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Letters to the Editor. Magnificent as always, congratulations, thanks a lot Mimi…. Is there a way I could volunteer or help? Let me know and thank you for all your hard work. The great majority must labor at something productive. A Childhood Search for Hispanic Pride. My paternal grandfather was an umpire in the Mexican League and an avid baseball fan.

People called him "El Oso" because he had hair all over his body; he had to shave every day around his wrists, around his neck, and around his chest, to appear presentable. They said that when he walked barefooted, he never left a footprint. I understand from my grandfather that when he was younger, he was a very good pitcher.

In , Alan M. There is an interesting photo of him with the La Junta team. He was 22 years old! I knew that Mr. We lived at the corner of Zaragoza and Santa Ursula. Then, in the same year, he played with the Mexico City Aztecs, the number one semi-pro team in Mexico. The following year, in , he played in San Antonio with the Mexican Nationals before moving to Laredo the next year.

Of the six pitchers that year, Mr. He also led the team with three shutouts. And, I wanted to see if there were any Latinos in the major leagues. I looked at these baseball cards almost on a daily basis. They were my heroes. Among the baseball players of the s and the s, Ted Williams was one of my favorites. During the season, he finished with a. The Red Sox hired him as their hitting coach after he retired Many historians and preservationists have distinct childhood memories of connecting with the past, finding cultural artifacts, and discovering a historic building.

Well, this moment was also one of those memories. I was seven years old and on an elementary school field trip to the local history museum in my Texas hometown. It was my first experience inside a museum, and I explored the dark, mysterious building, eagerly searching for a part of history that resonated with me. At every turn, I kept looking for something that reflected who I was, but ultimately I walked out confused. I liked the museum, but I wanted to love the museum. My parents—like so many new immigrants to the United States—had educated their children, first-generation Mexican-Americans, about their homeland.

I was taught about our shared heritage and that Texas, among other states, had once been a part of Mexico. But I noticed a conspicuous absence among the exhibits that day. Where were all the Mexicans? Through donated items, my hometown museum had built an interpretation only of the Anglo pioneer settlement experience. I am an outsider. It not only helped shape me personally, but also influences the work I do and want to do.

Since starting at the National Trust one year ago, I have frequently been asked, "How can we work with our Latino communities? I can't say for certain, but what I do know is that Latino heritage is significantly under-represented within our traditional preservation framework, and there is much work to be done. As a field officer at the Trust, I aid this effort by saving America's national treasures and advocating for the preservation and inclusion of under-represented communities with an emphasis on Latino heritage.

While a number of veteranos respected veterans have tirelessly worked for decades advocating for Latino inclusion, many of us are newer to the mission. A Latino preservation stakeholder group—Latinos in Heritage Conservation—emerged in , advocating for the preservation of Latino history, culture, and places. And there are other organizations doing the important work of documenting the contributions of Latinos: In Texas, Refusing to Forget is bringing to light the sanctioned anti-Mexican borderland violence during the 20th century through a powerful museum exhibit and through Texas State Historical Marker nominations.

During a city visit in the field, I met an Anglo colleague doing an exceptional job of working with Latinos to preserve and interpret Latino heritage. What was their secret for success? They invited the Latino community not only to join, but also to lead!

That is the key to making these projects effective: They have to either be led by Latinos or be community-based projects that include Latino stakeholders every step of the way. In sum, if we wish to have a future with greater meaning, we must concern ourselves not only with the historic highlights, but we must be concerned with the total heritage of the nation and all that is worth preserving from our past as a living part of the present.

The National Historic Preservation Act of was passed to prevent the loss of heritage deeply valued by the citizens of our nation. How do you work with Latino communities? Latinos, how can we better integrate this work into your communities? Be a Partner in Preservation of National Parks. Below is an extract from an article that was published in Somos Primos, February The intent was to promote our ancestral connections to national parks.

It was published in Madrid by Editora Nacional. The Appendix which follows is entitled: To read the full article Cut and paste. A few courageous soldiers, priests and colonists spread Spanish Dominions from Arkansas to Peru and left a heritage of culture which still flourishes in the South West and in countries south of the United States. De Soto ranks with Pizarro and Cortes amongst the great explorers. Although his last expedition failed, it explored 4, miles of wilderness and traversed the territories occupied by ten States of the Union.

Eleven national monuments or historic sites in the custody of the National Park Service are linked to Spanish activities in the United States and one of its dependencies. Out of the 20 sites being recognized for a possible grant with a historic Spanish connection, only two on this list are included: Hopefully next year, we can promote the inclusion of all eleven of these.

De Soto National Memorial, in Bradenton, Florida, commemorates the explorers prodigious march through unexplored and inhospitable regions.

It lasted four years, during which De Soto journeyed with his men through more than 4, miles of forest and wilderness. Fort Caroline, Florida, is a commemorative monument principally related to the passage of the French through this region. It also signalizes Spanish military actions; for that reason it is included here. Fort Frederica National Monument, in Georgia , commemorates the struggles among Spain, France, and England for pos-session of this region.

The Fort of Matanzas , a national monument, is a small fortress not far from St. Protected by this fort, the Spaniards here destroyed the French who threatened them. Augustine to defend the city and protect the ships that sailed along the Gulf Stream on their way to and from Mexico, loaded with merchandise and traveling between Spanish and Caribbean ports while exposed to the attacks of English pirates.

In this fortress, since November 9,, the flag of Spain again flies alongside the flag of the United States. It was declared a national monument in to preserve the inscriptions by Spanish and other explorers on its rocky walls. Tumacacori National Monument, Arizona, commemorates another Spanish mission. Become a Part of the Forum Community Forum is a community composed of preservation thought leaders—and members' voices profoundly influence and shape the preservation movement.

Forum provides and curates cutting-edge content, offers online and in-person networking opportunities, and brings diverse new perspectives to the discussion to provide you with the edge in your day-to-day efforts, but it is your participation in Forum that increases the effectiveness of this national network. Now more than ever, we need to stay connected, continue learning, and expand our work as preservationists. Your involvement is key to strengthening the preservation movement, so become part of the Preservation Leadership Forum community today.

I look forward to your participation in the coming year! If you'd like to sample Forum membership before committing, I encourage you to take advantage of our special offer by downloading Looking Forward: Use preservation50 code to access the members-only Journal. Or watch the TrustLive videos from last year's PastForward Conference to get a taste of the content that Forum is producing. Individually we are preservationists. Together we are Forum. Latinos are a driving political and economic force in the United States.

The Mayflower Compact — the first Dream Act. During the period of —, thousands of English-speaking people immigrated to America. In consequence, they settled the first permanent English Colony in located in an area that is now modern-day Plymouth, Massachusetts.

To escape such persecution, their journey was not necessarily a direct trip from England to Massachusetts. Rather, many had moved to The Netherlands before boarding the Mayflower and making their way to America. Either they stayed in Europe under increasing brutality, or they took flight to America.

Many opted to seek the latter. More than likely, the frightened souls were plunged into a tempest of emotions. Fear, pain, heartache, and hunger were present most of the days and nights. Alas, as happens during voluntary or forced mass migrations, some never fulfilled that shared dream, because they lost their lives along the way.

However, constant prayer must have also assured these spirited folks renewed faith and hope toward the future and a better life.

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