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Educator looking for companionship

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Educator looking for companionship

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Someone who's not on here seeking for a slut, someone who's not into whatsoever, someone who's a nonsmoker, and someone who is LOCAL, LOCAL, Educator looking for companionship. I'm well hung and have a tongue of gold(as one of my exes told me) I to please, like to eat pussy :) please put your name in the subject line, so I know you are real. Im not on her to just hook up. Big dick monster here I am just seeking for a female who would like to hang out and let things Educator looking for companionship naturally.

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Educator looking for companionship

Slut From Racine

No Educator looking for companionship etc seeking forward to hearing from you.

Not seeking for a one time hook-up, need a regular 2-3 times a week kinda girl. Bartender at Locos's m4w Ok first of all, I just want to say im not some creepystalker boy.

Lately I've found myself wanting to be in a relationship of some sorts, with someone. Personally, I identify as a grey ace, pan-romantic, but I think the idea of actually dating is a bit I tried the whole dating thing once; it didn't end very well after about four months or so.

Essentially, what I've been thinking of is a companion. Yes; kind of like doctor who, except without the time travel. But, pretty much someone that I could be cute with; take out on dates or picnics or go road tripping with; cuddle, hold hands, possibly kiss or get a little physical no sex though , but I'm finding it increasingly hard to find someone my age that wants to do something like that.

Most kids in my university are very sexual, or physical, and the asexuals that I do know don't want to be bothered with a relationship. I'm a bit of an introvert by bit I mean I'm an extreme introvert and have a hard time expressing myself vocally to others. I'm very monogamous in that respect. But, I guess I'm curious to know if there are other people out there who feel sort of how I do; where they'd like the relationship with someone but, it's not so much a relationship as it is extreme companionship?

Perhaps what you're looking for is a romantic partnership or romantic friendship? That's pretty much what I want, if i ever meet someone: That sounds more or less like my ideal romantic relationship.

I don't know if what you have in mind is platonic or romantic, but in my case I'd call it romantic. In any case, judging by what I've read on AVEN there's plenty of asexuals who want something similar but can't really get it because there are so few asexuals or sexuals willing to compromise , and then there's the matter of relationship compatibility.

But, then again, I find it interesting how we're a rather "large" community I say large- it's the most active and we're all facing the same problems. I have more of a romantic relationship in mind; though platonic is also good. I just don't think I can stand for the whole, 'seeing more than one person' thing, because I'm very aggressively jealous when I'm with someone and they show more interest in someone else.

But yeah, I suppose you're right. There's a lot to go into it; especially the compatibly. Still though, it's ideal; it's just a matter of finding someone else that I connect with that would want to share that? I love the idea of a relationship like that. Closeness, but without the expectation or pressure to have sex. I just want a super super close friend I can do relationship-y stuff with, and spend my time with, and enjoy myself with. For me, I'd call it a relationship more than just a friendship, based on how much I'd be sharing with the person.

And at least you've got some freedom in a university, and know some other aces personally. As a high schooler who doesn't know a single ace personally I'd say you've got the better deal and better opportunities than me at least.

This is my wish as well. Someone I can be romantic with but not actually "date". Someone I can be silly with but won't elsewhere for a guy who can be serious. I can be super seriol, guys! I have a friend who is a guy, and we say our friendship is a "special friendship". Other friends and family have told me they think we should date and that he would be good for me. He was the one who actually introduced asexuality to me. I tell other friends and family that us dating wouldn't work because we are interested in different things, which is partially true.

This friend and I are very close; we may appear to be on a date in a public place, we are just friends. I also tell people that another reason for not dating is that I don't want to mess with a good thing the friendship. I feel exactly the same way as you. I don't want to 'date' someone in the traditional sense. I do, however, want someone to to spend my life with, and to be close to emotionally.

A companion, as you described it, sounds perfect. Of course, I identify as homoromantic, and I feel as though I'll never find another girl who will want to be with me, without having sex. Ah, that sounds like exactly what I want I have no idea how to go about getting it, though! You sound exactly like me. I don't know anyone ,outside of Aven, who would want the same thing. So we're in the same boat. This sounds exactly like the kind of relationship I would want as well.

