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Penny Thibault got up around 6 a. It wasn't unusual for Sean, 32, to crash with his brother Dennis in Burlington. They would sometimes stay up all night playing video games or horsing around. But Sean almost always remembered to call or text his mom.

Dennis, 34, didn't pick up his phone, either. Initially, they were relieved to discover Sean's car parked out front and the porch light on. They figured their boys had probably just overslept. But when they opened the door to the screened-in front porch, the Thibaults found both sons, slumped over within a few feet of each other. Their bodies were blue.

Penny and Jerry tried to revive the two, shaking them, pounding their backs, trying to get them to breathe. A FedEx driver making deliveries nearby heard the parents' screams and called Had they been shot, or stabbed? But there was no blood. Maybe it was carbon monoxide poisoning?

But both boys were outside. An officer who later arrived told the Thibaults matter-of-factly: She never suspected that her sons took drugs. Dennis and Sean had looked healthy. They had good, full-time jobs and never missed a day of work or a family gathering.

Neither had ever been arrested or hinted about a struggle with drug use. Fourteen months later, their sudden deaths make no more sense to Penny. The only thing that seems clear to her is that the dealer who provided her sons with what turned out to be fentanyl — a synthetic opiate sometimes sold as heroin, though it is 50 times more powerful — should be held responsible for their deaths and sent to prison for a long, long time.

The Thibaults waited more than a year for authorities to charge the dealer they believe sold their sons the drug. Earlier this month, he pleaded guilty to a drug charge after reaching a plea agreement in U.

District Court that effectively granted him immunity for any deaths he may have caused. There was no mention of Sean or Dennis. A few hours later, Penny sent a long, anguished email to numerous Vermont media outlets, chronicling her own discoveries and frustrations.

It was a detailed account of her quest for justice. I don't think there's any question they've been held accountable. But they're not the only ones involved, and I don't know any justice that targets only half of those responsible. Penny Beauregard and Jerry Thibault met in Burlington when she was just They eventually married and settled in Richmond, where they raised three boys.

Gerald, the eldest, later moved to Seattle, while Sean and Dennis stayed closer to home. Theirs was the house where all the neighborhood kids hung out.

But the Thibaults had family adventures, too. They went hunting together and attended concerts and ballgames. Jerry made enough money as a machinist to afford camping trips to Lake George, N. They graduated from Mt. Mansfield Union High School within a year of each other and immediately started careers.

Although inseparable, the boys couldn't have been more different in their interests and temperaments. He talked excitedly about space travel and the possibility that humans could eventually reach Mars.

A football fan, he got into computers and sought out and paid for training that landed him an IT job at Husky Injection Molding Systems , a plastics manufacturer in Milton. He never turned down a friend's request to fix a computer or any other electronic device and usually refused anything but a nominal payment. Sean was grumpier, or least appeared to be that way to people who didn't know him. Family members called him the "albino rhino" for his spirited, sometimes reckless personality, and joked about the dangers of provoking him.

Sean followed in his father's footsteps as a machinist. For a few years, they worked together at Whitetail Manufacturing in Williston before the younger Thibault moved on to Milton-based Rennline, which makes car parts and other equipment.

All of us Thibaults do. Dennis left home in his early twenties and eventually found an apartment on leafy Ward Street. Sean chose to live at home, which guaranteed home-cooked meals, free laundry and steady companionship. According to his mom, he used to come home from work, wrestle with his dad and ask, "What's for dinner?

Just two weeks before their deaths, the boys joined the extended family clan for a party in memory of their deceased grandmother. During the festivities, Dennis and Sean taught their young cousins to play poker. Relatives recalled their entertaining brotherly banter. A doctor, a lawyer, a husband, a wife, your best friend — your nephew? In this case, it might have been a roommate. Thibault family members didn't discover until after the brothers died that Burlington police had twice been called to Dennis' address for heroin overdoses, and neighbors had complained repeatedly about suspicious activity on the property.

