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The Herald Press, Rochester, N. Corner of Main and Fayette Streets. The Palmyra Union Agricultural Society. Farm of William Avery Chapmwn. Purchased by the Mormons of Utah. Trouble between the Indians and Jenkins and his associates made an end to this Pennsylvania movement. John Swift bought out Jenkins and went to New England to encourage migration to his tract. During the summer of Swift returned to this then west and built a log house with a store house at the junction of the present Main and Canal Streets.

Before the close of the same year Webb Harwood, the second permanent settler, brought in his family from Adams, Massachusetts. Many families separate or in company closely followed.

Tiffany came from Wyoming. General John Swift ] 7 [ Image: Fast on them fol lowed mostly in bateaux -- twelve others of the Durfee family. The advent of Gideon Durfee was most opportune. He payed in coin for his 1, acres, thus [ Image: Site of First House. On Monday, April 4, , the colonists set sail on Heady creek, near Southampton, Long Island, for their new home five hundred miles to the north and westward.

It was a tedious trip with long, hard carries but was accom plished in twenty-eight days. Many a thrilling tale of conflict with the Indians or abounding wild animals is told. The former were so feared that a block house was begun on the brow of Wintergreen hill.

It was not finished for the victories of Mad Anthony Wayne set the pioneers at rest. Many a pretty romance was lived here in the woods. Clarissa Wilcox, daughter of David and Ruth Durfee Wilcox, went to the door to give a thirsty hunter a drink. Ambrose Hall returned to his home in Lanesboro, Massachusetts, but soon came back to 9 [ Image: Elm on Wilcox Farm.

For a short time the settlements in Tract 12, Range 2, were called after John Swift; then Tolland until January 4, , when a meeting was held to choose a permanent name. Daniel Sawyer, brother-in-law to Swift, was engaged to Miss Dosha Boughton, the first school mistress. He had been reading ancient history and had concluded if Zenobia had a Palmyra his queen should dwell there, too.

Therefore he pro posed the name, which was adopted. Palmyra East from Prospect Hill. Palmyra held her first town meeting and elected her first officers at the house of Gideon Durfee, in April, In Macedon was set off. Palmyra village was incorporated March 29, , while the first village election was held at the house of Lovell Hurd, Febru ary 4, , when the following officers were elected: Palmyra West from Prospect Hill. Beckwith and James White; clerk, Thomas P.

Baldwin; treasurer, William Parke; assessors, George N. On February 19 it was voted to buy an engine and ladders, and to provide water to be used in case of fire. That May twenty men organized a fire company, which has grown into the well equipped Volunteer Firemen of Palmyra with some eighty members, and with three organizations -- the Steamer and Hose Company, the Sexton Hydrant Hose Company, and the Protective Hook and Ladder Company. Palmyra postoffice was established in with Dr. Azel Ensworth the first postmaster.

The Doctor kept the first public house in the corporation. It stood on the site of the present Methodist church and was opened in In Louis Philippe of France stopped on his return from Niagara at the log tavern opened by Gideon Durfee where the George Townsend house now stands. The present Powers Hotel, built where a succession of hostelries have stood, was erect ed about by a company of public spirited men, who sold it to the genial host the late William P. As the Palmyra House he kept it nearly thirty years.

Robert Town, the earliest settled physician, was in Palmyra but a short time. As early as , possi bly before, he was succeeded by Dr. Gain Robinson 12 from Cummington, Massachusetts. Robinson desired counsel he sent to his old home for Dr. Bryant, father of the poet, who hurried here on horseback.

Robinson lived at the head of Main street where now resides Mr. In his office studied Alexander Mclntyre an allopath, and Durfee Chase, a homeopath -- afterwards local prac titioners. To-day doctors of both schools minister to the sick.

Palmyra's first lawyer was John Comstock. Jerome and Justice Theron R. Well equipped men have been and are to-day their successors. Zebulon Williams was the first storekeeper in a log house near the present Central station. The first emporium in the corporation was kept by Major Joseph Colt on the west corner of Main and Market streets.

Story, and many another successful business man. Edward Durfee and Jonah Hall operated the pioneer grist mill and saw mill. He was the pioneer silver smith, and introduced sewing machines in the community. To-day Palmyra boasts many good shops dry goods, hardware, jewelry, drug, grocery, and shoe stores. Different factories have been located here. At present the Globe Manufacturing Co. The Garlock Packing Company. Garlock, inventor of a packing for steam engines. The Crandall Packing Co.