But I've yet to find someone that fits that description. I just got out of a relationship. It wasn't the reason the relationship ended but I think I will definitely be more cautious of future relationships. I wouldn't mind companionship. I feel the same way. At least, I think I do. I've only recently identified myself as an asexual, so the whole thing is kind of new to me. Once a bond of trust is established, I enjoy cuddling, hugging, and chaste kissing.

But as soon as it gets sexual I become uncomfortable. I want to find a partner with whom I can be affectionate, but not sexual. Someone who is willing to walk through life with me hand in hand. A union of souls, if not bodies.

Current college student here. I've started 'officially' dating a friend I've had here for over a year we've been moving in this direction for quite a while a couple months ago. Since we're both in fairly demanding majors, on the physical side our relationship has been moving pretty slow. We've made out some, but haven't gone much further than that. A year ago I never would have imagined myself being comfortable with that kind of thing, but because I trust him so completely these small steps have been easy to take.

At first I found french kissing rather disgusting, but I warmed up to it. It's an expression of emotional intimacy and trust to me, more than anything. It was mentioned a long time ago while we were friends that I identified as an asexual.

I don't think he exactly understands what that means or doesn't quite believe me; I'm not sure. It hasn't been brought up since and I don't intend to any time soon.

I'm not opposed to having sex, but if I find it too uncomfortable we may have to have a discussion about what that means for us. I don't see us heading there particularly soon though.

What you want to me sounds like a very typical relationship without sex. Personally, I think you might be looking a little too long-term to start out with. Asexuality need not even be brought up to start with. I think you should look for a relationship with someone you care about, who respects you enough to be willing to take things slow. Also, the perception that all college student relationships are centered around sex is I think over-stated. A lot of people are looking to wait until marriage or at least until the relationship is much more established.

If I hadn't met this boy, I wouldn't be dating now. Sometimes, even if you want companionship, the right person just isn't in your life at the moment.

I would look for people you have strong connections with and take any relationship on a case-by-case basis. Each situation and each person's needs will be unique. Once someone has a history and connection with you, they may be more willing to compromise than when they first met you.

This relationship has been the easiest thing in the world for me. We enjoy talking and have enough other things that interest us about one another, than we need not push towards the sexual when either of us is uncomfortable. This sounds ideal to me too. I have always wanted to have really super close friendships, not a lot of friends, but with those few special people I want to be really cuddly and affectionate and free to be open and intimate and know that we share commitment to eachother, but no sexual interest.

Now, I have always wanted to get married and be a mother and I am married, not a mom yet though but sex was never a big part of what I hoped for or imagined, for having kids sure, but other than that it's not what I'm looking for, but I do want the sense of unity and commitment, and I enjoy the romance even if I could also live without it.

Before I met my husband, I felt like I could be happy and content living the rest of my life with my best friend until work issues and personality clashes ended up tearing the whole thing apart in a really scarring way but I won't go into that, we have since repaired our friendship though we don't live together anymore, obviously since I have since then married someone else.

We were roommates for a long time, and were probably a lot closer than many people typically think of as friendship. We never thought of ourselves as being in a 'relationship', we didn't think of it as typically romantic, but it's likely that it looked that way to other people. I would have enjoyed being even more affectionate with her than we were, but she's not really a touchy feely person, and doesn't go in for 'mushy' stuff at all, so I did feel pretty special that she would actually be that way at all with me.

In any case I definitely think that kind of relationship is possible! Also as another example to encourage you, we have some 'family friends' who are two ladies who did room together in college and though I think they may have dated some other people in the past neither of them ever got married and now they are in their 50's I think and have bought a house together and I'm sure they'll be together for the rest of their lives, but it's pretty clear they're not a romantic couple neither of them seem like terribly romantic people to begin with anyways , they're just best friends.

