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Discussion in ' Politics ' started by Wildlife , Apr 14, Log in or Sign up. Apr 14, 1. April 11, Things just went from bad to worse. But first some good news. Last night, lame duck Speaker of the House Cliff Rosenberger announce that, due to an FBI corruption investigation into his tenure as Speaker, he would be stepping down effective May 1, As expected, Representative Henne was incapable of defending the bill and incapable of explaining how disarming law-abiding citizens and destroying due process will make anyone safe.

Like Governor Kasich, Representative Henne and Chairwoman Anielski, Senator Eklund is lame-duck , only introducing this legislation because he cannot run for reelection.

Their bill, Senate Bill , appears to be a word-for-word duplicate of HB, opening up a completely new line of attack on our gun rights from the Senate chamber. As you know, both HB and SB would destroy due process for gun owners and allow for gun-confiscation by declaration rather than adjudication.

They would also expand the size and scope of the Federal gun-owner database, enabling government to categorically deny firearms rights to even more veterans returning home from overseas.

Ohio Gun Owners is already exposing these shenanigans in the districts of every Republican member of the House Committee using targeted social media, email and direct mail campaigns. The only force strong enough to stop these outright assaults on our freedoms is us, the thousands of law-abiding gun owners across Ohio.

Wildlife , Apr 14, Buck Buster and Richard Scherff p like this. Apr 14, 2. Will this be a new trend? Again, how will these new "Gun-Control" proposals stop something like this Apr 14, According to Grove City Police, the year-old suspect was arrested Friday and charged with two counts of aggravated robbery. Investigators say the teen is one of four suspects involved in two armed robberies on April 6. Police are still trying to identify the other three suspects at this time.

The two robberies happened within about 15 minutes of each other. The first was on the block of English Turn Drive just before 9pm on April 6. The victims had just arrived home and parked their car in the garage when three unknown males approached them.

Two of the suspects were carrying guns. The suspects took a laptop and a cell phone during the robbery. The victim told investigators she had just returned home and parked her car when four males approached her. At least two of the suspects had guns. The suspects took her purse, cell phone and keys to her vehicle.

Columbus Police say the two robberies are connected to a similar robbery that happened the morning of April 7 in German Village. Grove City Police say there are a few things you can do to protect yourself: If you are in a vehicle and believe you are being followed, do not go home or stop if they continue to follow you.

Call and continue driving towards the nearest police station. The dispatchers will give you information on what to do. Always be alert and aware of your surroundings while both inside and outside of your vehicle.

Check around you before you exit a vehicle and know where a safe area is near you. Even if you do not think what you saw is important, let law enforcement make that determination. Anyone with information about the robberies or the identities of the suspects is asked to contact Grove City Police at Buck Buster likes this. Apr 14, 3. Anyone can makeup a sensational, exaggerated, untrue complaint towards you with impunity, unless you're willing to spend plenty of money to defend yourself.

If this has never happened to you, then consider yourself lucky! Don't kid yourself if you think that this kind of protection order won't be abused or weaponized towards the poor, the vulnerable and the innocent. A judge makes the determination to issue the order based on statements and actions made by the gun owner in question. Apr 15, 4. How Ohio stacks up compared to other states and what is happening regarding gun-related legislation since the aftermath of the Parkland, Fla.

There are visual aids and a complete list of all the states within the original version of the article. Click the source link to see just how Ohio stacks up The backdrop to these changes is a geography that shows strong gun rights in the South, West and Southwest and stronger gun control on the coasts coming into an election year with 36 governorships in the hands of voters. Control of state government There are 25 states where Republicans hold the governorship and majorities in the state House and state Senate while Democrats hold the trifecta in seven states.

Eighteen states are split between parties. Those dynamics, plus 36 governorships and all but four state legislatures, are up for election in are the backdrop for these debates. The Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence has published a gun law scorecard since and ranks states on the strength of gun laws by giving points for gun safety policies and giving negative points for laws it deems dangerous.

What states have done since Florida shooting The Tribune surveyed news reports from around the country to glean the latest movements in the gun debate on the state level. Some of these situations change daily. John Kasich proposed a range of gun law changes, including a ban on armor-piercing ammunition; forcing stricter compliance deadlines and penalties around entering data into the national background check system; prohibiting those targeted by domestic violence protection orders from buying or possessing firearms; and clarifying Ohio's prohibition on "strawman" third-party gun purchases.

Guns and Ammo ranking: Wildlife , Apr 15, Apr 16, 5. Certainly disturbing R's are proposing these bills. I am torn on who to vote for Governor in the next election. Taylor has her wagon hitched to Kasich who I"ve never liked and Dewine seems to be cut of some of the same cloth only becoming more friendly to the 2nd amendment when it suited his needs. Buck Buster and Bryan six like this. Apr 16, 6. Bryan six , Apr 16, Apr 16, 7. A friendly reminder about this weekend's Patriots rally. Certainly one way to get the latest scoop on who is supporting who come election day.

Both my wife and I will be in attendance. Something I never have done before quite honestly, however these recent attacks on our basic freedoms have pushed me to the point that I felt the need to stand with my fellow patriots and show my support.

I hope to see a magnificent crowd of proud passionate Americans come Saturday! Hear historical information on the role private ownership of firearms played in our country's founding. Hear immigrants talk of their experiences with freedom before coming to this country and their experiences now. Hear young people, the future of our great country, speak about why freedom is so important to their generation.

Wildlife , Apr 16, Apr 16, 8. Apr 17, 9. The Gun Control Act of originally required ammunition dealers to be licensed and to record ammunition sales, similar to the requirements that continue to pertain to sales of firearms by licensed dealers. Firearms must bear mandatory markings and unique serial numbers, however, which at least allow investigators to trace them back to the original retail purchaser to generate leads that may help explain how guns came to be diverted to criminal use.

Requiring similar markings for every round of ammunition sold, however, would be prohibitively expensive, if not altogether impractical. And without such markings, ammunition would be virtually impossible to account for after the first retail sale. This helps explain why the original record-keeping requirements were considered useless and why re-imposing ammunition controls would be a waste of time. Simply put, criminals could and would violate the requirements easily and with impunity.

Meanwhile law-abiding dealers and purchasers would be saddled with gratuitous paperwork and all the problems inherent in the current background check system, including delays, false positives, and the laborious and lengthy process of correcting erroneous or incomplete information. The Act would also effectively ban direct online ammunition sales, the most affordable option for those who use large amounts of ammunition in training and competitive shooting. The bill might also make sharing or borrowing ammunition at a range or on a hunt effectively illegal.

