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They lived happily in it for over 25 years. And since then, our approach has remained the same. To ensure the happiness of our every homeowner. Before we pick up a pencil to design, and long after the last hammer has been packed away, our attention is, and always will be, on your complete satisfaction.

Our priority—always—is to understand just what you want and need in a home and a community. Your needs influence absolutely all we do. You've arrived on our GTA Page. Please select from the options below. Continue to Homepage to view all our communities across North America. Welcome to Mattamy Homes. You are currently viewing GTA Homes. Markham, The Condominiums of Cornell. This structure has an arch and large circular windows but little in common with Harper Goff's.

The hull is cylindrical with what may be an octagonal cross-section. There are large almost Goff-like salon windows on the lower hull amidships, but no obvious dive planes. The propeller is protected by the aft extensions of the fairings.

D on Irwing illustrated the Classic Press, Inc. Santa Rosa, California edition of 20, Leagues under the Sea. The simple design is a slightly modified spindle with a plain, needle-shaped ram.

The only features visible are large: The tail isn't visible in the images I have, so I've left it off my illustration here. There is no spar but the rakers on the upper forward hull, minus an arch, are a nod to Goff. There are circular hatches just forward of the wheelhouse on either side of a cutwater. The wheelhouse with angled sides and hemispherical windows resembles the version but is much simpler.

The large structure just aft looks like it could house a boat, but the illustrations don't show that it actually does. The deck extends aft to a large rectangular hatch much like in the Hetzel illustrations. There are two forward looking lanterns set in the upper hull and large circular salon windows. The propeller is hidden in a large cylindrical shroud. See the entire set of comic panels on the Bear Alley blog. T he Pendulum Press edition of 20, Leagues Under the Sea , a black and white Weekly Reader edition, later published as a Now Age Illustrated Series Paperback, and finally in color but with somewhat muddier graphics and some illustrations deleted, as Marvel Classic Comics number 4 was illustrated by Romy Gamboa pen and Ernie Patricio ink.

The wheelhouse is distinguished by forward-looking window "eyes", and just under them, twin nozzles for the water jets described in the novel. The hull has dorsal and side fins and a vertical tail. There is a double set of salon windows under the side fins and a dive hatch on the side. A large rudder is mounted aft of the propeller. You can find copies of the Pendulum edition at amazon , among other places. A large image of the original cover is viewable in the Comic Book Database.

There is a large rectangular salon window and a number of small ports aft. The pilothouse, with short rectangular ports, is integral with a solid, open-topped deck enclosure. The boat is recessed in the hull aft of enclosure. The hull flares out to narrow side fins. At the tail these become horizontal fins with dive planes. There is a tall vertical fin above the ring-enclosed four-bladed propeller.

The lower hull has large cylindrical structure, perhaps a ballast tank, below the side flare on either side. D an Thompson scratch-built a Nautilus model in the s. He based it on photos of Harper Goff's Disney creation, but adhered to the dimensions stated in Jules Verne's text. Dan captured most of the Goff details, remarkable considering the minimal references he had, but stretched the hull to Verne's full proportional length.

You can see photos of his model here and here. First seen in the cavern under Lincoln Island, only the upper half is visible, although the reflection in the water gives the impression of a full view. Close-up views when the castaways come alongside conflict in detail; my graphic is a combination of the two views.

The design has a spindle-shaped hull with a serrated fin on the bow. There are ports or lights on the hull and large slanted fins on the aft hull. The wheelhouse is located at the forward end of the long superstructure.

The deck atop the superstructure includes what could be a skylight and a conning tower with periscope. The castaways gain access via a long ladder on the side of the hull leading to a hatch in the side of the superstructure. The Nautilus appears in part 3, viewable on YouTube. Thanks to Vincente Nieto Martin for pointing out this design. The hull is organically spindle-shaped, with Verne's "overlapping" hull plates. It has a ram with serrated edges, probably with a triangular cross-section.

A hemispherical wheelhouse with four circular ports, one on each side and one each fore and aft, is positioned atop the forward hull. There is a large oval salon window just forward of a large horizontal fin that extends to the stern.

The elaborate, flared vertical tail matches the fins. With the scaled hull and the flared fins the design could be an exotic fish, but seeing the ram as its beak, the scales slick feathers, and the fins swept-back wing and tail feathers, to me the submarine in the original artwork resembles a diving sea bird. See the original illustration on Captain Jack's Mobilis in Mobile web page. Thanks to Lyle Simoneaux for pointing out this design.

T he cover of an audio book recording of 20, Leagues under the Sea read by James Mason and published by Caedmon in featured this very un-Disney Nautilus. Still, this fishlike design features a Goff-inspired raker arch. There is a double-cone spar at the tip of the spindle hull. The short deck is dominated by a conical conning tower topped with a tall lantern tower.

There is a large circular salon window forward on the hull, forming the fish's eye and at least nine fins to complement the appearance. The design includes a small hatch on the deck and what is probably a large diving hatch on the hull bottom. The propeller is large and many bladed. A high-resolution image of both sides of the album cover posted at Nautilus Submarine. A rtist Jean Bruneau designed this Nautilus as a paper cut-out model to commemorate the opening of the Jules Verne Museum in Nantes on the th anniversary of Verne's birth.

