county-wide Republican to win since Reconstruction. During Moore's tenure as circuit judge, he hung a homemade wooden Ten Commandments plaque on the wall of his courtroom behind his bench. He stated that it was not his intention to generate controversy. He told the Atlantic that he understood the potential for controversy existed, but "I wanted to establish the moral foundation of our law.

While Moore presided over a murder case shortly after his appointment, the defendant's attorney objected to the plaque.

This attracted the attention of critics who also objected to Moore's practice of opening court sessions with a prayer beseeching divine guidance for jurors in their deliberations. In at least one case, Moore asked a clergyman to lead the court's jury pool in prayer. Although the organization did not immediately file suit, Moore decried the action as an "act of intimidation" in a post-trial press conference. The incident drew additional attention to Moore while he was campaigning to hold onto his circuit court seat.

In that year's election, Moore won the seat in a landslide victory over attorney Keith Pitts, who had unsuccessfully prosecuted the "Silk and Satin" murder case.

In March , the ACLU filed a lawsuit against Moore, stating that the pre-court session prayers and the Ten Commandments display were both unconstitutional.

This original lawsuit was eventually dismissed for technical reasons, but Governor Fob James instructed state Attorney General Bill Pryor to file suit in Montgomery County in support of Moore. The case was tried before state Circuit Judge Charles Price, who in declared the prayers unconstitutional but initially allowed the Ten Commandments plaque to remain on the courtroom walls.

Immediately after the ruling, Moore held a press conference vowing to defy the ruling against pre-session prayers and affirming a religious intent in displaying the plaque. Critics responded by asking Price to reconsider his previous ruling, and the judge issued a new ruling requiring the Ten Commandments plaque to be removed in ten days.

Moore appealed Price's decision and kept the plaque up; ten days later the Supreme Court of Alabama issued a temporary stay against the ruling. The Court never ruled in the case, throwing it out for technical reasons in Moore said that he was hesitant to make the statewide race because he had "absolutely no funds" and three other candidates, particularly Associate Justice Harold See , were well-financed.

Nevertheless, on December 7, , Moore announced from his Etowah County courtroom that he would enter the race with the hope of returning "God to our public life and restore the moral foundation of our law".

His campaign, centered on religious issues, arguing that Christianity's declining influence "corresponded directly with school violence, homosexuality, and crime". Associate Justice Harold See was the heavy favorite to win the Republican nomination because of his support from the state business community and the party hierarchy, including Chief Justice Hooper. Despite Rove's support and significantly more campaign funding, See lost the primary to Moore.

Moore was sworn in as Chief Justice on January 15, Martin, who had appointed Moore to West Point years earlier, was among the dignitaries in attendance.

On taking the position, Moore said that he had "come to realize the real meaning of the First Amendment and its relationship to the God on whom the oath was based. My mind had been opened to the spiritual war occurring in our state and our nation that was slowly removing the knowledge of that relationship between God and law.

I pledged to support not only the U. Constitution, but the Alabama Constitution as well, which provided in its preamble that the state 'established justice' by 'invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God. A month after his election, Moore began making plans for a larger monument to the Ten Commandments, reasoning that the Heflin-Torbert Judicial Building required something grander than a wooden plaque.

High-grade granite from Vermont was ordered and shipped, and Moore found benefactors and a sculptor to complete the job. On the evening of July 31, , despite some initial installation difficulties and concerns regarding structural support for the monument's weight, Moore had the completed monument transported to the building and installed in the rotunda. The installation was filmed, and videotapes of the event were sold by Coral Ridge Ministries , an evangelical media outlet in Fort Lauderdale, Florida , which later used proceeds from the sales of the film to underwrite Moore's ensuing legal expenses.

Coral Ridge was the operation of the late televangelist Reverend D. James Kennedy , [36] a staunch Moore supporter. The next morning, Moore held a press conference in the rotunda to publicly unveil the monument. In a speech following the unveiling, Moore declared, "Today a cry has gone out across our land for the acknowledgment of that God upon whom this nation and our laws were founded May this day mark the restoration of the moral foundation of law to our people and the return to the knowledge of God in our land.