It would also likely re-impose dealer licensing for ammunition sellers, with all the expense and ATF bureaucracy that entails. Ammunition background checks are such a bad idea, in fact, that even the most antigun jurisdictions have generally avoided them. One Northeastern state enacted a law to require them, to much fanfare, but then quietly abandoned the effort without ever actually implementing the requirements. Out West, another state is in the midst of trying to figure out how to implement its own recently-enacted law, with absurdities such as mandatory fingerprinting of non-residents seeking to buy ammunition while visiting the state.

Little surprise Wasserman Schultz now seeks redemption among her party peers through the introduction of opportunistic and ill-considered gun control legislation.

Her backward-looking bill, however, would only burden legitimate firearm-related commerce while doing nothing to hinder criminals. Wildlife , Apr 17, Apr 17, In case you're not aware, today is the day that can be life changer for many Ohioans. Term-limited State and Local Government Committee chairwoman Marlene Anielski is the lieutenant charged with ramming this legislation through committee. And of course, term-limited Governor Kasich is the Supreme Commander behind it all, calling the shots and pulling the strings.

This is bad news.

Gnadenhutten Massacre - Ohio History Central

If this has never happened to you, then consider yourself lucky! Don't kid yourself if you think that this kind of protection order won't be abused or weaponized towards the poor, the vulnerable and the innocent. A judge makes the determination to issue the order based on statements and actions made by the gun owner in question. Apr 15, 4. How Ohio stacks up compared to other states and what is happening regarding gun-related legislation since the aftermath of the Parkland, Fla.

There are visual aids and a complete list of all the states within the original version of the article. Click the source link to see just how Ohio stacks up The backdrop to these changes is a geography that shows strong gun rights in the South, West and Southwest and stronger gun control on the coasts coming into an election year with 36 governorships in the hands of voters.

Control of state government There are 25 states where Republicans hold the governorship and majorities in the state House and state Senate while Democrats hold the trifecta in seven states. Eighteen states are split between parties. Those dynamics, plus 36 governorships and all but four state legislatures, are up for election in are the backdrop for these debates. The Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence has published a gun law scorecard since and ranks states on the strength of gun laws by giving points for gun safety policies and giving negative points for laws it deems dangerous.

What states have done since Florida shooting The Tribune surveyed news reports from around the country to glean the latest movements in the gun debate on the state level. Some of these situations change daily. John Kasich proposed a range of gun law changes, including a ban on armor-piercing ammunition; forcing stricter compliance deadlines and penalties around entering data into the national background check system; prohibiting those targeted by domestic violence protection orders from buying or possessing firearms; and clarifying Ohio's prohibition on "strawman" third-party gun purchases.

Guns and Ammo ranking: Wildlife , Apr 15, Apr 16, 5. Certainly disturbing R's are proposing these bills. I am torn on who to vote for Governor in the next election. Taylor has her wagon hitched to Kasich who I"ve never liked and Dewine seems to be cut of some of the same cloth only becoming more friendly to the 2nd amendment when it suited his needs. Buck Buster and Bryan six like this. Apr 16, 6. Bryan six , Apr 16, Apr 16, 7.

A friendly reminder about this weekend's Patriots rally. Certainly one way to get the latest scoop on who is supporting who come election day. Both my wife and I will be in attendance.

Something I never have done before quite honestly, however these recent attacks on our basic freedoms have pushed me to the point that I felt the need to stand with my fellow patriots and show my support. I hope to see a magnificent crowd of proud passionate Americans come Saturday! Hear historical information on the role private ownership of firearms played in our country's founding.

Hear immigrants talk of their experiences with freedom before coming to this country and their experiences now. Hear young people, the future of our great country, speak about why freedom is so important to their generation. Wildlife , Apr 16, Apr 16, 8.

Apr 17, 9. The Gun Control Act of originally required ammunition dealers to be licensed and to record ammunition sales, similar to the requirements that continue to pertain to sales of firearms by licensed dealers. Firearms must bear mandatory markings and unique serial numbers, however, which at least allow investigators to trace them back to the original retail purchaser to generate leads that may help explain how guns came to be diverted to criminal use.

Requiring similar markings for every round of ammunition sold, however, would be prohibitively expensive, if not altogether impractical. And without such markings, ammunition would be virtually impossible to account for after the first retail sale.

This helps explain why the original record-keeping requirements were considered useless and why re-imposing ammunition controls would be a waste of time. Simply put, criminals could and would violate the requirements easily and with impunity.

Meanwhile law-abiding dealers and purchasers would be saddled with gratuitous paperwork and all the problems inherent in the current background check system, including delays, false positives, and the laborious and lengthy process of correcting erroneous or incomplete information. The Act would also effectively ban direct online ammunition sales, the most affordable option for those who use large amounts of ammunition in training and competitive shooting.

The bill might also make sharing or borrowing ammunition at a range or on a hunt effectively illegal. It would also likely re-impose dealer licensing for ammunition sellers, with all the expense and ATF bureaucracy that entails.

Ammunition background checks are such a bad idea, in fact, that even the most antigun jurisdictions have generally avoided them. One Northeastern state enacted a law to require them, to much fanfare, but then quietly abandoned the effort without ever actually implementing the requirements.

Out West, another state is in the midst of trying to figure out how to implement its own recently-enacted law, with absurdities such as mandatory fingerprinting of non-residents seeking to buy ammunition while visiting the state. Little surprise Wasserman Schultz now seeks redemption among her party peers through the introduction of opportunistic and ill-considered gun control legislation. Her backward-looking bill, however, would only burden legitimate firearm-related commerce while doing nothing to hinder criminals.

Wildlife , Apr 17, Apr 17, In case you're not aware, today is the day that can be life changer for many Ohioans. Term-limited State and Local Government Committee chairwoman Marlene Anielski is the lieutenant charged with ramming this legislation through committee.

And of course, term-limited Governor Kasich is the Supreme Commander behind it all, calling the shots and pulling the strings. This is bad news. This entire bill was created under cover of darkness. In fact, Representative Henne even refused to release it for cosponsorship beforehand and is the SOLE author of the bill! This bill is being fasttracked at lighting speed, and you and I need to stop it — NOW.

As you know, this bill is a 6-pronged attack on our gun rights, but it keys in on two major areas that gun owners need to focus on. It totally destroys due-process for gun owners. Knight, and others ran to the community's blacksmith shop as planned. About thirty-five church men were on hand. They immediately called for quarters and urged their wives and children to flee for safety. Stunned women and children ran in every direction.