The Triumph Packing Company. Since gas has been supplied to the village, while electricity was first furnished in The water system was installed in June 26, , seventeen men organized themselves as the Palmyra Union Agricultural Society, and held a three days fair that October. From then until the present, successful annual fairs have been held on the extensive, well kept Fair Grounds on Jackson Street.

This bank built and occupied until its failure in the offices and residence where now is the First National Bank.

The Palmyra Savings Bank, incorporated in April, , enjoyed a brief existence. Lyman Lyon and S. Gavitt carried on a private banking business from December, , until June, , when Lyon bought Gavitt's interest to continue alone until his death, in August, The Palmyra Bank, established by Pliny Sexton in , did business in the east section of the present Story store.

In April, , these houses were associated and. Cuyler, president; Pliny Sexton, vice president, and Stephen P. In this bank became the First National Bank with the following directors: Cuyler, pres ident; Pliny Sexton, vice president; Pliny T. Sexton, cashier; William H. The First National Block. The early paths through the forests have be come highways -- the first, Canandaigua road in John Swift, with others, cleared Ganargua creek to its junction with the Canandaigua outlet, and in it was declared navigable water.

This stream was the principal route until the opening of the Erie canal in The tumbled down collector's office on Canal street gives little idea of the business done by "Clinton's big ditch. It carried freight and it carried people.

When the packet approached a station a trumpet blared to set the town agog, the horses were put in a fast trot and with gusto drew the boat to the landing. Morris Huxley -- known to all as Dad Huxley -- drove the omnibus to the first train to stop here. For thirty-four years Dad's hearty greeting and 'bus welcomed all arrivals.

The omnibus service to the stations has been discontinued since the advent in of the Rochester, Syracuse and Eastern electric road, for this trolley does nearly all the local passenger business. Henry Wells, afterwards founder of Wells College, starting from Palmyra, carried parcels short distances in a hand bag. His business grew until it needed a horse and wagon.

This, merged with others, became the American Express Co. Henry Wells married his first wife -- Sally Daggett -- in the little weather beaten house that stands opposite Stafford street on the north side of Main street.

On November 26, , Timothy C. Strong sent out the Palmyra Register -- Democratic -- the first newspaper 28 in what is now Wayne County. Up to its end in this sheet often changed editors, names and politics.

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But our noblest fossil animal is the crocodile Young and Bird under "Fishes and Amphibia". Archosaurs [Wikipedia] , ancestors of birds and crocodiles, became the dominant faunas. Phytosaurs [Wikipedia] first appear during the Carnian. With many other large crurotarsan [Wikipedia] reptiles, they disappear at the end of the Triassic.

Internet Archive - offline. This one was discovered in Kansas. Pterosaurs meaning "winged lizard" were flying reptiles that existed from the late Triassic to the end of the Cretaceous.

See Dimorphodon - Stonesfield Slate - - - The Tethys sea developed between Laurasia north america, europe and asia and Gondwana africa southwards during the Jurassic Period.

The ancestors of our fir trees and the monkey puzzle tree. Observers Book of Geology and Wikipedia Timeline of plant evolution. Picture clip from J. Such is the picture of the lias" Wills p. Taylor 's "What the piece of jet had to say". See Lulworth forest and Hanover Point. Jet was popular after when Queen Victoria wore it following the death of Prince Albert.

The body but not the head of the Anning's find is lost. This drawing of a Ichthyosaurus fish lizard is from J. Associated with Saurians , especially Ichthyosaurus. See Cambridge Greensands - - - Anning - - - - - - - - Buckland named "fossil faeces Since Buckland, coprolite sometimes just means rounded lumps of fossilised material.

Dimorphodon [Wikipedia] was a medium-sized pterosaur from the early Jurassic Period first discovered by Mary Anning in The Sydenham display featured Pterodactyles from the Ooolite and one from a chalk pit in the Cretaceous. Steneosaurus bollensis previously Teleosaurus chapmani Konig fossils are found within Europe, including Germany, France and England.