I am so happy that I grew up with their example of what a good friendship can be like! So I guess anyways, take heart! Asexual Relationships Search In. Help fund AVEN's servers! Archived This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Over 50 and Looking for Love Online | Hadassah Magazine

Although, it should be noted that individuals without. At The Huffington Post's request, Seeking Arrangement listed the top 20 universities attended by sugar babies on the site. They compiled the list according to the number of sugar babies who registered using their. The University of California at Berkeley ranks at No.

Seeking Arrangement is hardly the only website with a business model that revolves around the promotion of sugar daddy and sugar baby relationships. More than half a dozen websites advertise such services. Find that special someone to help you with books, dorm, rent or tuition today! Beautiful, intelligent, and classy college students, aspiring actresses or models.

While more conventional dating site Match. According to online dating entrepreneur Noel Biderman, unlike conventional dating sites, "arrangement-seeking" websites are the only ones where women consistently outnumber men.

Biderman says the lone exception to this rule is eHarmony. He's also the creator of AshleyMadison. Currently, Avid Life Media operates two websites that promote what the company calls "mutually beneficial relationships. On one such site, EstablishedMen. Much like Seeking Arrangement's Google ads, Biderman advertises his arrangement-seeking websites on MTV and VH1, since both television stations appeal to the demographic he covets.

After sampling the profiles of some of the women on his sites, Biderman concludes their debt, combined with a weak economy, has many clamoring for a sugar daddy to call their own.

Their search makes sense to Biderman, who volunteers that, while now married, he would have made for an excellent sugar daddy in his younger days. It's tough to pay that amount of debt down, live in a decent city and still be able to socialize and do fun things. At some point, you'll have to start making major sacrifices," he says. That becomes a real game-changer in how you get to live your life. Biderman finds some women seek arrangements to help get them through a particularly difficult week or month, while others saddled with significantly more debt might search for a longer-term, more lucrative hookup.

Either way, Biderman sees men wanting "young, vivacious arm candy while women want a guy who can take them out for a Michelin two-star dinner, take them on the trip of their dreams, or who knows, maybe they'll even find some guy to pay off their debt.

When Barb Brents, a professor of sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, conducts research in various legal brothels in the state, she finds women hailing from a variety of different backgrounds. Brents often finds that women turn to sex work when, in their professional lives, they're unable to make ends meet. Brents equated modern-day college students seeking online sugar daddies to a phenomenon among young, working women nearly a century ago.

During the s and s, some young women who worked at minimum-wage jobs during the day would supplement their meager paychecks by meeting up with male suitors at night.

They'd swap companionship and sex in exchange for either a clothing allowance or rent money. Such women, explains Brents, never referred to themselves as prostitutes.

With the exception of women who consider sex work their profession, Brents finds that nearly all the women she encounters in her research describe it as a temporary, part-time, stopgap kind of measure. When meeting men online, she sometimes goes by the name of Suzanne.

Earlier this spring, after Suzanne got fired from her job as a waitress at a diner on the Upper East Side, a girlfriend suggested she create a profile on Seeking Arrangement. Suzanne had grown desperate after falling behind on rent. Suzanne already has an associate's degree in elementary education from a community college in New Jersey. Unable to find a job as a teacher's aide, she decided to enroll in paralegal classes at night. But after losing her job, the extra debt proved more than she could afford.

Over the past few months, Suzanne says she's gone on more than 40 dates with men from the site. She's not interested in getting wined and dined every single time. At a minimum, she hopes for at least a modicum of attraction. She's already turned down a man who weighed pounds, as well as the advances of countless married men. Though desperate, Suzanne says a homewrecker she is not.

Following numerous emails and chats on the phone, Suzanne generally schedules a first meeting with a man in a public place -- a crowded restaurant, cafe or bar. After nearly giving up on finding an arrangement, Suzanne recently met a year-old college professor from Dover, N.

So far, the two have gone on three dates. They typically meet at his house, where he usually cooks her dinner. Afterwards, they have sex. It's not bad money for a night. Mostly, she doesn't want the men thinking she's only seeing dollar signs, pegged to when her rent or tuition money is due.