Jenning's men approached from the west, north and east of the shop. The only direction for flight was to the south or southeast, with the millpond blocking part of that retreat. The shortest way to safety was across the milldam. Amanda Smith and her girls ran to the bank of the stream, down a few feet and onto the plank walkway. Bullets splattered all around them, splashing into the millpond. Upon the attacker's first advance, Mary Stedwell raised her hands pleading for peace.

Instead, she was shot in the hand. Seeing no other recourse, she ran for cover on the opposite bank of the creek. Mary fell behind a log, but her attackers continued to fire at her exposed clothing. Afterward, over twenty bullets were found in the log. While women and children sought cover in streambed and distant forest, the blacksmith shop turned into a death trap for defenders.

David Evans swung his hat and cried for peace. Nehemiah Comstock fired in return, then, as one, the attackers discharged their rifles into the blacksmith shop.

Wide spaces between logs provided little protection as withering fire from the guns of more than attackers concentrated on the men in the building. David Lewis wrote, "The first man that fell was Simon Cox, he was standing close by my side when he received the fatal blow, he was shot threw the kidneys, and all the pain and misery I ever witnessed a poor soul in him seemed to excell [sic].

Ellis Ames' wife, Olive, left her own detailed account of the tragedy, written in , " Rial Ames my husband's brother and Hyrum Abbott were sitting just outside the door, one cutting the other's hair, they rose from the chair and remarked. It's the mob right on us I rushed out of the house David Evans made a second attempt to end the attack. He and Nathan Knight ran out of the building pleading for a truce.

Knight was shot in the hand. When it was clear the attack would continue, Evans and Knight ran toward the creek for safety. Knight received two more wounds but escaped by running up a hill on the south side of the stream. Evans covered the same distance unharmed. Attackers overwhelmed the defenders, closing into a tight half circle around the shop. Daniel Ashby, one of the regulators, moved in to secure the structure. Defender Ellis Eames wrote, " Seeing no prospect before us but death, the mob manifesting all malice possible and would not listen to our cries and seemed determined to murder us all, we thought it advisable for us to make our escape.

Abbot received a fatal wound as he left the doorway. Lewis was wounded in the shoulder but survived. Still inside the shop, George Myers raised his hat on a gun, drawing the fire of a nearby sharpshooter.

Myers shot back and ran from the shop. He received a shot in the right shoulder, but made his way across the milldam to the safety of his house a mile from the mill. Inside the shop John Walker was hit with a ball in his right arm.

Unable to reload he and another defender took out for the field. They ran down the bank of the creek. On the way up on the other side, his companion was hit. Walker hid under some lumber standing along side the creek bank.

Thomas McBride was shot as he made his escape from the shop. Olive Ames recalled, "No sooner had I concealed myself Ames, and old Father McBride ran past hunting a place of concealment Isaac Laney crossed the creek above me. The mob saw him and began firing. I saw him fall, then rise and climb the hill.

McBride tried to surrender to Jacob Rogers of Daviess County, but Rogers shot him in the chest and slashed McBride's head, face and shoulders with a corn knife, leaving him lying in the creek. While running for his life, Jacob Myers, Jr.

Rogers proceeded to also attack Myers, but a Missourian stopped him saying, Myers had "ground many a grist for him. About this time, David Lewis also fled from the shop.

Lewis planned to surrender, but being in the line of fire, he went down the creek bed and waded over to Haun's house. From there he headed south to his own house one-quarter mile away. They left the shop under fire at close range. Though wounded, Leany ran to the mill, climbed down the timbers and waded the creek to Haun's house.

Women gathered at Haun's hid him under the floorboards. Jacob Potts was shot twice in his right leg, but made it to David Lewis' house, borrowed a horse and rode home. William Yokum fell wounded just past the milldam. Meanwhile, Benjamin Lewis made it across the creek, up a hill and, thinking himself safe from the action on the field, climbed upon a rock fence to watch. A sharpshooter named Rockholt picked him off from yards. Women later found Benjamin Lewis in the woods. He was taken to David Lewis' home where he died.

David Lewis buried him near his house. Benjamin was later reburied, perhaps in what is today known as White Cemetery. The Missourians stopped firing after the last group of Mormons left the shop. Inside regulators stripped the wounded and dead of their clothing and boots. Three boys were found hiding and were shot. While some succeeded in escaping with their lives, seventeen defenders were killed outright or mortally wounded.

Charles Merrick was wounded as he ran outside after being found hiding in the shop and died weeks later. Alma Smith was severely wounded in the shop but recovered. William Chaplin remained in the shop but was uninjured by playing possum.

Three Missourians were injured in the affray - John Hart, from Livingston County was wounded in the arm, John Renfrow had a thumb shot off, and Alan England, of Daviess, was severely wounded in the thigh. John Hammer - After the darkness of night had come on, the brethren who were in hiding began to make search for those who had been killed and wounded. My father was found and carried into Haun's house, where he died about 12 o'clock that night.

During that night they kept up the search as well as the darkness would permit, but were only able to find the wounded by their groans. All they were able in this manner to find were taken into Mr. Haun's house as soon as possible so as to be protected from being torn or mangled by the hogs with which the woods at that place were full. Margaret Mann Foutz - I hurried on to find my husband.

Jacob Foutz I found him in an old house covered with rubbish. The mob had taken the bedding and clothing from al the houses that were near the mill. My husband was shot in the thigh. I rendered him all the aid that I could but it was evening before I could get him home.

I saw thirteen more dead bodies at the shop and witnessed the beginning of the burial which consisted in throwing the bodies into an old dry well. So great was the fear of the men that the mob would return and kill what few men that were left that they threw the bodies in head first or feet first as the case might be.

When they had thrown in three my heart sickened and I could not stand it more. I turned away to keep from fainting. My husband and another Brother drew dead bodies on themselves and pretended to be dead and by so doing saved their own lives and heard what the mob said. After the firing was over two little boys that were in the shop begged for their lives, but 'No,' they said, 'Damn them, they will make Mormons.

Here were my friends dead and dying. One in particular asked me to give him relief by taking a hammer and knocking out his brains, so great was his agony from his wounds, and we knew not what moment our enemies would be upon us. In the evening Brother Evans got a team and wagon and conveyed my husband to his house, carried him in and placed him on the bed. I then had to attend him alone, without any doctor or anyone to tell me what to do for him. Six days after, I and my husband together, extracted the bullet, it being buried deep in the thick part of the thigh and flattened like a knife.