In December , the cops raided the place and arrested a man living there. They later charged him with selling heroin. Her own research since has led Penny to believe her sons were at least dabbling in drugs at that time.

Their friends from Richmond told her of parties involving prescription meds. She said she has medical records that indicate Sean mentioned a possible opiate problem to his doctor as early as But there's no evidence that he ever got treatment for it.

It's been more than two years since Gov. Peter Shumlin devoted his entire State of the State address to Vermont's opiate "crisis. The state counted a record 76 fatal overdoses last year, and that number is on pace to increase in In response, the state has refashioned how it views drug users. The Department of Health has revamped and expanded addiction treatment options.

The judiciary has tried to create court programs to help addicts instead of punishing them. Law enforcement and health officials have bought thousands of doses of the opiate-reversing drug Narcan: Last week, Shumlin announced that Vermont pharmacies would be allowed to sell the drug without a prescription. But as the state has taken a gentler approach to drug addicts, officials have urged a tougher one in regard to drug dealers, particularly those who sell substances that are tied to overdoses.

In Bennington County, prosecutors took the unusual step of charging a drug dealer with second-degree murder after he allegedly sold heroin laced with fentanyl to a man who fatally overdosed.

The February decision to file the murder charge against Trevor Shepard may be unprecedented in Vermont. It was based on evidence that Shepard had previously warned customers that the heroin could include fentanyl, Seven Days reported earlier this year. Another, seldom-used statute is also available to prosecutors: Some overdoses fall into multiple categories, so totals in each category don't necessarily add up to the overall totals. Numbers include accidental and undetermined causes of death, but exclude suicides.

Faucette had been arrested in April in Massachusetts after troopers allegedly found him with a "large amount" of heroin during a traffic stop. In December, the U. Attorney's Office invoked the federal version of the death-resulting law against two Brooklyn men, Gary Delima and Sharif Cargo.

They were accused of selling fentanyl to a year-old South Burlington man who fatally overdosed in July , according to federal court documents. Delima and Cargo are also facing charges of engaging in a conspiracy to sell cocaine and heroin in Vermont and engaging in sex trafficking.

Other states are acting more aggressively than Vermont in targeting dealers connected to overdoses. In December, the New Hampshire Attorney General's Office announced an initiative to treat most overdoses as major crimes and has pursued at least 40 investigations.

The office has taught local police to treat overdose scenes as murder scenes and asked state lawmakers to free up funds for a specialized overdose prosecutor. New Jersey launched a similar program, while lawmakers in West Virginia, Pennsylvania and New York passed laws specifically targeting dealers connected to fatal overdoses.

Some, of course, will. You hear this buzzword, 'You can't arrest your way out of the problem. Not everyone in the legal community wants to lock up peddlers of product that causes overdoses. Someone sells me a highly dangerous substance and I use it in the manner that I intended to use it, are they responsible for my death?

We seem to say 'yes' in the drug context. In the rhetoric of hammering drug dealers, many hear echoes of failed "tough on crime" strategies that have filled U.

Twenty-five percent of the world's inmates are incarcerated in America. Would a dealer, who theoretically is already risking decades in prison for simply selling drugs, really stop if the possible penalty were higher?

I'm not sure passing a law that imposes more punitive consequences for folks who dispense or sell drugs is going to stop drug dealing. Further complicating legal matters: Drug dealers, especially those who are based in Vermont and serve as middlemen between local customers and out-of-state networks, can defy easy stereotypes.

Many are themselves desperate addicts who sell a little on the side to fund their own habits.

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So he has to take high levels of meds to keep his body safe. She Googled Zucker only once her family had gotten to know him and was shocked by the criticism she read; she says he has been supportive of her approach and has never encouraged her to treat Alex like a girl. With encouragement from Zucker, Andie reminds Alex that he could grow up to be anything—a girl, a boy, or anything in between—and tries to encourage him in any case to love his body.