The trial, titled Glassroth v. Moore , began on October 15, Evidence for the plaintiffs included testimony that lawyers of different religious beliefs had changed their work practices, including routinely avoiding visiting the court building to avoid passing by the monument, and testimony that the monument created a religious atmosphere, with many people using the area for prayer. Moore argued that he would not remove the monument, as doing so would violate his oath of office:.

On this note, Moore said that the Ten Commandments are the "moral foundation" of U. Additionally, Moore acknowledged an explicit theistic intent in placing the monument, agreeing that the monument "reflects the sovereignty of God over the affairs of men" and "acknowledge[s] God's overruling power over the affairs of men". On November 18, , federal U.

District Judge Myron Herbert Thompson issued his ruling declaring that the monument violated the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and was thus unconstitutional:. If all Chief Justice Moore had done were to emphasize the Ten Commandments' historical and educational importance But the Chief Justice did not limit himself to this; he went far, far beyond.

He installed a two-and-a-half ton monument in the most prominent place in a government building, managed with dollars from all state taxpayers, with the specific purpose and effect of establishing a permanent recognition of the 'sovereignty of God,' the Judeo-Christian God, over all citizens in this country, regardless of each taxpaying citizen's individual personal beliefs or lack thereof.

To this, the Establishment Clause says no. Judge Thompson's decision mandated that Moore remove the monument from the state judicial building by January 3, , but stayed this order on December 23, , after Moore appealed the decision to the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.

This appeal was argued on June 4, , before a three-judge panel in Atlanta , Georgia. On July 1, , the panel issued a ruling upholding the lower court's decision, agreeing that "the monument fails two of Lemon 's three prongs. It violates the Establishment Clause. In response to the appeals court's decision, Judge Thompson lifted his stay on August 5, , requiring Moore to have the monument removed from public areas of the state judicial building by August On August 14, Moore announced his intention to defy Judge Thompson's order to have the monument removed.

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Supreme Court decision about same-sex marriage. Moore resigned in April , and in September was nominated for the U. Senate seat vacated by Jeff Sessions. During this special election campaign for U. Senate, public allegations of sexual misconduct were made against him. Democrat Doug Jones won the election, becoming the first Democrat since to win a U.

Senate seat in Alabama. Moore is considered an advocate of far-right politics. Moore was the oldest of five children. While growing up, he had two brothers and two sisters. In , the Moores relocated to Houston , Texas , the site of a postwar building boom. After about four years, they returned to Alabama, then moved to Pennsylvania , and then returned permanently to Alabama. Moore attended his freshman year of high school at Gallant near Gadsden, and transferred to Etowah County High School for his final three years, graduating in Representative Albert Rains , and after confirmation of that nomination by incoming Republican Representative James D.

He graduated in with a Bachelor of Science degree. With the Vietnam War underway, Moore served in several posts as a military police officer, including Fort Benning, Georgia , and Illesheim , Germany , before being deployed to the Republic of Vietnam.

Serving as the commander of th Military Police Company of the th Military Police Battalion, [25] Moore was perceived to be reckless, but very strict. He insisted his troops salute him on the battlefield, despite official training which discourages such behavior because salutes can identify an officer to enemy targeting. This role earned him enemies, and in his autobiography he recalls sleeping on sandbags to avoid a grenade or bomb being tossed under his cot, as many of his men had threatened him with fragging.

Moore was discharged from the United States Army as a captain in , and was admitted to the University of Alabama School of Law that same year. Professors and fellow students held him in low regard due to his incapacity for keen analysis.

Moore soon moved to the district attorney's office, working as the first full-time prosecutor in Etowah County. During his tenure there, Moore was investigated by the state bar for "suspect conduct" after convening a grand jury to examine what he perceived to have been funding shortages in the sheriff 's office.

Several weeks after the state bar investigation was dismissed as unfounded, Moore quit his prosecuting position to run as a Democrat for the county's circuit-court judge seat in The election was bitter, with Moore alleging that cases were being delayed in exchange for payoffs.

The allegations were never substantiated. Moore overwhelmingly lost the Democratic runoff primary to fellow attorney Donald Stewart, whom Moore described as "an honorable man for whom I have much respect, who eventually became a close friend".