The day ofter the massacre, David Evans and others of the survivors took refuge in a thicket on Brother Nortons farm. To them in the company of her mother, Melissa carried provisions until peace was restored. Abraham Palmer The next day after the aforesaid outrage a company of the mob came to him and brethren and said if you will deny your faith you can live with us in peace but if you will not you must leave the Country forthwith on pain of death for we will exterminate all of you that do not deny your faith men women and children.

On Tuesday the thirtieth day of October being absent from home at the House of Mr Walker, while their a man came up and told us that the mob had come to the Mill and that they had Shown no Quarter, and that they intended to Sweep Shoal Creek.

That evening I Started to go to the mill and proceeded Some distance I met Some Families in the Woods who had fled from the Slaughter they persuaded me not to go any further that night So I Consented to Stay with them. We all Slept in the Woods that night without any beds or any thing to Cover us with excepting two women This was Melissa and Elizabeth Norton who had brought Each of them a quilt.

They told me to go and look into the Shop I immediately went to the Shop and Saw Seven men and one boy lying dead amongst whom was my Father who was shot through the head and through the heart Three more I found lay dead near the Shop and Several more reached Some houses and Soon afterwards died, in all there were Eighteen killed Sixteen men and two boys.

Ellis Eames - Early in the morning a few of us got together and interred the dead in a hole which had been dug for a well, and then we went and hid in the hazel brush, expecting the mob would probably be coming to massacre the remainder. Some came, but they did not appear so hostile, but satisfied themselves with carrying off 2 or 3 horses. James McBride A few rods south of the blacksmith shop, was an unfinished well, about eight or twelve feet deep; but no water was in it.

This made the sepulchre for the dead. Fifteen murdered persons, including my father, were carried on a board, one at a time, and dropped into that well--by brother Amos McBride, James Dayley and Jacob Myers: Willard Smith - We were forbidden to call the family together for prayers or even to pray vocally alone.

This Godless silence, Mother said, she could not stand, so one day, she went down into a corn field and crawled into a shock of the corn which had been cut. After carefully ascertaining that no one was within hearing distance, she said she "Prayed till her soul felt satisfied.

That soul, 'though all hell should endeavor to shake, I'll never, no never, no never forsake. From that moment Mother said she had no further fear of the mob, and she inspired us children with faith that if we conscientiously did right, the Lord would shelter us from harm.

A few days after the same company came and pretended that General Clark had sent them to take prisoners and send them to Richmond jail. They took me prisoner and kept me in close confinement for nine days and would not let me converse with any one. They then took possession of my mills and ground up all the wheat and corn and took it home to their families and after taking about all the spoil they could and killed nearly all my hogs, they departed and left me at liberty and drove off the cattle, etc.

They went all around the neighborhood and threatened the lives of all the Mormons and ordered them out of the state upon pain of extermination. David Norton David Norton Jr. David Norton was born in Pendleton, Kentucky. He was baptized a member of the Mormon church Oct 1, He brought his family to Caldwell county, MO June of David Norton petition for redress of damages for loss suffered in Caldwell county, Missouri Sworn to before W.

He was endowed 30 Dec in the Nauvoo Temple. They were sealed 6 Feb Oliver Walker - Lived in Randolph county. He purchased land in , very early. Oliver moved his family to Caldwell, Missouri in On 29 September , " After crossing Shoal Creek, they camped on the west bank, fifteen miles inside the border of Caldwell County, "on the farm of Oliver Walker, who gave each family a pumpkin and plenty of shelled beans.

Today we felt like we had arrived in Zion. Disagreement among elders Seymour Brunson explains the purpose of the conference is to resolve a difficulty among the elders in the Winchester branch.

Issue of common stock Henry Jackson: He and Isaac Follis interpreted certain passages in Acts and in the Book of Mormon differently than the church. They believe the disciples lived in common stock.

Date November 30, Misrepresented letter Elders agree unanimously that the problem was due to "misrepresentations of a writing which was represented to have been written by br.

Henry Jackson to make public apology Oliver proproses to restore Henry Jackson to his former standing if he admits his error to the branch "for which he was sorry in all humility. Case of George Heartly vs Oliver Walker. Finally Walker did agree truely humble himself. Sidney Rigdon presiding, who opened by prayer. The Council was organized as follows: Jared Carter, Joseph Smith Senr.

McLellin for Samuel H. Elder Walker was called to make such remarks before the Council as he thought proper who related a difficulty which formerly existed between himself and George Hartley, once a member of the Church in Winchester.

Four councillors were appointed to speak on the case viz.: Jared Carter Joseph Smith Senr. Oliver Cowdery Orson Hyde. The circumstances of Elder Walker's former difficulty were stated by himself. Elder Levi] Hancock, President Cowdery who presided over the conference at one time when said difficulty was settled [December 6, , in Winchester, Indiana.

The councilors then made their remarks and also Presidents F. That Elder Walker is, and has been a member of this Church, and that he is and has been an Elder in the same. And that so far as has been presented to this Council, nothing has been done by him whereby he ought to be expelled from this Church. A vote was called which was unanimous with said decision. The charge against Oliver Walker was taken up, and the following substituted for the first charge: For and in behalf of said Church, I prefer a charge against Elder Oliver Walker, for several different offenses hereinafter set forth, as said to be by him done, performed, said, and committed, as well as various duties omitted, all of which was done at different times, periods, places, and seasons, subsequent to September 1st, A.

Likewise for advancing ideas, notions, or opinions, that the different orders or sects, namely, Methodists and others, could by a pursuit in their faith, order, and pursuits, as readily obtain every celestial attainment and Gospel advantage, as they could by embracing and pursuing the system brought forth by Joseph Smith, Jun.

Dated October 11, , Nauvoo. Walker pleaded that he was not prepared to defend himself, and the trial was deferred at his request till April conference. The companions were in Winchester Randolph County, Indiana during July and August and there they "raised a large branch of the Church", in addition to baptizing about one hundred others, including one of George Washington's bodyguards, in nearby Ward township: We saw there a school master and introduced the Gospel to him He was so well pleased with the message that he spread the news as fast as possible and called a meeting.

After the meeting he wanted to be baptised, so we went to the water with him and baptised him. Soon after this we were happy to hear that nearly all the people want to hear us so we went to the court house and got permission to hold a meeting there.

After this meeting we were able to baptise several others. But we were among friends and we were serving the Lord with the faith that he would take care of us.

As I was ready to leave she gave me a pair of warm socks. The first thing I ever had given to me in my life, to my remembrance; and if l had had the means to pay her I should have offered to pay her.