He goes snowboarding and dirt biking with his mom. In advance of Thanksgiving, Andie called her own mom—who is slowly coming around—to lay out the ground rules for their family dinner: Zucker was bending down, hands on his knees, to look at the newly loose tooth Alex was excited to show off. While countless individual therapists work with transgender kids on an individual basis, there are only about a dozen clinics for transgender kids and adolescents at major medical centers in the Western world.

But none attempt to actively prevent transsexuality as Zucker does. With short silver hair and beard, mismatched belt and shoes, and a perpetual pen stain on his shirt pocket, Zucker looks, and has the demeanor of, the workaholic grandfather that he is. The first thing you notice, talking to him, is his voice: Its deep basso timbre rumbles in a blend of Canadian and Midwestern accents. He has a dry sense of humor and a penchant for deadpan teasing that at times catches even friends off guard.

Zucker grew up in suburban Skokie, Illinois, the older of two kids his sister Barbara, he points out with an ironic smile, is nicknamed Barbie. Born in , Zucker came of age at the dawn of a different kind of scene. He regards his detractors as dogmatists.

He thought that by studying these boys early in life, he could watch their cross-gender identities unfold, like caterpillars in chrysalises. Most of them—75 percent—grew up to be gay men. Subsequent studies led to similar findings: Gender-bending kids who grow up to be transsexual adults are the exception, not the rule. This may be changing. Recent studies indicate that the number of people seeking treatment at gender clinics in the United Kingdom and Canada has risen sharply in the last five years.

New data might help to answer this question. During the time I was in Toronto, Zucker talked a lot about a scholarly paper currently under review by a group of well-respected Dutch clinicians and researchers.

Herb Schreier sees the same data and reaches the opposite conclusion: The kids who transition early, he says, are the ones who identified themselves vocally and from an early age—the ones who were clearly going to persist anyway. In the vast majority of these kids, however, gender dysphoria resolves on its own. In light of that, I asked Zucker, how do you know your interventions are working? But this was the early s—there was no early gender transition subculture—and Bryant was growing up in a small farming town about an hour from Los Angeles.

Bryant liked Green and remembers trying hard to please him. Bryant wrote his Ph. Bryant grew up to be a happy, successful gay man, and he refuses to speculate how, or whether, things would have been different if his parents had allowed him to follow his fervent childhood wish to be a girl. That said, developmental and cognitive psychology are much more sophisticated now than they were then, and Zucker says that the theoretical underpinnings of his work rely on much of this new research.

The world consists of males and females: You look to the social environment. Take something as seemingly arbitrary as color preferences.

In general, girls like pink and boys like blue. OK, so what do girls do? I can do something else. Zucker also relies on more traditional behavior--modification therapy, in which you reinforce or reward certain behaviors and ignore or discourage others.

For a kid like Olivia, he felt comfortable going further. Olivia is nine now. She refused to go to school on her birthday, because the teacher gave girls a princess crown to wear on that day. By the time Olivia was four or five, they would argue about her gender constantly. Erin was referred to Zucker by a therapist she was seeing, but having read some of the criticisms of him online, she was wary. But then Zucker asked her a question that stuck with her: What do you think about that?

The first thing Zucker encouraged them to do was to go shopping for clothes. Zucker is mindful that clothes and hair length—not to mention toys and games, indeed, just about every outward sign of gender that he targets—are superficial.

And I think, in young childhood, there can be a feedback effect. If a young boy feels he is a girl, Zucker argues, then playing with Barbies is not as simple or as neutral as playing with blocks or puzzles. Part of the thrill of the Barbies for that boy is that they make him feel like a girl. Because he feels like a girl, he will continue to want to play with Barbies. Kids conflate identity with appearance.

This was certainly true for Olivia. Even though originally that was what she wanted. They were accused of selling fentanyl to a year-old South Burlington man who fatally overdosed in July , according to federal court documents.