The Whitby crocodiles are regared as such Teleosaurs. Thalattosuchia or sea crocodiles [Wikipedia] ,. The Stonesfield "slates" are limestones, originally deposited in a shallow sea. William Buckland obtained fossil bones from the quarries which later composed Megalosaurus , shown here dominating the Oolitic island at the centre of the Sydenham display.

To the right flew "Pterodactyles of the Ooolite", Buckland's Pterodactyle , found "pretty abundantly" at Stonesfield. In , Jane Francis named the dominant tree conifer Protocupressinoxylon purbeckensis Early cypress-wood from the Purbecks in an article now online. The reconsruction right is from the article.

See New occurrences of the wood Protocupressinoxylon purbeckensis Francis Generalised section across the Weal in south-east England, crossing the escarpments downs in the north, but following the Ouse valley in the south. From Wills p. Also see Bucks Geology Group. See Gateway to the Earth and dinosaurs. At the exhibition , a Pterodactyl dominates the chalk and two Iguanodon dominate the Wealden deposits.

Jukes-Browne, of the Geological Survey of England. Culver Cliff, Isle of Wight was photographed in , when I was twelve and it not yet a milion years old. The chalk ridge running along the centre of the island, from the Needles by Alum Bay on the west to Culver on the east, has younger rocks to the north and older ones to the south. Recently a few fossils of actual flowers have been added to the leaf collections. Clues from Nebraska and Kansas by M.

Pabian of the University of Nebraska shows a fossil flower from Rose Creek, Nebraska, with petals and stamens. Rather than call this Middle Tertiary "in I proposed the name of Miocene, selecting the 'faluns' of the valley of the Loire in France as my example or type".

The world never experienced a more beautiful period. That period was the Miocene, and by all manner of logical reasoning it was the time when man should have appeared" Mastodon, Mammoth, and Man by John Patterson MacLean page Picture of Miocene mammals from The Prehistoric World: Sommeone suggested Dryopithecus cracked the stones.

Histoire - See Mortillet. He named the monkey whose bones these were, Dryopithecus fontani [See below]. They were found in a strata of marly clays banc d'argile marneuse from the Miocene being exploited at the base of the plateau on which Saint-Gaudens is built,. Fontan recovered from the same site, bones of Macrotherium , Rhinoceros , Dicrocerus elegans , apparently identical to species of the same genera previously found at Sansan.

Lartet concluded on the evidence he had that this monkey, of very great size, mainly ate fruit, and lived usually in trees, as Gibbons of the present time.

He said he took the name Dryopithecus from [Greek] Dryos tree, oak and pithekos monkey. So Lyell is correct in linking the name to oaks found in lignite. Monsieur Fontan, after who the full name Dryopithecus fontani comes, is named as Urbaine Fontan in the Journal de Toulouse.

He may also be "A. The Journal de Toulouse carried to reports of the discovery the second correctin the first on 3. Fontan is reported as saying the find is the more interesting as Cuvier had not managed to find such a fossil. Flourens "went even further, this unexpected result gives him hope that one will soon find fossil men".

Plate and notes adapted provided with Lartet's note. The same series from an adult Chimpanzee - 3. Orang from Borneo - 4. Gibbon from Siamang - 5. Gorilla 7, 8, and 9 are Dryopithecus. Lartet says the Siamang , "placed by Zoologists in general in the last row of the tribe of the Simians or higher apes, nevertheless, provide by their skeleton, a sum of characters approaching the human type much greater than one can find in Orang or even in the chimpanzee ".

Geological periods of hominids. Eolithic means dawn of stone and the term eolith was used for flints that might have been hand wrought, but might be natural. This one is said to resemble a musk ox on the left and a bear on the right. European land mammals Wikipedia: Lindsay and others in wrote of "three major dispersal events of large mammals during the Pliocene" at 3,, years ago - then 2,, years ago - then 1,, years ago.

The land-mammal stage that spans the upper Pliocene and lower Pleistocene 3,, to 1,, years ago Oxford: A Dictionary of Zoology by Michael Allaby An age that is dated at base at approximately 3,, years ago. Early Villafranchian starts with appearance of a primitive bovid of the genus of Leptobos in Italy. Leptobos existed only during the Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene, thus it is a diagnostic taxon for the Villafranchian-Nihewanian land mammal ages of Europe and China.

The Etruscan rhinoceros Stephanorhinus etruscus was the European rhino from the early Pleistocene. It was succeeded the Steppe Rhino Stephanorhinus hemitoechus in the middle Pleistocene.