Pratt once let me have a Book of Mormon and before I could pay for it he was gone, I read it once and then someone else got it, I was not used to having anyone give me anything, Zebidee and I held another meeting and after we were through I was informed that one man brought some cloth for me, some pants and a shirt.

This was in the forepart of July. We continued to preach here in the region and around about, until we had raised a large branch of theChurch. We went there and in a short time we had in both places about one hundred members. Among them was a man by the name of Jones and his wife. He told me that he was through the Revolutionary War, that he was a bodyguard once for General Washington, He told me many things about the war, which was very interesting, I told him my message, and we discussed the Gospel for some time then he asked for baptism and I baptised him.

Afterwards he said he had something for me. He had saved a watermelon on purpose for me so he now went and picked it. It appeared to do him good to see me enjoying the watermelon, as if he were feeding an angel.

He was so thankful to be baptised and felt the spirit of the Lord with him, I had no Elder with me at this time. It was almost dark and I was crossing the public square, I saw a company of men standing at the tavern door talking when one man came up to me and wanted me to stop.

He handed me a letter. It read as follows: We have been reading your new Bible and find it to be a piece of nonsense and we understand you are looking after the New Jersualem. We inform you it is not here; and you must leave this place before tomorrow atthen 10 o'clock or we will have something to reveal to you far beyond the Book of Mormon. You may take Mr. Brindle with you Mr. Brindle was the first one we baptised there If you have any use for such an ass to pack your religion on.

He said, "I'll stay and fill our appointment if you will? We had put our meeting off until eleven in order that the farmers could come to it. The next morning Sunday came and we were prepared for the worst. It was my turn to speak and I sang too. Zebidee gave the prayer. Bill Walker placed himself at the door and looked as surly as a bull; he was my friend. He said nothing, but something said to me, that I should not be hurt.

So I commenced talking and soon forgot myself and said what came to my heart. I mounted the bench and walked in among the same crows who had written that letter.

I said, "You wrote to warn me to leave this place before then, but you see I am still here. What I said before this I know not. I was heated up, until I cared little what came. I said, "My Father fought for liberty you now enjoy and you want to deprive me of the liberty that rightly belongs to me. I am a son of the only man who survived the great struggle for independence, who belonged to the family, and I am a cousin to the first man who signed the Declaration of Independence.

Now If you want to reveal anything to me, come on, I am ready. Nothing was said so I sat down and Zebidee then took hold of the subject and gave a good sermon. He opened the door for baptism. We felt the spirit of the Lord there with us. After the meeting we went to the water and baptised seventeen out of that crowd, who the day before were going to mob us.

It Is now In the month of August that I made this last account. Jones showed me his cornfield and cut down one stalk that measured one rod. It was the tallest corn I had ever seen. I think there was none in the field any longer.

This was on a branch, he says, on the head waters of the Wabash. I took a route through the country with a brother by the name of George Burket and was called upon to preach a funeral sermon for a child who had died. I did not know what to do for I had never done this before but I trusted the Lord and did the best I could. I did not know that a gospel sermon would do and I liked to have been backed; but I believe the people were satisfied. Brother Burket bore his testimony.

I wanted Zebidee along, but he was in Winchester. We left here and went to Muncetown, and held a meeting. Afterwards we went to Winchester where we found Zebidee sick so we did not start on our journey until about the first of September.

We stopped In Muncetown and held meeting, then continued our joumy west. We made a little raise of money and was determined to reach Indianapolis as soon as we could. We did not attempt to preach much on the way, until we felt better as we were both of us nearly worn out speaking. Austin and Nancy Elston Hammer had six children whose names were: The son Josiah was born in Ohio where they lived for three years. They then moved to Henry Co.

From here they went on to Shoal Creek, Caldwell Co. They had a farm and title to acres of land. Austin Hammer and 18 other men and boys were killed on 30th October while guarding Haun's Mill to keep the mob from burning it. This was a grist mill for ginding corn. The dead were put into a dry well and covered with dirt, as the mob was so bad no one dared to go there and give them a proper burial. John Hammer, the oldest son, about 14 years had to hide in the woods for some time in fear of the mob.

During the time a man came to the house wearing a hat with a bullet hole in it and boots belonging to John York who had been killed. After the death of Austin Hammer, his wife took her family of six children and went to Nauvoo, Illinois. Their outfit consisted of an old blind horse and an old wagon.

The baby Julia and small boy Austin, who was sick, were the only ones to ride. Only two of the family had shoes. The others tied their feet up in rags and made the journey of miles in the latter part of November and December , to Nauvoo.

They remained there until Spring and then went to Wayne Co. Then they moved to La Harp Co. They remained there 5 years. In the fall of they crossed the Mississippi River and remained there over the winter. In the spring of they went to Council Bluffs where there was a large encampment of L. Hammer I am on the Haun's Mill track just now. Father talked of it and would express how he felt about getting revenge. He told me that he would crawl on ice and snow for a mile to get a shot at one of that Haun's Mill mob.

Well, the opportunity came for him to kill one of the mob. It occurred while he was in the standing army, today it is known as the U. National Guard his company was pitching camp close to Carson City, - the time Carson was just a little more that a stage depot.

While father was busy putting up his tent, a man came up to the captain of the company and asked him if he had any Mormons in his Company.

The stranger then inquired, "Do you know if you have any of them who had any killed at Haun's Mill? Why, what do you want to know for? But just at that moment the Lord let him see into the very inner parts of the stranger's soul, and father told me that there wasn't words that could describe the condition of this man's suffering and as father stood looking at him he said, "I've been looking all this time to find a relative of one of those I helped kill, so that I could die at the hands of one of their relatives.

Now I want you to kill me for I am powerless to kill myself, and for them I helped to kill, I hear their groans all day long. I have no rest day or night and I see their forms all night. He said, "I'll not harm one hair of you head. From that day on father did not seek any revenge for he felt that the Lord was doing a much better job of it than he could do.

John Pye was born in SC around They took up land in the wilderness of Indiana in Shelby county where they pioneered until John's death in They had 5 children, two of whom lived to maturity,. Wm Henry Pye - Campbell Co. John and Lydia Pye traveled to Indiana near Indianapolis from old Youtsey family journal - they were in Missouri before the period you discussed with some Mormon involvement, then returned to Indiana. At the age of twenty-five years Mr. He first went to Ohio, lived ther ten months, and then went to Wayne County, Ind.