The slim design has a rectangular cross-section consistent with the simple paper model design that tapers to a pointed raised ram at the bow. The hull continues straight back and then rises to the diamond shaped wheelhouse at the forward end of the deck. The deck extends past a rather tall hatch and ends at a sloped lantern housing that faces aft. The hull tapers to a narrow stern with an oval vertical fin and a small propeller.

The circular salon window is positioned high on the hull forward of a row of smaller ports, running aft. The wide dive planes are set below the hull centerline.

Bruneau featured a very similar Nautilus with a round cross-section as the ace of spades in his commemorative deck of Jules Verne playing cards.

Fred has provided cleaned-up hi-resolution images of the cut-out sheet and enhanced renders of the completed model at NautilusSubmarine free membership necessary.

Thanks to Nemo Jr, Lewis Crow, for discovering this design. T he Return of Captain Nemo , a television series, featured this Nautilus.

The design has a set of large windows in the bow, with a row of smaller windows set high on the hull along the sides. A pair of large diving plane fins are located forward of amidships with smaller fins much further aft. The design has two small propellers mounted under the aircraft-boom-like stern, which features something like a horizontal stabilizer.

No rudder in apparent in the production model photos I've seen, but one may have been fitted to the aft end of the keel. The lower hull includes large bay doors below in the single-window section. The sloped after section of this structure is the only part that comes close to resembling Harper Goff's Nautilus. The three parts of the series were released as a movie, The Amazing Captain Nemo , available at amazon.

S cale Model Ships Unlimited produced this Goff-derivative Nautilus as a fiberglass kit with a detailed plan. The most noticeable deviation from the original is the heavy, oddly barbed ram, as if Goff's spar were dipped in molten metal and stretched and hammered as it cooled.

Goff's elegant rakers are more crudely realized, in some places merely as steps in the hull. The basic shape of the wheelhouse is retained but the two large globular ports are replaced by four smaller, flat ports. The dorsal fin has no rakers and sweeps up instead of down giving this Nautilus , along with the ram, a very different profile.

There is no propeller guard and, less noticeable in the standard view, the aft side rakers flare out to wide horizontal fins. The last major difference is in the salon widows. The signature Goff assembly is replaced by a geometric pyramid with smaller ports on each flat face. Lights or four more ports are set in the hull side around the pyramid. The design image is from a photo of Ed Sutton's nicely finished version of the model.

Closer examination reveals features popularly associated with Nemo's Nautilus. The net cutter rig atop the bow sports three Goffian raker teeth with a mirrored hook on the lower bow. A serrated fin on the keel and reverse rakers on an arch aft of the conning tower continue the theme. The narrow tower wheelhouse has large Goff-like globular ports on either side and a large forward, facing port on the low slanted forward part of the structure.

Smaller hooded, globular glass features on the narrow top of the tower may correspond to Goff's alligator-eye lights or may be ports. The stern is obscured by a giant octopus, but there may be a fin atop it.

There are no salon windows visible but a feature on the side of hull amidships might be a very small dive plane. See this and other artwork on his web site.

Monsters in Motion sells a replica 20, Leagues under the Sea Nautilus Aurora plastic model kit box featuring Di Fate's art on the cover. The sub's hull is more or less spindle shaped with a faceted cross section not unlike Goff's.

The massive wheelhouse, with oddly back-facing ports making it resemble a nautilus-like sea creature, dominates the deck. Rather than a single window, a row of smaller ports provide outside views. The illustration at right pictures Brimeur's realization next to the commemorative box.

See large photos of the box box-art section and the model science fiction anthologies section on the museum web site. The museum is viewable both in French and in English. Most notable is the large salon window with eight circular sections and apparently two levels. Less obvious in my simple graphic, the wheelhouse has additional ports on its side and there are two rows of small ports on the upper and lower hull sides.

The ram has a spiral design, the side and bottom fairings have no rakers, and Goff's skiff appears to be a narrow fin. The tail is more Goff-like than my graphic, based on the cover illustration, shows.

The cover illustration is the only one that shows the arch. One of the illustrations within the book implies a sleeker wheelhouse without an arch and no dorsal fin. B ob Farrell found a small picture of this Nautilus version on the City of Nantes web site. My various attempts to learn more about this image were unsuccessful, but I found the source serendipitously in a French journal article I received from Jean-Michel Margot. Jean Gagneux constructed the detailed model, which has a complete interior based on the Hetzel edition engravings, and used it to illustrate the article.

In the article Gagneux discusses the features of the Nautilus and offers a critical engineering evaluation. He criticizes some of the same features mentioned here, including the diving planes amidships and the location of ram. He concludes Verne did produce a workable submarine design, but alas, it could not have achieved the performance described in the novel.

The relatively unadorned, cigar-shaped hull has a small keel projection amidships and some reinforcement of the bow for a ram. There is a flat, elevated deck platform. The pilothouse faces forward and, like the lantern, has four somewhat convex windows. Jean Gagneux heard about this web site and contacted me. Thanks to his generosity you can see much more of his Nautilus model here. My illustration and MetaStream model adhere to Gagneux's plan, which differs slightly from his model.