Elephant-Equus elephant horse event. It starts with the appeance of Equus real horse and Mammuthus meridionalis. Equus was derived from a species of the single-toed horse Pliohippus, known only from North America. The Wolf event, may fall near 1,, years ago.

The late Villafranchian starts with the appearance of Canis etruscus Etrurian wolf. Term introduced by Lyell in for ice age deposits after the Pliocene ]. Current ice age with permanent ice sheets in Antarctica and perhaps Greenland, and fluctuating ice sheets elsewhere. The ice across much of Russia preserved remains of Pleistocene mammals such as this mammoth from near Moscow whose mounted bones are diplayed in the entrance hall to the Orlov Museum of Paleontology.

The Woolly Rhinoceros also roamed Siberia. Paleolithic Old stone age. See stone and bone. The picture, from Wikipedia , is of an Acheulean handaxe from Zamora in Spain.

From Saint-Acheul , a suburb of Amiens where the first tools from this period were found in Acheulean The start of Antroparkbaby in the European Acheulean is based on the Bilzingsleben site of early palaeolithic human remains in Thuringia, Germany, dated about , years ago. Gabriel de Mortillet 's classification. Conceptualising pre-historic human time in Europe.

In prehistoric archaeology, Mortillet spoke, instead, of a fossile-directeur , which served the same function. The Fossile- directeur was a tool made by humans rather than a biological remain.

Lartet suggested four ages or periods based on associated fauna, to which Felix Garrigou added an earlier Hippopotamus period: Reindeer was divided into Solutrean and Magdalenian , and Robenhausian was added for the Neolithic period. Names of some periods of the paleolithic as classified by Gabriel de Mortillet. Aggsbach's Paleolithic Blog Tertiary. See eoliths and pre-mode tools Thenaisienne - Eolithique.

Picture 2 is an example shaped by fire. Picture 5 is an example with its edge bottom retouched by chipping. See mode one tools. The characteristic tool is often called an axe , but is a hand tool to cut, drill, trim and do everything. Mortillet calls it a coup-de-poing blow of the fist - punch or knuckle-fist. Mousterian flint tools in transition to Solutrean Two sides of one flint pointe.

Montillet notes the care and skill that has gone into shaping each side and comments that "this remarkable instrument approaches solutrean ". A pointe has been retouched along the length of one side bottom "forming a very beautiful scraper".

First part associated with mammoths, second with reindeer. Tool remains include two types of pointes, which, although not abundant, are characteristic. One type is laurel leaf shaped, the other willow leaf with a side notch. Artistic retouching on both faces, at both ends and at the perimeter, distinguishes them from Mousterian pointes. Later authors agree that the Solutrean represents the pinnacle of working flint and produced arrowheads of a perfection rarely equalled afterwards.

See mode four tools. Humans lived in caves for the most part. Asociated with reindeer throughout. Characterised especially by development of instruments in bone and antler.

It develops naturally from the Solutrean. Bone objects begin to appear at the end of the Solutrean and finely worked flint pointes are sometimes found in the early Magdalenian. But the use of bone harms the development of flint objects, which are less beautiful. A dagger carved from reindeer antler. Wikipedia At the end of the Paleolithic a warmer climate forced reindeer north.

Without this "animal heaven" the human populations of Western Europe lived in much more difficult times and stone industry declined. The shelter beyond Tourasse, close to Saint-Martory Haute-Garonne provides a good set of tools, characterised by harpoons. Characterised by small flints with geometric shapes. Mortillet says that "primitive" Pottery , for general use, appeared for the first time in Europe during the Robenhausian, having been completely lacking during the Quaternary.

The fist pots "vases" are crude. Only the surface is reddened by the fire. The interior of the pottery is coloured brown by the charcoal or black of smoke. It is usually mixed with angular fragments of rocks or shells. This mixture intended to give consistency to the clay and to prevent splitting during drying and while cooking. These bottoms of these first pots are rounded, without a flattened foot.

To stand upright they would have to be pressed into earth, sand or ash. Side nipples suggest suspension by cords. In geological time is Tertiary and Quaternary , until the start of the Neolithic in current time, which is marked by the polishing of stone tools. It was considered possible that hunter humans had simply been replaced by other humans who tilled the soil. It has been suggested seriously? The search for an alternative, develomental, process led to the two-stage theory becoming a three stage one with a Mesolithic middle stage.