While she does not label herself a prostitute, Suzanne's not one to mince words: Weitzer says arrangement websites operate lawfully since simply advertising for a sugar daddy or sugar baby is within the realm of legality. Allen Lichtenstein, a private attorney in Las Vegas who specializes in first amendment issues, affirms that in order for an exchange to be classified as prostitution there has to be a clear "meeting of the minds" that the arrangement is a quid pro quo, or exchange of sex for money.

Absent an immediate sex-for-pay exchange, the legal waters grow far murkier. It would simply cover too much ground. But Weitzer views more extended, involved relationships -- say, a monthly stipend or dinner and occasionally having sex -- as ways for both "college girls and sex workers to camouflage what's very likely prostitution.

Weitzer sees college women as particularly susceptible to entering such an arrangement, especially during times of economic distress. Weitzer also sees a potential danger for young women getting sucked into making large sums of money and later finding it difficult to abandon such a lifestyle. A year ago, Dayanara started dating an older, married executive while working as a summer intern at an investment bank in New York.

The two would meet up once every few weeks, for a night out in Miami or a romantic weekend in the Caribbean. Dayanara, now 23, would set some of the money aside for school and living expenses, often sending the remainder home to her parents in Puerto Rico. Eventually, the relationship soured. In May, Dayanara moved back to New York. Rather than look for a job on Wall Street, she began an elaborate online hunt for other hookups.

She says she's now engaged in three separate sugar daddy relationships, in addition to working part time as a topless masseuse on the Lower East Side. On her profile on Seeking Arrangement, she describes herself as a M.

Meanwhile, she's paying off her debt and saving for her dream graduate school: Her biggest fear is that one of these days she'll run into one of the bankers from her former life. Six of the eight women interviewed for this article mentioned the longer-term psychological toll of pretending to be someone else. Double lives and dual identities are common for both the women and men involved in sugar relationships.

Lately, when Dayanara catches her reflection in a storefront window, she says she sometimes doesn't know which version of herself is staring back.

To play it safe, Dayanara and most of the women generally tell one friend where they're going. In the case of Suzanne, neither her father, who works as an emergency room physician, nor her mother, who works as a registered nurse, knows about her new job.

Both Suzanne and Dayanara also have to keep their work hidden from most of their friends, fearing the stigma associated with revealing their secret. You're involved in both a secret world and a public world," says Weitzer. The question becomes how well you can manage this cognitive dissonance.

Besides the stress, Weitzer mentions other challenges for the college student hoping to leave sex work behind and eventually assume a nine-to-five gig.

Gaps on resumes notwithstanding, the difference in pay can come as quite a shock. As two enterprising anthropology undergraduates at George Washington University, Elizabeth Nistico and Samuel Schall tackled the phenomenon of sugar daddy culture for a recent school project.

Schall studied young, gay sugar babies, and Nistico explored the straight scene. Of their study's participants, more than half said the money they received financed their education. On average, the relationships lasted between three and four months.

Nistico found that some of the sugar babies used the excuse of the economic downturn for behavior she thinks they would still have otherwise condoned. Ronald Roberts and Teela Sanders, two social science professors in the U. They fear that as college costs continue to rise, more students will pursue sex work. Roberts asked college students at a university in London about their participation in sex work.

The findings were stark. Nearly 17 percent said they would be willing to participate in the sex trade in order to pay for their education, while 11 percent indicated a willingness to work directly as escorts. A decade ago, only 3 percent answered in the affirmative. Today's respondents are far more likely to have peers who are working in the industry.

This sounds exactly like the kind of relationship I would want as well. But I've yet to find someone that fits that description. I just got out of a relationship.

It wasn't the reason the relationship ended but I think I will definitely be more cautious of future relationships. I wouldn't mind companionship. I feel the same way.

At least, I think I do. I've only recently identified myself as an asexual, so the whole thing is kind of new to me. Once a bond of trust is established, I enjoy cuddling, hugging, and chaste kissing. But as soon as it gets sexual I become uncomfortable. I want to find a partner with whom I can be affectionate, but not sexual. Someone who is willing to walk through life with me hand in hand. A union of souls, if not bodies. Current college student here. I've started 'officially' dating a friend I've had here for over a year we've been moving in this direction for quite a while a couple months ago.