Angular barbs on the top and sides of the bow and what could be torpedo tubes give it the appearance of a mohawked fish. One of the barbs atop the forward hull is replaced by a canon near the end of the film. A large articulated dive plane assembly, aft fins, and a similarly articulated rudder tail contribute to the mechanical fish design motif.

Propulsion is provided by dual propellers near the aft end of the hull. The large superstructure has a periscope and viewports at the forward end.

A hatch at the aft end opens onto a narrow deck, which has another hatch. The center section of the superstructure is drawn open by chains to reveal a dock for the boat.

The diving hatch is located on the lower hull just forward of the aft fins. You can view the animated film on YouTube. A bout the same time Gagneux was building his model, Jean-Pierre Bouvet was drawing a very detailed set of plans for this Nautilus. Although it isn't as streamlined as the other designs featured here, it is far and away the most complete design of any I've seen. The simple, cylindrical hull includes exterior sliding panels to cover the salon windows and a pilot house and lantern that are hydraulically elevated or withdrawn.

Jean-Pierre has generously permitted me to feature much of detail of his Nautilus plans here. The illustration and MetaStream model here omit some detail but depict the major features. T his interesting variation on the iconic Harper Goff design was built as paper-over-balsawood 1: In addition to the look of the hull that results from the construction technique, and subtle differences in shape, Wilhelm has made some interesting changes.

The side fairing ends just aft of the salon windows, which features six frame struts instead of Goff's three. In place of the aft fairing there are side fins on the stern and an additional lateral prop guard strut.

There are two four-petal-bladed propellers inline instead of the single five-shovel-blade prop on the classic. See photos of this Nautilus at Nautilus Submarine. J im Humphries ' design for his rubber-band powered Nautilus model was published in the December Scale Ship Modeler , but he actually designed it in the early s. Jim used the novel's engravings as his main source and his lantern and platform are especially faithful to de Neuville's renditions of these structures.

The wheelhouse has Verne's four windows and an original organic look. The large front windows facing off at an angle are reminiscent of Goff's, a very reasonable reference to that memorable boat. Jim's is a working model with the two sets of planes needed for proper operation. He started without a vertical fin, but found lateral stability required it and incorporated the fish-like tail with another nod to Goff.

The model lacks a launch and the salon window is too far aft. The propeller is three bladed, an oversight that Jim intends to fix. For those with a well-equipped woodshop, Jim sells a very detailed set of instructions and plans for constructing this versatile model. It dives and surfaces and can even be made to breach like a whale, just as the Nautilus does in "The Sargasso Sea" chapter, all on rubber-band power. Contact Jim directly via e-mail jfhjr flash.

O ne of the most carefully executed depictions of the Nautilus I've seen is Ron Miller 's design in all his Unicorn editions. The hull has a fully tapered cigar shape and the salon windows are rectangular, which may well have been Verne's intent.

The platform is slightly elevated with the longboat in the center and structures placed as Verne described them. There are a few embellishments, some I think reminiscent of Goff's Nautilus , but none in conflict with the novel. In general this Nautilus , with its retractable pilothouse, is truer to Verne than mine.

S ince the publication of Ron Miller 's several Unicorn volumes he's incorporated some improvements to his design. This version is a little sleeker, the planes are longer, the salon window repositioned, and notice the placement of the rudder out of the propeller wake.

Drawn by Rainer Braunschweig , the design is clearly influenced by Goff. Although narrower than the Disney version, this Nautilus has a similar cross-section, however the similarities end with the serrated raker arch and fin. Much of the rest of the design follows the novel. The pilothouse, which may be retractable, has three oval ports. A flat deck with at least on hatch, in the Goff position aft of the fin, has a recess for the boat, which is accessed via a hatch in the recess at the top of an interior ladder.

The bottom of the ladder is at the dive hatch in the keel. There's no obvious ram, but the forward end of the keel might serve this purpose. The large oval salon windows are positioned according to the text although fins that might be the dive planes are well aft. The four-bladed propeller is smaller than in the novel. You can purchase the cutaway paper model kit, which has a full interior, from the museum about halfway down this page or from www.

T his spindle-hulled Nautilus with its distinctive barbed spur was created by illustrator Joseph Ciardiello for a Reader's Digest Association edition published around Except for the relatively small, two-bladed prop, it appears to follow Verne's text well.

The position of the long boat was not obvious in the drawings so I omitted it from the model. P at Regan 's Nautilus Minisub is a two-place, pressure hull type submarine boat, handcrafted in steel by one man working alone in a modest backyard shop circa Launched in and acknowledged by Disney in , Regan's minisub proved the Goff Nautilus design's feasibility as a free-roving manned submersible.

My image, based on early photos, reflects the original mini- Nautilus. See photos of Pat's construction here on his Vulcania web site. As of , the Nautilus Minisub is in Hawaii being refurbished for a video documentary featuring Regan's functional replicas of the esoteric vintage 20, Leagues diving apparatus. W hen Greg Sharpe saw Jim Humphries rubber-band model he had to have one and Jim's design became the basis for Deep Sea Designs ' first Nautilus , published several times in the early s.

This model can be built from detailed plans available from Deep Sea Designs. It has a non-elevated deck with a hidden launch. There is a diving hatch in the keel near the stern very like Goff's. Greg has a working version of this design. The deck is raised slightly to provide some additional space for retracting the pilothouse and lantern. Two hatches are recessed into the deck. The launch is also recessed and stowed upside-down.