In September, , he was married to Lydia M. Another son of Isaac is Alma, who accompanied his parents to this county, as above related. His father entered eighty acres of land at a time when wild game was very plenty.

He erected a hewed log house, in which lived the family consisting of parents and ten children. Alma was born in Pike County, Ill. When twenty-two years old he embarked in life for himself, by farming a tract of land he owned on section 16, of Cass Township. He was married August 24, , to Sarah M. Ellison joined the re-organized church. Melissa Norton Allred's obitutary. She was the daughter of David Norton and Elizabeth Benefield. Click for a larger image.

She died July 26th She with her parents joined the church in an early day and moved from Indiana when twelve years old to the State of Missouri in President A 0 Smoot's company; settled near Haun's mill; shared in the persecutions of the Saints and came near being in the Haun's mill massacre. Her father and family gathered to the mill for proteetion the night previous to the massacre.

To them in the company of her mother, the deceased carried provisions until peace was restored. Many other other incidents of kindness peculiar to sister allreds disposition might be mentioned, but space will not permit. Next through the exterminating order of Governor Boggs the family were compelled to flee into the state of Illinois. They participated in the persecutions in Nauvoo, the enemy being continually on their trail.

It was at the last mentioned place that the deceased became the wife of P. Allred February 3rd, She with her husband shared the hardships peculiar to this barren uncultivated region, suffered many times for want of food and clothing, but dividing their scanty means with their friends and also the Indians.

In the fall of Sister Allred and family located in Lehi city, Utah county where they resided until the time of her death.

She had been a perpetual sufferer for nineteen years, never at any time being free from pain. But she possessed a powerful constitution and struggled along through all these years of affliction. It has been a mystery to those acquainted with her how she survived so long. She was of a kind motherly disposition, imparting ofher substance with the poor and destitute.

She never could do too much for suffering humanity. The day she died she remarked that she had not felt so well during all her past years of her affliction. The day previous to her death she walked yards to see the procession on July 25th. In the afternoon she went to son, James Allred's to dinner with her friends. On the day of her death she arose in the morning, ate her breakfast, did her house work partook of dinner and afterwards wresumed work about the house.

She finally laid down upon her bed to rest when suddenly she called to her husband and remarked that she was He went to her assistance whereupon she be closed her eyes and passed away without a struggle. Thus departed an honest noble daughter of god to await the morn of the first resurrection. Too much cannot be said of her kind hearted husband for unceasing and untiring efforts during her years of affliction to comfort his wife. Sister Allred was the mother of eight children 6 sons and 2 daughters two of whom preceded her behind the viel.

She leaves a husband six children thirty five grand children and a wide circle of friends to mourn her departure. The funeral services were held at the family residence at 4 p m on the afternoon of the 28th of July. Bishop T R Cutler presiding brother William Goates offered the opening prayer, brother J L gibbs and his aides rendered some exellent singing appropriate to the occasion, brother T R Cuttler, William Clark, E H Davis and Israel Evans spoke in eulogistic terms of the deceased and offered consoling remarks to the relatives and friends.

At 5 pm the remains were conducted to their last resting place followed by a large concourse of people. The dedicatory prayer at the grave was delivered by Bishop Cutler. At this time, however, there was another mob collecting on Grand river, at William Mann's, who were threatening us, consequently we remained under arms.

Monday passed away without molestation from any quarter. On Tuesday, the 30th, that bloody tragedy was acted, the scene of which I shall never forget. More than three-fourths of the day had passed in tranquility, as smiling as the preceding one.

I think there was no individual of our company that was apprised of the sudden and awful fate that hung over our heads like an overwhelming torrent, which was to change the prospects, the feelings and the circumstances of about thirty families.

The banks of Shoal creek on either side teemed with children sporting and playing, while their mothers were engaged in domestic employments, and their fathers employed in guarding the mills and other property, while others were engaged in gathering in their crops for their winter consumption.

The weather was very pleasant, the sun shone clear, all was tranquil, and no one expressed any apprehension of the awful crisis that was near us-even at our doors. It was about four o'clock, while sitting in my cabin with my babe in my arms, and my wife standing by my side, the door being open, I cast my eyes on the opposite bank of Shoal creek and saw a large company of armed men, on horses, directing their course towards the mills with all possible speed.

As they advanced through the scattering trees that stood on the edge of the prairie they seemed to form themselves into a three square position, forming a vanguard in front.

At this moment, David Evans, seeing the superiority of their numbers, there being two hundred and forty of them, according to their own account , swung his hat, and cried for peace. This not being heeded, they continued to advance, and their leader, Mr.

Nehemiah Comstock, fired a gun, which was followed by a solemn pause of ten or twelve seconds, when, all at once, they discharged about one hundred rifles, aiming at a blacksmith shop into which our friends had fled for safety; and charged up to the shop, the cracks of which between the logs were sufficiently large to enable them to aim directly at the bodies of those who had there fled for refuge from the fire of their murderers.

There were several families tented in the rear of the shop, whose lives were exposed, and amidst a shower of bullets fled to the woods in different directions. After standing and gazing on this bloody scene for a few minutes, and finding myself in the uttermost danger, the bullets having reached the house where I was living, I committed my family to the protection of heaven, and leaving the house on the opposite side, I took a path which led up the hill, following in the trail of three of my brethren that had fled from the shop.

While ascending the hill we were discovered by the mob, who immediately fired at us, and continued so to do till we reached the summit. In descending the hill, I secreted myself in a thicket of bushes, where I lay till eight o'clock in the evening, at which time I heard a female voice calling my name in an under tone, telling me that the mob had gone and there was no danger.

I immediately left the thicket, and went to the house of Benjamin Lewis, where I found my family who had fled there in safety, and two of my friends mortally wounded, one of whom died before morning. Here we passed the painful night in deep and awful reflections on the scenes of the preceding evening. After daylight appeared, some four or five men, who with myself, had escaped with our lives from the horrid massacre, and who repaired as soon as possible to the mills, to learn the condition of our friends, whose fate we had but too truly anticipated.

When we arrived at the house of Mr. Haun, we found Mr. Merrick's body lying in the rear of the house, Mr. McBride's in front, literally mangled from head to foot. We were informed by Miss Rebecca Judd, who was an eye witness, that he was shot with his own gun, after he had given it up, and then cut to pieces with a corn cutter by a Mr. Rogers of Daviess county, who keeps a ferry on Grand river, and who has since repeatedly boasted of this act of savage barbarity. York's body we found in the house, and after viewing these corpses, we immediately went to the blacksmith's shop, where we found nine of our friends, eight of whom were already dead; the other, Mr.