Mortillet's research gap - the missing middle Mortillet: C'est ce qui constitue l'hiatus que nous constatons. The entire discussion, I believe, is based on a misunderstanding. Between the Paleolithic era or the caves and the time Neolithic or polished stone, there is a hiatus; but this hiatus is just a simple gap in our knowledge. It is not a real gap in time and in the industry. Certainly the Paleolithic era has had to be connected and merge in the Neolithic, but we have yet to discover the point of contact.

Between the two eras, there has not been a period where Europe was uninhabitable; only the remains of the epoch of transition or passage have not yet been found and recognized. That is the gap we see. I repeat, this hiatus is not a real one, but exists only in the results of our studies and our current research.

I owe this explanation because I am the main propagator of the idea of the hiatus. I pointed out the fact to stimulate research and investigations. The Tourassien later Azilian may have been suggested in and the Tardenoisien in The Tourassien and Tardenoisien industries were collated to form the Mesolithic period, which remained a controversial concept until after the second world war.

From the marxist approach of modes of production , the transition from the old stone age to the new was a transition from savagery to barbarism , and a transitional stage was not needed. Gordon Childe wrote that cultivating the soil "was the first step in the neolithic revolution, and suffices to distinguish barbarism from savagery" , p. The major change from the chart is two transitional epochs between the old and new stone ages. Carleton S Coon says his The History of Man begins about , years ago "at the beginning of the ice age".

But he also writes of the "Pleistocene or age of ice" between one million years and 10, years ago 8,BC. It was the period of homo erectus Java , Peking , Olduvai erectus and Rhodesian that evolved into homo sapiens. See phase 2 and phase 3.

Jeremy Norman - See ape and Haeckel. Happisburgh - first known settlement in northern Europe , to , years ago a prominent warm stage in Britain. Boyn Gravels feet contain Chellean and Acheulean tools. Taplow Gravels 50 feet contain Mousterian tools. Called third interglacial if dating backwards, but H.

Wells calls the "first interglacial period" Chellean Abbevillian culture in France. The fossil locality of Chilhac three is known for a rich Villafranchian fauna Boeuf It would be another , years before a hippopotamus were to waddle into Britain again. A Encyclopedia says that the Piltdown remains "are usually attributed to the third inter-glacial period, but may be considerably older " The section from table 28 of The Earliest Englishman shows Piltdown Man as the earliest "species of man in western Europe".

The "earliest Englishman" was a fraud. Swanscombe woman is genuine. The geology of Piltdown, in the Weald of East Sussex: The area is one of "Tunbridge Wells Sand" from the cretaceous period. However, in places, there are shallow surface deposits of gravel. These deposits were not shown on the geological maps until after the first world war.

Workman repairing roads excavated them, however, and are said to have provided Charles Dawson with his first scull fragment in The strata at Piltdown. A few centimters to a meter 3. Edmunds mapped the Piltdown gravel in He found it correlated with the Thames Taplow gravels, much younger than the Swanscombe terrace deposits. Leonard Wills' list of recognised "cultural stages" begins with the Lower Paleolithic or river-drift race.

Another source tells us river drift included the Piltdown skull and the Trinil and Heidelberg remains. It was related to the Strepean, Chellean and Acheulean ages. River man was followed by Middle Paleolithic or older cave man - Upper Paleolithic or newer cave man - and then Post-Glacial man.

The scraper on the cover was one of 32 worked flints found in "a clearly datable stratigraphic context" in the "Cromer Forest-bed Formation" at Pakefield, Suffolk, in Britain.

The Somme valley in northern France is developed on an Upper Cretaceous Chalk bedrock continuous with that under the Thames and has has terrace system in its middle part about 70 km long. Between Amiens and Abbeville, ten stepped alluvial formations nappes alluviales have been described.

In the area of Amiens, the river terraces tiered system of Somme includes ten fossil alluvial the oldest the highest was set up there more than a million years.

These deposits are generally decalcified, with little wildlife, except at Abbeville. See also his thesis: Les terrasses quaternaires du bassin de la somme. On the basis of terrace stratigraphy, ESR-quartz dating, and biostratigraphic data, these fluvial deposits are allocated to MIS Handaxes discovered at the base of the slope deposits, directly overlying the fluvial sequence, can be, as a first hypothesis, allocated to MIS They are thus due to Homo heidelbergensis according to the age of the eponymous Mauer site in Germany.