Delima and Cargo are also facing charges of engaging in a conspiracy to sell cocaine and heroin in Vermont and engaging in sex trafficking. Other states are acting more aggressively than Vermont in targeting dealers connected to overdoses. In December, the New Hampshire Attorney General's Office announced an initiative to treat most overdoses as major crimes and has pursued at least 40 investigations.

The office has taught local police to treat overdose scenes as murder scenes and asked state lawmakers to free up funds for a specialized overdose prosecutor. New Jersey launched a similar program, while lawmakers in West Virginia, Pennsylvania and New York passed laws specifically targeting dealers connected to fatal overdoses.

Some, of course, will. You hear this buzzword, 'You can't arrest your way out of the problem. Not everyone in the legal community wants to lock up peddlers of product that causes overdoses. Someone sells me a highly dangerous substance and I use it in the manner that I intended to use it, are they responsible for my death? We seem to say 'yes' in the drug context. In the rhetoric of hammering drug dealers, many hear echoes of failed "tough on crime" strategies that have filled U.

Twenty-five percent of the world's inmates are incarcerated in America. Would a dealer, who theoretically is already risking decades in prison for simply selling drugs, really stop if the possible penalty were higher? I'm not sure passing a law that imposes more punitive consequences for folks who dispense or sell drugs is going to stop drug dealing.

Further complicating legal matters: Drug dealers, especially those who are based in Vermont and serve as middlemen between local customers and out-of-state networks, can defy easy stereotypes. Many are themselves desperate addicts who sell a little on the side to fund their own habits. Also, the key witnesses may be dead, or may have used more than one dealer, making it difficult to pinpoint where the drugs came from. Did they know it was mixed with fentanyl? It's all about intent and knowledge.

Among the local law enforcement officials who will likely have to grapple with the issue is Washington County State's Attorney Scott Williams. Over a mid-August weekend, Barre saw nine overdoses, including one death, from a batch of heroin suspected of containing fentanyl.

Speaking generally, Williams said that unless there is clear evidence that a dealer knew his or her product would likely lead to an overdose, such as in the Bennington County case, he would be unlikely to seek enhanced penalties for the dealer. If I thought there was any significant deterrent effect, that would be different. A couple of weeks after Dennis and Sean died, Burlington police returned their cellphones, laptops and other possessions to the Thibaults. The cops had little to say about the investigation and advised the family to remain patient.

Penny and Jerry tried something else: Desperate for answers, they had their eldest son, Gerald, who had flown in from Seattle after his brothers' deaths, use his computer programming skills to hack into his brothers' phones and computers in an effort to reconstruct what happened the night they died.

The family shared a partial transcript of what they say is a series of communications from Sean's cellphone. Then Sean made a phone call that lasted one minute to a contact in his phone known as Bobby Robidoux, according to the Thibaults' digital records. Sean then texted his brother. I called him and he said he is just up the road and should be back soon. Robidoux texted back at 7: Just be peasant sic it's worth the wait. Sean sent his last communication just 13 minutes later and didn't respond to any more incoming messages.

Dennis never sent another text or made another phone call. Seven Days could not independently verify the communications or confirm that the person listed in Sean's phone contacts and who participated in the text message exchange was in fact Bobby Robidoux.

After Gerald hacked into the phones, Penny started looking into Robidoux's background. She learned from Chittenden Superior Court records that the year-old former Richmond resident has a lengthy criminal record, including convictions for resisting arrest, escape, simple assault and driving under the influence.

In , Robidoux was charged with possession of heroin with intent to distribute after his probation officer found him with nearly five grams of heroin, according to court documents. He was sentenced to two years in prison after pleading no contest to an amended charge of drug possession, according to court documents, and scheduled to be released in May The Thibault family urged law enforcement to investigate Robidoux's connection to their son, repeatedly reaching out to Burlington police and the U.