Since we're both in fairly demanding majors, on the physical side our relationship has been moving pretty slow. We've made out some, but haven't gone much further than that. A year ago I never would have imagined myself being comfortable with that kind of thing, but because I trust him so completely these small steps have been easy to take.

At first I found french kissing rather disgusting, but I warmed up to it. It's an expression of emotional intimacy and trust to me, more than anything. It was mentioned a long time ago while we were friends that I identified as an asexual. I don't think he exactly understands what that means or doesn't quite believe me; I'm not sure. It hasn't been brought up since and I don't intend to any time soon. I'm not opposed to having sex, but if I find it too uncomfortable we may have to have a discussion about what that means for us.

I don't see us heading there particularly soon though. What you want to me sounds like a very typical relationship without sex.

Personally, I think you might be looking a little too long-term to start out with. Asexuality need not even be brought up to start with. I think you should look for a relationship with someone you care about, who respects you enough to be willing to take things slow.

Also, the perception that all college student relationships are centered around sex is I think over-stated. A lot of people are looking to wait until marriage or at least until the relationship is much more established. If I hadn't met this boy, I wouldn't be dating now. Sometimes, even if you want companionship, the right person just isn't in your life at the moment. I would look for people you have strong connections with and take any relationship on a case-by-case basis. Each situation and each person's needs will be unique.

Once someone has a history and connection with you, they may be more willing to compromise than when they first met you. This relationship has been the easiest thing in the world for me.

We enjoy talking and have enough other things that interest us about one another, than we need not push towards the sexual when either of us is uncomfortable. This sounds ideal to me too. I have always wanted to have really super close friendships, not a lot of friends, but with those few special people I want to be really cuddly and affectionate and free to be open and intimate and know that we share commitment to eachother, but no sexual interest.

Now, I have always wanted to get married and be a mother and I am married, not a mom yet though but sex was never a big part of what I hoped for or imagined, for having kids sure, but other than that it's not what I'm looking for, but I do want the sense of unity and commitment, and I enjoy the romance even if I could also live without it. Before I met my husband, I felt like I could be happy and content living the rest of my life with my best friend until work issues and personality clashes ended up tearing the whole thing apart in a really scarring way but I won't go into that, we have since repaired our friendship though we don't live together anymore, obviously since I have since then married someone else.

We were roommates for a long time, and were probably a lot closer than many people typically think of as friendship. We never thought of ourselves as being in a 'relationship', we didn't think of it as typically romantic, but it's likely that it looked that way to other people. I would have enjoyed being even more affectionate with her than we were, but she's not really a touchy feely person, and doesn't go in for 'mushy' stuff at all, so I did feel pretty special that she would actually be that way at all with me.

In any case I definitely think that kind of relationship is possible! Also as another example to encourage you, we have some 'family friends' who are two ladies who did room together in college and though I think they may have dated some other people in the past neither of them ever got married and now they are in their 50's I think and have bought a house together and I'm sure they'll be together for the rest of their lives, but it's pretty clear they're not a romantic couple neither of them seem like terribly romantic people to begin with anyways , they're just best friends.

I am so happy that I grew up with their example of what a good friendship can be like! So I guess anyways, take heart! Asexual Relationships Search In. Help fund AVEN's servers! Archived This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Ten Dollar Founding Father. Posted February 15, Maybe I'm just confusing the two; I'm not entirely sure anymore. Share this post Link to post Share on other sites.

I feel the same way you do. The relationship you described is the same kind that I long for.

She's received over $90, for education-related costs, but says the they provide companionship or foster a mentor-mentee relationship. Essentially, what I've been thinking of is a companion. Yes Perhaps what you' re looking for is a romantic partnership or romantic friendship?. A companion premise is that, overall, higher education will change only marginally Education faculties will continue to look inward to their own campus and to.