Dating the earliest human occupation of Western Europe: New evidence from the fluvial terrace system of the Somme basin Northern France by Pierre Antoine , Emmanuelle Stoetzel and others Neanderthal developed in Europe and homo erectus in Africa. The picture shows a racial depiction of the separation in a s Children's Encyclopedia. The separation of "ape men" from "true men" is shown as equivalent to, or greater than, that separating humans from gorillas and chimpanzees.

True men then divide into two distinct lines - black negro - negroid - australoid and white european - mongoloid. This distinction is shown as equivalent to that between orang-utangs and gorillas. A group of individuals that actually or potentially interbreed in nature is considered the same species, however different appearances.

See early human gene exchange. About , to , years ago Wooden spears made of spruce of from an ancient lakeshore hunting ground. MIS 10 about , years ago Bilzingsleben site in Germany. In the s Dietrich Mania excavated "three round ground plans of dwellings with hearths by their entrances". He "found large stones arranged in a circular manner. He thought that it probably was a base for a dwelling. However, ring-center analysis showed that the site was an open air site.

Gamble proposed that humans congregated at the site around the fire ". Stone chopping tools of small size, mainly flint. Numerous bone tools include hoes, scrapers , point and gougers.

Some hoes made of antler or ivory. Some wooden artefacts preserved. In , Ireland celebrated four extinct residents: The stamps and the animals are discussed on paleophilatelie. Megaloceros , the Irish elk, represents the Quaternay in the Sydenham display. But the Mousterian hunters had Technology moved its emphasis from fashioning cores to fashioning flakes. At the peak, Northern Hemisphere winters were generally warmer and wetter than now.

The hippopotamus was distributed as far north as the rivers Rhine and Thames. Wikipedia - and further north: Bones from a hippopotamus, and some from rhinoceros and elephant , were dug up in Derby in They are now in the Derybshire Museum's new nature gallery. A large number of sites in Britain are attributed to Marine Isotope Stage 5e, mainly on the basis of hippopotumus remains. None show signs of humans. Natural History Museum Harry William Whanslaw's picture shows "river-drift men" hunting the "straight-tusked elephant of prehistoric time".

An attempt to depict migrations from Madison Coonan's website. From the Near East, these populations spread east to South Asia by 50, years ago , and on to Australia by 40, years ago , when for the first time H. The bones were visually reassembled as a skeleton , which gave the basis for an artist's impression. See polished stone axe There seems to be more ideology than science in the distinction between "homo sapiens" and "homo neanderthalensis".

Arguably first presence of Homo sapiens in Europe. The site consists of two rock shelters. It has given its name to the Mousterian tool culture. Dated remains in Italy and Britain. Wikipedia article on dog. Dog like skull 36, years ago , remains near humans 17, to 16, years ago. Wolf or dog drawing 19, years ago. Neanderthal 1 Femme de la race de Neanderthal. He has dated art in this group to 40, years ago leading to it being described as the world's oldest cave art - See Matthew MacEgan - Nature - National Geographic - BBC dating the region -.

Art News The photograph is from the website of fahrrad-tour. It shows The figure of the lion human, an ivory carving from the tusk of a mammoth displayed in the Museum of Ulm. The same page shows caves where figures have been discovered. About 35, years ago , Carleton S Coon begins his "second phase of history" "the skilled hunter and healer", when "man covers the face of the earth". Ending "about BC with the invention of agricuture". See 50,BC and phase 3.

Rutot called the new race Paleolithic and argued that it enslaved the Neandethals. About 30, years ago , modern homo sapiens entirely replaced earlier man-like forms. Weapons and tools of flint and bone survive along with female carved stone figures with exaggerated sexual features, suggesting fertility symbols and magical ceremonies.

This last level immediately succeeds the latest Mousterian horizon in the cave. Toolmaking culture most closely associated with Venus figurines. The blade is 5. It was found in a Gravettian strata at Brassempouy Right: Four views of one burin , 5.