Of course it must roll over on its trip to the surface, causing the occupants some discomfit. There is a davit to handle it on the surface. The salon window is too far astern, although it is consistent with the interior arrangement on the plan. This is a working design with two sets of diving planes, one near the stern and the other in the fin structure at the bow.

G raphic designer Lyle Simoneaux sent me this image of a Nautilus design he first conceived in the 90s or earlier. He's made it a bit more streamlined than the original sketches, but the general appearance remains the same. He changed the classic Harper Goff look for a more cuttlefish-like shape. Also influencing the shape were his thoughts of kit-bashing a GI Joe helicopter toy to realize the design as a model.

The pilot house, which can be withdrawn below the protective stylistic nautilus tentacles just forward, provides a panoramic view through large windows.

The ram is purposely drill-like, a theme continued in the hull side rakers conceived to deflect debris away from the sub. Two midship arches, a tribute to Harryhausen's Mysterious Island Nautilus , were not in Lyle's original sketches but serve two practical purposes. Like the side rakers they protect the hull from ramming debris and add strength to the structure. There are two lanterns at the aft end of the arches, shown retracted, can be extended above the deck. The deeply recessed salon windows are also protected by sliding panels.

Lastly, the tail fins retract when ramming. See Lyle's update of this design here. This is the Nautilus from that production, which also aired in Canada. The design has a circular cross-section and is vaguely shark-like in shape with a symmetrical set of vertical and horizontal tail fins. The single propeller is protected by a circular shroud. There is a deck with a boat aft of a long tapered conning tower that has a recessed open bridge at the forward end.

As in a normal submarine, this could be used only on the surface. There appear to be a line of small ports on the sides of the hull at the vertical centerline and a set of rakers forward of these on the same line. These might support ramming, but the three similar rakers atop the hull aft of the deck don't appear to have a function. More puzzling is the lattice frame construction on the forward hull that tapers to the bow. Resembling fortification breastworks, these seem too fragile to survive a ramming attack.

Much of the series is viewable on YouTube. I'm sure there must be other places in the many hours of film, but the Nautilus is visible about 38 minutes into the last episode. Thanks to Wayne Orlicki for the screenshots used to reconstruct the design and to Lyle Simoneaux whose interior screenshot led to my corrected understanding of the hull shape.

T his Nautilus , from a drawing by Joe Pearson and possibly Kevin Altieri , has a tapered spindle hull and a stepped arch, surely inspired by Goff. The small ram is indistinct in the drawing, partly obscured by searchlights mounted on its sides. The salon in this Nautilus has a large window for its ceiling protected by the arch and and a surrounding framework and occupies much of the bow.

It appears to have a small, more classical round window on the lower part of the hull. There is a gill-like structure on the upper hull just aft of the large window below the wheelhouse. There are several rows of small portholes on the hull and some indistinct features, one of which may be a diving hatch. Propulsion is provided by a pair of structures lined up on the lower hull.

These may have small propellers or they may be water jets, perhaps accounting for the gill structure as an intake. The wheelhouse, near the forward end of a raised deck and anchoring the arch, has two large ports. A second structure occupies the aft end of the deck. Markus Gilman, who rediscovered this artwork, posted the original image on his Metapunk blog.

Thanks to Lyle Simoneaux for pointing this out. B jorn Lundberg sent me an interesting article from a issue of Model Ship Builder. Using numerous citations from the novel, the author, Jeff Phillips , discusses details of the Nautilus design, and raises some technical issues also mentioned elsewhere on these pages.

He carefully evaluates some conflicts in the text and describes a particularly true design. Like Ian Williams and for the same reason, he places the ram above the centerline. He attempts to solve some of the problems with the lantern by making it taller than the wheelhouse.

That structure still casts a large shadow forward, and Jeff suggests Nemo's design would be improved by several better positioned lights rather than one. His design has a very large salon window, filling, as he says, "most of the area of the salon". Although he scrutinized the description of the structure, he neglected the contents. Nemo's art collection requires a good deal of wall space, limiting the window size.

S tan Sanders has built a Nautilus model with some noticeable differences. The most significant feature is the stern with its low mounted screw. I originally thought Stan had placed the lantern between the deck and the pilothouse, but closer examination of the pictures revealed a second lantern astern.

The illustration of the Nautilus in the cavern in the Hetzel Mysterious Island has lanterns rather like these. The lanterns and the pilothouse appear retractable and the launch is at least partially recessed into the deck.

There are a couple of features clearly derived from Goff's design. I've reconstructed the design from a set of small black and white pictures so some proportions and details are speculative. The aft diving planes, typical of the working models, are prominent in the pictures, but the location of a forward set is my best guess. It has a triangular, cookie cutter like ram with an extendable center.

The ram is faired with three saw-tooth fins, reminiscent of Harper Goff. The main salon windows are set into the hull and look forward, although there are also side looking ports. The lantern is set forward on the upper hull and the retractable wheelhouse sits nearly amidships, just forward of the main hatch. A pair of large downward tilted dive planes or fins amidships is augmented by apparent planes on the horizontal tail.