Moore left Gadsden shortly thereafter to live for a year in Australia. In Australia, a country Moore said later he had wanted to visit after his service in Vietnam but was unable to at the time, he went to Queensland. From the state capital, Brisbane , he first went to Ayr and helped with the sugar cane harvest, then inland to what is now the Central Highlands Region , where he fulfilled his longtime desire to see the Outback , eventually working at the Telemon ranch near Springsure , a town where many residents are devout Christians.

One of them, the Rolfe family, ran Telemon, and spoke highly of Moore to The Guardian in , "I don't think he'd ever done that sort of manual labor in his life," said Isla Turner, daughter of Colin Rolfe, who had taken Moore in, "but he took to it like a duck to water". Moore returned to Gadsden in , and at that time married Kayla Kisor. He ran in for Etowah County's district attorney position against fellow Democrat Jimmy Hedgspeth.

Losing once more, Moore returned to private practice in the city. In , Moore switched his affiliation to the GOP. Guy Hunt was charged with making an appointment until the next election. Moore's name was floated by some of his associates, and a background check was initiated with several state and county agencies, including the Etowah County district attorney's office.

Moore's former political opponent Jimmy Hedgspeth, who still helmed the D. He was the first county-wide Republican to win since Reconstruction. During Moore's tenure as circuit judge, he hung a homemade wooden Ten Commandments plaque on the wall of his courtroom behind his bench. He stated that it was not his intention to generate controversy.

He told the Atlantic that he understood the potential for controversy existed, but "I wanted to establish the moral foundation of our law. While Moore presided over a murder case shortly after his appointment, the defendant's attorney objected to the plaque. This attracted the attention of critics who also objected to Moore's practice of opening court sessions with a prayer beseeching divine guidance for jurors in their deliberations.

In at least one case, Moore asked a clergyman to lead the court's jury pool in prayer. Although the organization did not immediately file suit, Moore decried the action as an "act of intimidation" in a post-trial press conference. The incident drew additional attention to Moore while he was campaigning to hold onto his circuit court seat. In that year's election, Moore won the seat in a landslide victory over attorney Keith Pitts, who had unsuccessfully prosecuted the "Silk and Satin" murder case.

In March , the ACLU filed a lawsuit against Moore, stating that the pre-court session prayers and the Ten Commandments display were both unconstitutional.

This original lawsuit was eventually dismissed for technical reasons, but Governor Fob James instructed state Attorney General Bill Pryor to file suit in Montgomery County in support of Moore. The case was tried before state Circuit Judge Charles Price, who in declared the prayers unconstitutional but initially allowed the Ten Commandments plaque to remain on the courtroom walls.

Immediately after the ruling, Moore held a press conference vowing to defy the ruling against pre-session prayers and affirming a religious intent in displaying the plaque.

Critics responded by asking Price to reconsider his previous ruling, and the judge issued a new ruling requiring the Ten Commandments plaque to be removed in ten days. Moore appealed Price's decision and kept the plaque up; ten days later the Supreme Court of Alabama issued a temporary stay against the ruling.

The Court never ruled in the case, throwing it out for technical reasons in Moore said that he was hesitant to make the statewide race because he had "absolutely no funds" and three other candidates, particularly Associate Justice Harold See , were well-financed.

Nevertheless, on December 7, , Moore announced from his Etowah County courtroom that he would enter the race with the hope of returning "God to our public life and restore the moral foundation of our law". His campaign, centered on religious issues, arguing that Christianity's declining influence "corresponded directly with school violence, homosexuality, and crime". Associate Justice Harold See was the heavy favorite to win the Republican nomination because of his support from the state business community and the party hierarchy, including Chief Justice Hooper.

Despite Rove's support and significantly more campaign funding, See lost the primary to Moore. Moore was sworn in as Chief Justice on January 15, Martin, who had appointed Moore to West Point years earlier, was among the dignitaries in attendance. On taking the position, Moore said that he had "come to realize the real meaning of the First Amendment and its relationship to the God on whom the oath was based. My mind had been opened to the spiritual war occurring in our state and our nation that was slowly removing the knowledge of that relationship between God and law.