Cox, of Indiana, struggling in the agonies of death and soon expired. We immediately prepared and carried them to the place of interment. The last office of kindness due to the remains of departed friends, was not attended with the customary ceremonies or decency, for we were in jeopardy, every moment expecting to be fired upon by the mob, who, we supposed, were lying in ambush, waiting for the first opportunity to despatch the remaining few who were providentially preserved from the slaughter of the preceding day.

However, we accomplished without molestation this painful task. The place of burying was a vault in the ground, formerly intended for a well, into which we threw the bodies of our friends promiscuously. Among those slain I will mention Sardius Smith, son of Warren Smith, about nine years old, who, through fear, had crawled under the bellows in the shop, where he remained till the massacre was over, when he was discovered by a Mr. Glaze, of Carroll county, who presented his rifle near the boy's head, and literally blowed off the upper part of it.

Stanley, of Carroll, told me afterwards that Glaze boasted of this fiend-like murder and heroic deed all over the country. The number killed and mortally wounded in this wanton slaughter was eighteen or nineteen, whose names as far as I recollect were as follows: Thomas McBride, Levi N. Among the wounded who recovered were Isaac Laney, Nathan K. Miss Mary Stedwell, while fleeing, was shot through the hand, and, fainting, fell over a log, into which they shot upwards of twenty balls.

To finish their work of destruction, this band of murderers, composed of men from Daviess, Livingston, Ray, Carroll, and Chariton counties, led by some of the principal men of that section of the upper country, among whom I am informed were Mr.

Bryon, clerk of Livingston county; Mr. Randall, and many others , proceeded to rob the houses, wagons, and tents, of bedding and clothing; drove off horses and wagons, leaving widows and orphans destitute of the necessaries of life; and even stripped the clothing from the bodies of the slain.

According to their own account, they fired seven rounds in this awful butchery, making upwards of sixteen hundred shots at a little company of men, about thirty in number. I hereby certify the above to be a true statement of facts, according to the best of my knowledge. State of Illinois, ss. We laid little Alma on a bed in our tent and I examined the wound. It was a ghastly sight. I knew not what to do. Thou seest my poor wounded boy and knowest my inexperience.

Oh, Heavenly Father, direct me what to do! Our fire was still smouldering. I was directed to take ashes and make a lye and put a cloth saturated with it right into the wound again and again I saturated the cloth and put it into the hole, and each time mashed flesh and splinters of bone came away with the cloth; and the wound became as white as chicken's flesh.

Having done as directed I again prayed to the Lord and was again instructed as distinctly as though a physician had been standing by speaking to me. Near by was a slippery-elm tree. From this I was told to make a poultice and fill the wound with it the poultice was made, and the wound, which took fully a quarter of a yard of linen to cover was properly dressed.

I removed the wounded boy to a house. I was reminded that in my husband's trunk there was a bottle of balsam.

This I poured into the wound, greatly soothing Alma's pain. Then I laid him comfortably on his face, and said: So Alma laid on his face for five weeks, until he was entirely recovered-a flexible gristle having grown in place of the missing joint and socket, which remains to this day a marvel to physicians.

It is now nearly forty years ago, but Alma has never been the least crippled during his life, and he has traveled quite a long period of the time as a missionary of the gospel and [is] a living miracle of the power of God. On the 15th day of August, , I moved from Far West to Haun's Mill, 16 miles from the former place, with a quantity of merchandise intending to keep store in that place; having settled there, and liking the country very much, I purchased a saw mill from Mr.

Myers, and in the spring Mr. Myers and son and I built a grist mill which was furnished that season. All things continued to move on well; the inhabitants behaved themselves very friendly and purchased goods from and used my mill for grinding and sawing.

This continued until the disturbances broke out in Daviess County, when I observed from the conversation that they did not like the proceedings of our brethren. However, they seemed to be kind as usual to me and the rest of our people, who were in the immediate neighborhood. As the disturbances increased, and the excitement prevailed they partook of the same spirit and some threats were made by them of burning the mills.

Thinking they would be protected in that place from the mob whom they feared would soon fall upon the brethren who were settled in Caldwell, these men who had left nearly all their property behind them agreed with the inhabitants amongst whom they had gone to reside to give them half of their stock, if they would drive it home for them.

Accordingly, about eighteen or twenty came for that purpose, but did not content themselves with driving off the property of the individuals, but likewise drove off two cows belonging to Gilman Merrick and several young stock from me. At the time they were coming they met a man by the name of Miller who was on horseback; they took his horse from him.

A few days after this Mr. Isaac Calkin had a beautiful span of horses which he secreted in the corn field, for fear the mob would steal them, but notwithstanding this precaution they succeeded in finding them and took them away.

The next important transaction that took place was that a company was raised on Grand River, but without any legal authority whatever and came to our neighborhood and took a quantity of guns from our people. When they came up to my place I immediately went up to them, conversed with them and asked what was their object in the strange move they were making.

One of them named, Molsey, told me that they were taking the guns from the Mormons, wanting to put a stop to the damned fuss. One young man named Hiram Abbot who was with me, and with whom I was about making arrangements to put up a store, who had a gun with him was told to give up his gun, but he refused, knowing they had no authority for such strange proceedings, when several of the mob while on their horses immediately cocked their guns and took aim at him, but did not fire.

Three of them then dismounted viz: Hiram Cumstock, Trosher, and Whitney and pursued after him across the mill dam -- he got up to the side of a hill and Cumstock got by the side of the house, Comstock then drew up his gun and snapped it three times at him, but without effect; his gun would not make fire.

Abbott seeing that, cocked his gun, but Comstock got behind the hen house and screened himself from danger. Abbott then made his escape as fast as possible. The mob then rode off. Very soon after it was reported that they intended to come and burn the mills. On receiving this intelligence the neighbors assembled together to consult what was best to be done, and after some deliberations it was agreed that there should a few remain at the mill to guard it from the attack of any individuals who might feel disposed to put their threats into execution, and from that time there were generally some of the men about the mills in order to protect it, it being their chief and only place where they could get any flour or meal.

The mob understanding that we had made such a movement, sent word to us that they wished to meet a committee of our people and have an understanding of each other's movements and expressed their wish to live in peace and friendly terms with us.

We immediately sent a committee who met them at the house of Mr. Myers, and after a short interview and explaining to them the object we had in view and that we desired to live in peace, and they separated both parties seemed satisfied and manifested a kind spirit. The committee on the part of the mob were Samuel S. After this interview we felt more satisfied, having, as we thought, a perfect understanding of their intentions, but at the same time we thought it best to keep up a watch at the mills--for fear any individuals might come privately and burn them.