The vertical tail ends in a tall fin-shaped rudder aft of the three-bladed prop. Both tail fins have a serrated edge, again a likely nod to Goff. The hull is rather bulbous with a squat cross-section, the beam dimension greater than the height. This Nautilus is more organic in shape than most and appears to be smaller. See pictures of the Nautilus in the movie on this Mobilis in Mobile page. I've had comments, especially from Ishmael, that it is not an accurate representation of the Nautilus as seen in the movie.

Accordingly, I've stretched the hull to better match some of the screenshots, giving it a sleeker appearance.

Although the Revell model appears to match some of miniatures seen in production photos it may be inaccurate. I don't know how much of the underwater sequences was computer-generated and how much was filmed miniatures, but perhaps a technique similar to that used for some scenes in the Disney film was employed.

For those Disney scenes a very distorted, shortened miniature was used because a wide-screen Cinemascope camera was not available. When projected with a Cinemascope lens these scenes matched the rest of the movie. I've made a few other less noticeable changes, particularly adding two rows of lights. I liked the Nautilus , designed by Stewart Burnside and Jim Millett of the Model Smiths , immediately, but for a long time thought it looked more like a space ship, or maybe a deep sea exploration platform, than Nemo's weapon of revenge.

However it does in fact resemble a sea creature, the horseshoe crab. The designers actually had a Balmain bug butterfly fan lobster in mind. The wheelhouse is integral with the hull and has three rectangular windows facing more or less forward. There is a deck set into the aft portion of the upper hull. The lower part of the hull is more open and spindly than the top. It has what appears to be a hidden, perhaps extendable ram below the front of the armored carapace.

Just aft, two large circular salon windows face forward. The aft part of the hull narrows and then flares into a wide tail with dual propeller mechanisms. All in all this Nautilus resembles a giant prehistoric crustacean, but also has a Victorian look. See this ReoCities page for photos of the movie model and this Mobilis in Mobile page for pictures of the Nautilus from the movie.

Rick applied early advice from Harper Goff to explore beyond the author's words, to move past the expected and go for the visually startling. The hull of this Nautilus is articulated so that it moves like a giant four-flippered sea monster as well as looking like one.

The "head" of the monster contains the pilothouse with four "eye" windows and a central lantern. The "beak" could serve as a ram, but this Nautilus has other weapons. Barbed hooks can extend from the back and sides of the monster's head; spikes and claws are embedded in the flipper fins. Although the main reference to the novel is its monster-like appearance, the design doesn't ignore Verne.

There is a launch midway along the plated back. More mobile than Nemo's partly submersible canot, this is a true mini-sub with six deployable wheels to make it amphibious as well. The launch has triangular barbs, reminiscent of Goff's Nautilus , four ports like those of the pilothouse and a row of ports around the lower bow, useful for undersea exploration.

Just below the launch the hull side has large, not quite Goff-like salon windows, and just below these on the lower hull, similar large downward looking ports. Of all the Nautilus designs I've seen, this is the most monster-like, truly a terror of the seas.

I find it easier to think of it as a living creature than a submarine. P aul Wright 's version in the new Eyewitness Classics children's book is based on Miller's but he has taken some liberties inconsistent with the novel. There is a horizontal tail rather like a modern submarine with, apparently, a second set of planes.

The triangular ram has been replaced with a cruciform one. The rectangular salon window is now round. The most glaring revision is the raising of the platform into a sort of conning tower, perhaps to better resemble a modern sub. The deck hatch no longer opens on the platform, but on the hull.

There are several other cosmetic, non-conflicting embellishments. T his Nautilus , drawn by John Benson in , resembles a giant prehistoric alligator. The basic profile resembles Goff's classic design but takes it in another extreme direction.

The rakers along the top, bottom and sides of Goff's bow are re-imagined as massive armor plates over the entire hull. The arch remains but folded down into the hull. Instead of large spherical ports the wheelhouse has horizontal slits. The salon window remains, Nemo's one compromise for exploration, but appears almost inset and protected by the armor. This Nautilus is truly a sea monster and a war machine. My graphic doesn't do justice to Benson's artwork and I wanted to include a link to his original pen and ink drawing but the.

He's incorporated numerous new ideas, including a feature or two from my design. The wheelhouse now has a forward-facing window with a headlight mounted on top. He has retained two sets of diving planes along the side of the hull, a practical consideration for any working model. Diving planes at the "center of floatation" where Verne positions them, provide less control than the fore and aft planes found on modern subs.

John has told me the circular salon window is stronger and less likely to leak than other shapes. G reg Rico drew this Nautilus in the mid s.

It has more classic lines than his later armored, steam punk designs, featured below. The deck is in a smoothly faired superstructure marked only by the deck scuppers along the sides and the recessed wheelhouse windows. This gives the boat an overall clean appearance.

The lantern is mounted just aft of the deck atop the superstructure. There are two sets of horizontal fins, the forward fins incorporating small diving planes. The salon windows are recessed in the hull just below the forward fins. T he hole punched in the Scotia 's hull is described as two and a half meters below her waterline, but Nemo says he was traveling two meters below the surface when the collision occurred.

This would place the Nautilus's centerline more than six meters deep. Ian Williams ' design, illustrated here, addresses this problem by raising the ram to match the hole. The ram in this position also addresses a similar issue. During the trip to the South Pole, Aronnax describes the Nautilus using its ram as an icebreaker as it crosses the Antarctic ice shelf on the surface. Perhaps this could be done with a centerline ram but it seems to me the force would tend to drive the submarine beneath the ice.