I pledged to support not only the U. Constitution, but the Alabama Constitution as well, which provided in its preamble that the state 'established justice' by 'invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God. A month after his election, Moore began making plans for a larger monument to the Ten Commandments, reasoning that the Heflin-Torbert Judicial Building required something grander than a wooden plaque. High-grade granite from Vermont was ordered and shipped, and Moore found benefactors and a sculptor to complete the job.

On the evening of July 31, , despite some initial installation difficulties and concerns regarding structural support for the monument's weight, Moore had the completed monument transported to the building and installed in the rotunda. The installation was filmed, and videotapes of the event were sold by Coral Ridge Ministries , an evangelical media outlet in Fort Lauderdale, Florida , which later used proceeds from the sales of the film to underwrite Moore's ensuing legal expenses.

Coral Ridge was the operation of the late televangelist Reverend D. James Kennedy , [36] a staunch Moore supporter. The next morning, Moore held a press conference in the rotunda to publicly unveil the monument. In a speech following the unveiling, Moore declared, "Today a cry has gone out across our land for the acknowledgment of that God upon whom this nation and our laws were founded May this day mark the restoration of the moral foundation of law to our people and the return to the knowledge of God in our land.

The trial, titled Glassroth v. Moore , began on October 15, Evidence for the plaintiffs included testimony that lawyers of different religious beliefs had changed their work practices, including routinely avoiding visiting the court building to avoid passing by the monument, and testimony that the monument created a religious atmosphere, with many people using the area for prayer.

Moore argued that he would not remove the monument, as doing so would violate his oath of office:. On this note, Moore said that the Ten Commandments are the "moral foundation" of U. Additionally, Moore acknowledged an explicit theistic intent in placing the monument, agreeing that the monument "reflects the sovereignty of God over the affairs of men" and "acknowledge[s] God's overruling power over the affairs of men".

On November 18, , federal U. District Judge Myron Herbert Thompson issued his ruling declaring that the monument violated the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and was thus unconstitutional:. If all Chief Justice Moore had done were to emphasize the Ten Commandments' historical and educational importance But the Chief Justice did not limit himself to this; he went far, far beyond.

He installed a two-and-a-half ton monument in the most prominent place in a government building, managed with dollars from all state taxpayers, with the specific purpose and effect of establishing a permanent recognition of the 'sovereignty of God,' the Judeo-Christian God, over all citizens in this country, regardless of each taxpaying citizen's individual personal beliefs or lack thereof.

To this, the Establishment Clause says no. Judge Thompson's decision mandated that Moore remove the monument from the state judicial building by January 3, , but stayed this order on December 23, , after Moore appealed the decision to the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. This appeal was argued on June 4, , before a three-judge panel in Atlanta , Georgia.

On July 1, , the panel issued a ruling upholding the lower court's decision, agreeing that "the monument fails two of Lemon 's three prongs.

It violates the Establishment Clause. In response to the appeals court's decision, Judge Thompson lifted his stay on August 5, , requiring Moore to have the monument removed from public areas of the state judicial building by August On August 14, Moore announced his intention to defy Judge Thompson's order to have the monument removed. Two days later, large rallies in support of Moore and the Ten Commandments monument formed in front of the judicial building, featuring speakers such as Alan Keyes , the Reverend Jerry Falwell , and Moore himself.

The crowd peaked at an estimated count of 4, that day, [43] and anywhere from several hundred to over a thousand protesters remained through the end of August. The time limit for removal expired on August 20, with the monument still in place in the building's rotunda. In response, the eight other members of the Alabama Supreme Court intervened on August 21, unanimously overruled Moore, and ordered the removal of the monument. Moore said that Thompson, "fearing that I would not obey his order, decided to threaten other state officials and force them to remove the monument if I did not do so.

A threat of heavy fines was his way of coercing obedience to that order," an action that Moore saw as a violation of the Eleventh Amendment to the United States Constitution.

On August 27, the monument was moved to a non-public side room in the judicial building. The monument was not actually removed from the state judicial building until July 19, On August 22, , two days after the deadline for the Ten Commandments monument's removal had passed, the Alabama Judicial Inquiry Commission JIC filed a complaint with the Alabama Court of the Judiciary COJ , a panel of judges, lawyers and others appointed variously by judges, legal leaders, the governor and the lieutenant governor.