About this time a number of movers from the East came up, intending to settle in that section of the country, but had not determined where. They stopped a few days at the mills and purchased some provisions until they should find a place to settle. We continued to hear of mobs in different directions, but at the same time we felt ourselves measurable safe after being given to understand by the committee from Capt.

Mattison's company that they would not molest us, if we were peaceable, etc. On the 31st of October things moved on as usual, we were occupied in our usual occupations and heard of nothing to increase our fears and were in hopes that soon such proceedings and alarm would cease and we should again enjoy the blessings of liberty and peace. The day was far spent; the sun was sinking fast in the western hemisphere, being only about an hour and a half high.

A number of us where at a short distance from the mill between it and the blacksmith's shop when one observed there was a mob coming, and immediately we saw a large company of between and within about one hundred yards from us. Thinking their movements were hostile, we immediately ran into the blacksmith's shop, for safety. Some of our brethren had camped a little behind the shop; one of them by the name of Knight, had just taken up his gun and was going down to the small lake for the purpose of shooting ducks when the mob came upon him.

One of their leaders named Comstock observing him immediately fired upon him and shot the strap off his shot pouch. He then ran into the shop whither we had taken shelter, the mob then kept rushing on towards the shop and shooting at us.

David Evans then ran out and called for peace and solicited them to desist. Knight also went out again and joined him supplicating for peace, but all to no effect; they continued to fire upon them and shot Brother Knight in the hand, taking off one finger and disabling another, he then retreated towards the mill to cross on the dam, when he was shot in the back, the ball lodging in the pit of his stomach.

The women seeing our situation and expecting no better treatment took to flight, taking their little ones along with them and running away from a scene of murder, which it is impossible to portray. As the mob approached nearer the shop, indeed if we had all been armed it would have been impossible for us to have resisted them took deliberate aim through the cracks and the shop being crowded almost every ball that entered the shop took effect and every moment some one was exclaiming, "Oh, I am shot," and first one and then another kept sinking down upon the ground, writhing in agony, while the blood flowed from their wounds and steamed upon the floor.

One young man standing immediately next to me was shot, seeing no prospect before us but death, the mob manifesting all malice possible, and would not listen to our cries, and seemed determined to murder us all, we thought it advisable for us to try to make our escape by running out of the shop and cross the mill dam. Those of us who were able ran out and endeavored to make our escape in doing which as many were shot down while making the attempt and the mob firing upon us all the time as long as we were within reach.

The mob then rushed into the shop where the wounded and dying were laying and those in whom the spark of life was not extinct were then shot over again. A little boy about nine years old who had hid himself under the bellows being observed and on being threatened to be shot, he earnestly desired and prayed for them to spare him, plead for his life, but to no purpose, for a muzzle shot gun was placed to his head and his brains were literally blown out, another little boy was likewise shot and died soon after, still another was shot, but has survived.

One old gentleman who was immediately behind, named Thos. This was demanded by his pursuer, he immediately turned round and delivered it up. The monster then took a corn cutter which he had by his side and cut the old man into pieces. Some of the women were shot. Merril's clothes were cut in two or three places with bullets and a young woman named Mary Studwell who was running away, at a distance from any one else was shot through the hand.

Hearing the balls whistling by her she took shelter behind some logs which screened her from the balls as several lodged in the logs. After they had finished their bloody work, the mob next commenced to plunder, and seeing some teams standing by belonging to the movers who had lately come along, they loaded the wagons with our goods.

They entirely stripped me of all my clothing as well as my wife's and the clothes belonging to a young man who was boarding at our house, and all our bed clothes and beds likewise a quantity of merchandise which they carried away.

Nor did this satisfy them, but those who were murdered were then robbed of their clothes, watches and everything else of value. The mobbers took their booty to Grand River and there made a distribution of the spoils amongst themselves.

I went about two miles and hid in the Hazel brush and then returned with Mr. Blackburn about ten O'clock at night. I went amongst my friends who had been shot, and those who had been wounded, I assisted all I could and administered to their necessities, and early in the morning a few of us got together and interred the dead in a hole which had been dug for a well, and then we went and hid in the hazel brush, expecting the mob would probably be coming to massacre the remainder.

The names of those who were killed were as follows: The names of the leading characters who took part in this outrage and inhuman butchery were as follows: These acted without any authority and committed all these murders, and robberies, yet none of them have been brought to punishment. The affair was left without investigation and the poor afflicted broken-hearted survivors left without any redress.

The above is one account of the Massacre at Haun's Mill. Champlin feined their selves dead and lay still untill their pockets were robed and after they supposd the wounded all were all dead they robed the houses took the horses from the mill and out of the stables and two waggons from the mill and off they went for the night but on the first or seccond of Nov they returned and camped at the mill robed that plundered the neighbourhood taking offsuch things as they pleased mob law being established in this band ofrobers murderers and thieves was Wm.

From a personal history of unknown origin in the possession of Robert S. The history consists mostly of John Hammer's account. He was born in the state of South Carolina, May 6, , and obeyed the gospel in in Henry County, state of Indiana.

He moved to Clay County, Missouri, where he stayed a short time and soon after settled in Caldwell County, and made a cash entry of acres of land and raised one crop of corn. His farm was within three or four miles of Haun's Mill, both situated on Shoal Creek. In the fall of , the mob threatened to burn this mill because it ground grain for the Mormons, and all the mills in that section of the country, controlled or owned by the mob party, refused to grind for them, hoping by so doing to starve the Mormons out.

In consequence of these threats, a few of the brethren assisted in guarding the mill. This duty they had performed for several days and nights.

The best Ohio oddities and offbeat attractions, road trip and vacation recommendations from Roadside America's writers and experts -- museums, statues, roadside stops, odd buildings, weird folk art. home: The Indiana Mormons at the Haun's Mill Massacre Haun's Mill was named after Jacob Haun, a member of the Church, who built a mill on Shoal Creek between and In October , there were an estimated 75 families living there, although there were only perhaps a dozen or so houses along with a blacksmith shop and a mill. The Kent State shootings (also known as the May 4 massacre or the Kent State massacre) were the shootings on May 4, , of unarmed college students by members of the Ohio National Guard at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, during a mass protest against the bombing of Cambodia by United States military www.siliconirelandnewswire.com-eight guardsmen fired approximately 67 rounds over a period of 13 seconds.