Ian has given the salon a much larger window than the other designs and two rudders. The rudders, meant to evoke Goff's embedded diving planes, may seem strange, but a plan of Nordenfelt's first submarine, built in , shows two rudders in a similar arrangement. I found a sketch of Ian's Nautilus on his web page. He has since updated both. Visit his site for the sketch and a detailed plan and then look around a bit to enjoy the examples of his art opens in a new window.

I have talked about my design elsewhere but here is a little more background and an illustration for comparison. I used a true cylinder with tapered ends for hull, based in part on fitting the very large salon within it. Some illustrations of the cigar ships from the mids show a more tapered cigar shape.

I placed the platform directly on the hull because the text places it 80 centimeters out of the water. This corresponds exactly with Nemo's statement that one tenth of the hull is exposed on the surface. Bell designed this streamlined Nautilus for a Sega CD adventure game.

Unfortunately Sega discontinued the CD platform before production could be completed. Eric Quakenbush was the primary designer for the game, but Jon, with Eric's input, designed and built the 3D model. They were considerably influenced by the Naval Institute Press annotated edition of 20, Leagues under the Sea see more about this excellent version on my Twenty Thousand Leagues page.

Although the actual game design never got past the demo stage, Jon completed various proof-of-concept animations showing the exterior of the submarine and the interior rooms. His design, notable for its odd, fan-shaped propeller, includes two forward lanterns near the pilothouse in addition to the one at the end of the platform.

You can see renderings and some plans of this Nautilus here. Clearly based on the novel, it has similarly shaped pilot house and lantern structures at either end of a subtle deck. There is a dinghy approximately amidships and a hatch just aft. The hull has no obvious ram but there is an elaborate structure with a salon window forward of a large trapezoidal dive plane.

A gracefully shaped vertical fin encloses the prop and probably incorporates the rudder. There may also be a small horizontal fin component, perhaps serving as a partial prop guard. The image shows a hint of a keel structure on the forward part of the cylindrical section of the hull. A large bulge on the lower hull aft might be associated with a diving hatch. You can see Comblat's original image on his web page here.

G raphic designer Gary M Burley has taken on the imposing task of illustrating every page of 20, Leagues under the Sea , changing nothing except the Nautilus to add his "own stamp to its look". Based on the remarkable drawings he's completed, he is true to his word and remarkably consistent in his depictions of the Nautilus.

His submarine has a unique Gothic appearance with perhaps a touch of Giger. From the somewhat organic ram, following the vicious raker teeth along the upper hull to the reptilian eyes of the mid-deck pilot house, this is truly a frightening sea monster. The illustrations show at least two hatches, one on the sloping back of the pilothouse.

Burley also depicts a small "elevated hydraulic" pilot's cage just forward of the vertical fin not shown in the graphic here. There are many view ports including one on the lower hull with a frame resembling an eye. The design has two three-bladed propellers. The long structure below the stern may also have a propulsion function.

See many of Burley's drawings and possibly purchase a print at Saatchi Art. D esigner Ryan Rex realized this Nautilus as a scratch-built model as the submarine appeared after years in the cavern under the Mysterious Island. The design has a fish-shaped hull with a massive arch for a ram.

A cylindrical wheelhouse is incorporated within and protected by the arch. A deck extends aft along the top of the hull almost to the fish tail.

The salon window replaces a hexagonal hull panel amidships, just aft of and above the whale fin dive plane. A set of small propellers under the tail provides propulsion. The model as built differs slightly from the concept drawing I've used here. See the drawing and photos of the model on this ArtStation page. The hull is spindle-shaped and the wheelhouse and lantern appear retractable. Anthony has placed the launch at the end of the platform and protected the five-bladed propeller within a cylindrical guard.

The wheelhouse and lantern are at least partially retractable into the cylindrical hull. The rectangular salon windows, which are placed a little far aft, are fitted with a protective grid.

Nobumitsu has added what may be a set of forward-facing windows in the hull, although these may be lights to augment the lantern. The prop appears to have three blades. Unfortunately, the renderings of this Nautilus appears to be no longer available on the Internet.

Thanks to Mark Dee who told me about this design. The flattened upper surface of the hull is notable. Most designs add a raised platform, or leave the deck surface rounded. Michael uses a five-sided lantern, like Jim Humphries, but turns it around to keep the light from shining directly into the wheelhouse. Note the window atop the wheelhouse that provides a sternward view when the structure is rotated into the hull for streamlining.

The space ship-like cylindrical design, which only loosely follows Verne's description, is twice the size of Verne's, but it would work at the standard size. Instead of a ram, this Nautilus has a pair of blades on the bow, the upper with a saw-tooth edge, that form a vicious pincer, mimicking the beak of a giant mechanical squid. There are also retractable mechanical tentacles that featured unsuccessfully in one sequence in the fourth comic.

There is a more Verne-like retractable compartment at the forward end of the deck, just aft of the saw tooth, and a captain's yacht that can be launched from a mid-deck recess. Instead of a salon, the submarine has a large library amidships with very large circular view ports. These appear to be protected by large panels with the single letter N, visible in some of the illustrations.