The COJ ethics hearing was held on November 12, Moore repeated his earlier sentiment that "to acknowledge God cannot be a violation of the Canons of Ethics.

Without God there can be no ethics. What message does that send to the public, to other litigants? The message it sends is: If you don't like a court order, you don't have to follow it. A special panel of retired judges and justices was randomly selected to hear the case.

Moore argued that the COJ did not consider the underlying legality of the federal courts' order that the monument be removed from the courthouse. The Alabama Supreme Court rejected this argument, saying that the COJ did not have the authority to overrule the federal courts, only to determine whether Moore violated the Canons of Judicial Ethics. Therefore, the Court reasoned, it was enough to show that a procedurally-valid order was in place against Moore.

The court also upheld the sanction of removal as appropriate. Moore sought to return to the bench, and in the March Republican primary for chief justice of Alabama, Moore won the Republican nomination, defeating the sitting Chief Justice Chuck Malone who had been appointed by Governor Bentley the previous year and Mobile County Circuit Judge Charles Graddick.

On January 28, , the Southern Poverty Law Center filed a judicial ethics complaint against Moore, stating that he had publicly commented on pending same-sex marriage cases and encouraged state officials and judges to ignore federal court rulings overturning bans on same-sex marriage. Moore issued an order to probate judges and their employees on February 8, the day before a federal court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage in Alabama was set to take effect, ordering them to disregard the ruling and enforce the state's ban under threat of legal action by the governor.

On January 6, , after the U. Supreme Court issued its opinion in Obergefell v. Hodges the previous June, Moore issued an administrative order to lower court judges stating, "until further decision by the Alabama Supreme Court, the existing orders of the Alabama Supreme Court that Alabama probate judges have a ministerial duty not to issue any marriage license contrary to the Alabama Sanctity of Marriage Amendment or the Alabama Marriage Protection Act remain in full force and effect.

Moore faced removal from office over the charges, which were more serious than those which removed him from office in Judicial Inquiry Commission , alleging that his automatic suspension was unconstitutional.

In June , Moore filed a motion to dismiss the JIC proceedings, arguing, among other things, that the JIC and Alabama Court of the Judiciary lacked jurisdiction to review Administrative Orders that he issued and that the orders of the Alabama Supreme Court were still in effect from the Alabama Policy Institute proceedings prohibiting the issuance of same-sex marriage licenses by probate judges in Alabama, despite the rulings in Obergefell v.

Hodges issued by the U. Supreme Court , Searcy v. Strange , Strawser v. They simply have not looked at women with the same open eye that they view men. But Price Waterhouse had the lowest numbers of the group. None concerned the business she had generated or the clients she had managed. They were only about her interpersonal skills.

Back in Washington, she arranged a meeting with Tom Beyer, head partner of OGS and her chief champion, to discuss how to best position her candidacy. Four months later, Hopkins learned that two of the OGS partners who previously had supported her partnership had changed their minds. Meanwhile, the men who had been placed on hold along with Hopkins fared much better. Fifteen out of the nineteen were promoted to partner that year. Hopkins contacted a friend who gave her a list of attorneys, and she soon met with Doug Huron.

Still, Huron learned enough to conclude that Hopkins had experienced discrimination. Doug Huron hedged his bets. He filed a lawsuit in DC Superior Court alleging violations of the local law against sex discrimination while also filing a charge with the EEOC to preserve the right to eventually file a Title VII lawsuit in federal court. Only then could she quit and still be treated, by law, as if she had been fired—which would entitle her to recover damages for losing her job.

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Nov 09,  · ATLANTA — Republicans in Washington seemed near panic Thursday in the light of a news report in which four women said Roy S. Moore, the Republican nominee for . Ann Hopkins was an attorney who bravely pursued a landmark American employment discrimination case after being denied partnership at a law firm for her gender. Told she was “overly aggressive, unduly harsh, difficult to work with,” and “needed a course in charm school,” Ann fought back by. Local College and high school football, basketball, baseball, for North Florida and South Georgia.