Penny had face-to-face meetings with U. Attorney Eric Miller and other investigators, according to correspondence provided to Seven Days. Burlington Police Chief Brandon del Pozo declined to discuss the case in detail, beyond saying that the investigation into the Thibaults' deaths was "very thorough.

The Thibaults said they became frustrated as months passed and no one was charged with selling drugs to their sons. They hired private investigators and an attorney in hopes of uncovering more evidence. In January, federal authorities announced that Robidoux had been arrested on a charge of conspiring to sell heroin.

The federal indictment alleges that Robidoux and another man, Daniel Tucker, who was arrested in New Jersey, sold heroin in Vermont and elsewhere between June and August It does not provide details of their alleged operations. When Robidoux was arrested on January 28, the U. Penny says that she was excited about the news of Robidoux's arrest, and investigators urged her to hold tight in the months after he was charged.

Then, on July 25, Robidoux agreed to a plea deal with federal prosecutors. He would plead guilty to a charge of participating in a drug conspiracy, which carries a sentence of three to 20 years.

The deal includes a stipulation that Robidoux cannot be held legally liable "on the basis that death or serious bodily injury resulted from the defendant's distribution of heroin.

Robidoux has never been charged, or identified in publicly available court documents, as a suspect in the Thibaults' deaths. Attorney's Office apparently doesn't share the Thibault family's beliefs.

They don't have any evidence that will prove [their] allegations. Although he declined to discuss details, Miller said in a statement: I am extraordinarily sorry for the unimaginable loss Ms. Thibault and her family have suffered. But in this case, as always, we have made charging and plea decisions that are consistent with our very careful examination of all of the available evidence. Speaking generally, Miller also noted some of the complexities in trying to bring charges in fatal overdose cases.

And many use other dangerous substances as well. Our office is nonetheless committed to investigating overdose death cases and prosecuting them when we believe we can prove our case to a jury beyond a reasonable doubt.

On August 18, Penny went to federal court and watched Robidoux plead guilty to the drug charge. She later emailed several Vermont news outlets, including Seven Days , to make her case that the investigation into their deaths had been mishandled. The Thibaults suspect prosecutors cut a deal with Robidoux in hopes that he could help them convict more powerful dealers. He was one of just 67 members in the House of Representatives to vote against the Defense of Marriage Act, a politically tough decision he prides himself on and points to as a key progressive bona fide.

But his record on gay marriage is more complicated than he now makes it sound. While Sanders generally opposed measures to ban gay marriage, he did not speak out in favor of it until In addition, his reasoning for opposing efforts to restrict gay marriage was much narrower and legalistic than he now makes it seem.

When Sanders was asked on Sunday about his vote against the Defense of Marriage Act on CNN, he said that he believed back in that gay couples had the right to gay marriage. His wife and chief of staff Jane Sanders told an Associated Press reporter in July of that he opposed the law because it weakened the section of the Constitution that says states must respect laws that are made in other states. In , the Vermont Supreme Court ruled that the state had to guarantee protections and benefits to gay couples, a stop short of legalizing gay marriage.

Sanders approved of the decision.

Oct 28, In , the Vermont Supreme Court ruled that the state had to guarantee nominee, spoke out in favor of gay marriage, but Sanders kept mum. a man and a woman, Sanders spoke out against the Republican plan, saying it was The debate moderator wanted to know if Sanders thought the federal. Sep 11, Many of the women met Garland as high school or college students They believed his intentions were pure: He wanted to help, not harm. As Laura left home and began her freshman year at the University of Vermont, her Laura was enthusiastic about the prospect of meeting up with her mentor again. Aug 30, A female student at an elite prep school in New Hampshire who accused a convicted of misdemeanor charges, including having sex with someone below the age of consent. to comply with a 5 p.m. curfew at his mother's home in Vermont. . A New Option for N.B.A. Prospects: The Million-Dollar Intern.