Navigate to "Albums", then to "Nemo" to see images from four issues. Although not strictly following the text, his design is reasonably true to Verne while incorporating elements from Goff and many other sources.

Notable features are a partially retractable control room forward of the small wheelhouse, a folding exterior ladder in the aft keel below the dive hatch, a downward looking window at the bottom of the main, spiral stairway, and additional lights fore and aft on the lower hull. The very large fins are distinctly fishlike. One of the more interesting details of the design is his overlapping the hull plates top-to-bottom, rather than bow-to-stern as others have done.

The images here are of my model based on the plan and drawings in the book. T his is Jesper Kurt-Nielsen 's original spindle-hulled Nautilus concept.

The deck details reflect the Hetzel edition illustrations, like many of the designs. The stern features an asymmetric rudder. His original art included Aronnax standing on the deck in the classic Riou drawing that, according to Walter James Miller in The Annotated 20, Leagues , Verne posed for himself. J esper Kurt-Nielsen added ornamentation to his second Nautilus and changed to a symmetrical stern. You can see his color renditions of both designs including the Aronnax figure on his Danish Virtual Verne web site.

SantaColoma created this Nautilus for Virtual Sailor. He says he " based my version of the Nautilus on the Disney Studios interpretation, Campbell Grant's adaptation for the Golden Press book, and my own ideas about what Verne intended. For instance, I did not create a spike strip on the underside of the craft, feeling it would not make sense in practice.

The rest of the hull narrows to be more fishlike, so that the deck slopes downward. The salon window is farther forward and the tail is enlarged to better resemble a fish tail. You can download this Nautilus from the submarine page at Virtual Sailor.

The download is a zip archive in exe from that can be opened by any archive program like 7z or WinZip. The submarine components are in Direct X format, which can be imported by many 3D modeling programs. T his Nautilus appears in the introductory title sequence of a series of animated films called "Jules Verne's Amazing Journeys" from Tele Images International.

The design has a modified spindle hull and a somewhat fishlike appearance. There is a simple spar ram on the prow, and very large observation windows on the upper bow with smaller oblong ports just aft. A large arch, a nod to Harper Goff's iconic Nautilus , rises on the upper hull, protecting the superstructure amidships that has many round ports. The animation image is not clear, but there may be a propeller or rudder just aft of the lower fin on the stern.

A cruciform tail is located at the very stern. You can see this Nautilus at the very beginning of this Mysterious Island animated film, La Isla Misteriosa de Julio Verne the Nautilus in the film itself is very different. Reasonably organic I'm afraid it looks like a bloated fish, perhaps appropriate for the Nautilus that has been dormant in a cave for years.

There is a small pointed ram on the lower bow below an enormous observation window. The upper hull has a row of pointed barbs running up to an open bridge at the very top. The balloon-like hull tapers to a narrow waist and then expands to a second smaller section that finishes with a set of small, backward-facing barbs before transitioning to a fish-like tail.

The hull has three upward-shining lights on each side and another atop the aft section. Recall the original illustration in Verne's novel showing two light beams lighting up the cavern. Just aft of the salon window there is an intake on the side of the hull that might be associated with the power system but this Nautilus has a standard propeller.

The bottom of the forward hull appears flat but the after section is never shown. T his Nautilus by Nick Porcino reminds me of an armored crustacean that might move along the bottom of the sea. The overlapping plates fit one of the descriptions that Aronnax records in the novel.

The sawtooth rakers atop the forward hull, the shape of the wheelhouse and the salon window almost call to mind Goff's design although the window is located far aft , but I'm inclined to consider any resemblance an unconscious coincidence.

The design features a massive armored ram with smaller barbs. The wheelhouse has large ports on the sides and a periscope and possible snorkel, both likely retractable for ram attacks. What may be a boat is set into the short deck just aft of the wheelhouse and short deck rail.

The superstructure has a port just below the boat. A narrow fairing runs almost the full length of the lower hull, ending forward of large dive planes. The stern has a small four-bladed prop and a large rudder. The cover artist was Lawrence Ratzkin , but I have not been able to identify the illustrator responsible for the drawings in the book. The design features a spindle hull offset toward the bow. A set of relatively small dive planes is located just below the center line and about halfway from the bow to midships.

A large round port is placed on the centerline amidships. The hull tapers back to a fair-sized four-bladed propeller protected by vertical and horizontal fins. The horizontal fins appear to function as dive planes and the vertical fins hold a large rudder.

A good-sized, hexagonal wheelhouse with six round windows is set forward of a simple deck at about the widest part of the hull. There's no indication of a launch or lantern. F rank Chase has conceived a Nautilus that calls Goff's design to mind but is very different. Frank began from Verne's text but has taken a few liberties. The result is a graceful but powerful appearance. His 3D model has a full interior laid out very much as Verne described.

I find the appointments and machinery somewhat modern, but the detail is incredible and the result impressive. F rank Chase 's web site also features interior views of his second Nautilus.

Although resembling his original design, Frank went back to the text for this version. The Goff influence is gone. The deck is clearly Verne but the ram is set high like Ian Williams. The salon window is rectangular like Ron Miller's. See Frank's third Nautilus below.

D esign Wheel , a company that designs film, television, and interior spaces created this Nautilus concept as a study for a film of 20, Leagues under the Sea. To quote their website, "The ' Nautalis ' is reborn in this new version of the famous Jules Verne novel". The concept draws on the classic Harper Goff design but reverses some elements for a very different appearance and includes the movie scene of the Nautilus held by the giant squid by adding a tentacle motif to the hull.

A concept drawing and some interior sketches were posted on the non-defunct Design Wheel website, near the end of the page. The link now goes to an Internet Archive capture of the page that unfortunately does not include the images. There's not much of Jules Verne in the design, but the propeller shaft mounted below the tail is interesting. I'm sure it's only a coincidence but it reminds me of some of the experimental propellers tried out on the Walter S.

Thanks to Mark Young, who pointed out this design. The design has an organic, but also jerry-rigged appearance. The only part that might be traced to Harper Goff is the large and vicious saw-tooth affixed to the forward hull.

The pilothouse, with two large, irregular windows, just aft of saw, is otherwise the highest point on the hull. There are small lanterns mounted atop the forward hull on each side of the saw, and possibly two more atop the hull just aft of the pilothouse, although these may be portholes.

Two large, roughly rectangular view ports extend from each side, the forward pair from the library, and a slightly larger set from the salon. Just aft of these the hull is adorned with some complex structures that merge into curling tentacles.

It has most of the features of the version described here, but is flatter and more elongated, with a more prehistoric sea creature appearance. You can buy the English version of this richly illustrated book, Voyage Into the Deep , at amazon. The sinister wheelhouse and light, shown in their retracted positions, remind me of pill box gun emplacements. This sub could have easily terrorized 19th century seas.

See Robert's images here and here. In his description Bruce acknowledges the only obvious error - five blades on the prop instead of four.

My graphic doesn't do justice to the classic appearance of the spindle hull and almost stiletto-like triangular cross-section, three-bladed ram.

The small wheelhouse has five or six sides with one facing forward. The lantern is a little taller than the wheelhouse with two lights facing forward. The deck between the wheelhouse and the lantern is integral with the hull - there is no platform - and protected by a low railing, part of which appears to be a chain that can be lowered to launch the boat, located mid-deck.

The oval salon window is sized to match the interior view of some of the original engravings. The dive planes, located amidships, are short fore and aft but project noticeably to the sides to provide a large control surface. The rudder, mounted on the hull bottom forward of the prop, is similarly large. You can see some nice graphics of this Nautilus on the Bowman Arts website.

The design is clearly inspired by an illustration in the original Hetzel edition with details suggested by other sources. The image at right, produced from a published screenshot, shows two searchlights imbedded in the deck, matching the Hetzel illustration shown as an inset.

Close examination of the original drawing shows the lights are imbedded in the superstructure, but no matter. The design has two dinghies, one on each side of the deck, a nice improvement on my own original Nautilus.

The pilot house and a pilot house and lantern are similar to several designs in the catalog. The nicely detailed hull uses overlapping plates just like those of my new Nautilus , except that they are much smaller. My recreation image of this design at left speculates on parts such as the salon window and dive plane not visible in the published screenshot graphics.

The published interior screenshots show a recurring chambered nautilus design motif similar to the raised emblem on the bow. Such decoration might extend to the outside portion of the window.

Additional information and screen shots can be found at this game web site or by a web search of the game title. You can buy the game at amazon. The submarine does have passages from the deck to the complete salon but unfortunately no other interior rooms to explore. A ccording to a capsule history provided by John McEwan , his Victorian Science Fiction Submarine Narwal was built by the French in using information that Aronnax, actually a French secret agent, collected during his sojourn aboard the Nautilus.

It has many of the features described in the novel and improvements similar to other designs featured in the Catalog. John acknowledges Ian William's Nautilus as an inspiration. The lantern is mounted atop the wheel house. In addition to the helmsman's windows, the extended wheelhouse includes a set of portholes on the sides of what might be a full control room.

A launch is located in the center of the deck forward of the main hatch. There are aft dive planes in a set of horizontal fins and the expected hull-mounted planes planes are moved forward of the large salon windows. A double rudder is set in the vertical fins very similar to the Williams Nautilus and the triangular cross-section ram is set high. The four bladed prop is protected by an annular shroud attached to aft fins.

McEwan's Reviresco war gaming company features some other images and a paper card model of the Narwal on its web site. The hull is asymmetrically cigar-shaped with a rounded stern and a pointed bow. The ram has two fins that, combined with the extended keel, would make a triangular cut in the hull of an attacked ship. The pilothouse and lantern have the same shape and appearance. The profile is reminiscent of Harper Goff's but there are two side-by-side raker arches, like Ray Harryhausen's Mysterious Island Nautilus.

Only part of the railing is visible in my graphic, but the top of the wheelhouse somewhat resembles a fleet boat submarine conning tower. There is a rather beak-like triangular ram and an eye-like salon window. T his RC design has four dive planes, two small ones just forward of the salon window and two aft in a set of large horizontal fins. The deck includes a boat amidships and a large forward-facing lantern at the aft end. You can see photos of this nicely finished model here.

See his newer in-work Nautilus version below. We only see the submarine at its cavern dock with a row of bright ports or lights just below the surface, so I've rendered a view with the part below the waterline ghosted out except for those lights.

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