A Pictorial Encyclopedia mentions cave painting and tools and says: Peking - Piltdown - Neanderthal - Cromagnon. Head carved from mammoth ivory showing a person with an asymmetrical face, found in Dolni Vestonice, Southern Moravia. It is a face: Everything points to the Ice Age hunter having depicted himself". Also known as the Venus of Brassempouy. Acquisition number MAN 47 The Venus of Willendorf was found in Austria in It is thought to be a carving of a woman, without facial features, fat , with pendulous breasts and a huge, perhaps pregnant, belly.

Fragment of engraved reindeer metatarsal decorated on one surface with two reindeer, one of which is now incomplete. Stored in the British Museum where the acquisition notes say "exacavated by both Christy and Lartet in ". Dieu cornu horned god or Sorcier sorcerer or chaman shaman. In animal skins and stag antlers. Upper wall above the entrance to the 20,, year-old grand gallery.

Petit Sorcier a l'Arc Musical Little sorcerer with musical bow , amongst animals in cm wide panel on right hand wall of Sanctuary.

In this picture, the little sorcerer is rotated from vertical to horizontal to show it as a person disguised in animal skins stalking prey. See discussion by Simona Petru, Documenta Praehistorica 39 , "Man, animal or both - Problems in the interpretation of early symbolic behaviour". On "the highest mountains" "shells, skeletons of fish and sea monsters" have been found, showing the sea once covered them.

Animals are found "far from their native areas": Coder and Howe's The Bible, Science and Creation , page 63 says "flood geology" dates creation to about 10, years ago "and relates most of the geological strata and fossil beds to the Flood". In Arabic, a tell is a tall hill. In Midle East Archaeology, a tell is a mound formed by the accumulated remains of ancient settlements.

Mesolithic tools from Britain. Scene of hunting of deer with bows and arrows. This included "eight distinct ages comparable to the Paleolithic and Mesolithic. Sometimes classical antiquity is used for the period of ancient Greece and Rome.

Christian antiquity refers to the early centuries of the Christian church. Foundations of 25 buildings discovered in peat wetland by Robert Rudolf Schmidt in About 20 two-room houses with walls of split wooden posts. A much larger central building probably used for community acrivities. Other buildings possibly for storage.

A hunting community with wheat and barley fields and livestock. Small polished stone hatchets and bone tools found. Hearths and clay ovens in the houses. Britannica "In prehistoric Europe the largest neolithic village yet known, Barkaer in Jutland, comprised 52 small, one-roomed dwellings, but 16 to 30 houses was a more normal figure; so the average local group in neolithic times would average to members". Contains pictographs of heads, feet, hands, numbers and threshing-boards.

Now in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Reign of Narmer in Egypt. The Narmer Palette left was discovered by James E. Quibell in in Hierakonpolis. On it, Narmer displaying the insignia of both Upper and Lower Egypt, giving rise to the theory that he unified the two kingdoms and was the founder of the first dynasty. Narmer is sometimes identified with Menes.

Papyrus, depicted on the Narmer Palette , is a plant that grew in the river Nile from which a writing material, also called papyrus, was made. A setlement from this period lay under the Ur flood deposit disovered by the archaeologist Leonard Woolley and announced in In Wooley believed the 3.

Jona Lendering writes "It is likely Eridu is south of the later city of Ur. This are "was the birthplace of cities and of civilisation about 5, years ago and home to the Sumerians and the later Babylonians ". Stuart Campbell, Manchester archeologist. The first pyramid of Egypt. Said to have been designed by Imhotep, who may be the first architect whose name we know, and who was defied 2. The picture is taken from the Wikipedia website. Clicking on it will take you to more information.

Noah took off the covering of the ark". Usher refering to Genesis 8: See "evidences of the Deluge" and flood geology.

See Epic of Gilgamesh and Ur flood. Picture described as "Various animals entering the Ark built by Noah because of the great flood". Excavation of Tell Khaiber, 20 kilometres from Ur about BC "We provisionally date the site to around 2, BC, the time of the sack of the city and the fall of the last Sumerian royal dynasty.

Metres above sea-level of lowest images from succeding periods ordered by type of ship: Period four to five: Scandinavian boat drawings have been interpreted as skin boats, planked boats, dugouts and rafts.

All images with inturned prows and horizontal or slightly upturned keel extensions were 24 metes or more above sea level. Baal meant lord, master, owner or husband in Semitic languages. It was also applied to Gods. The plural was Baalim. Baalim might own specific areas, being the Gods of specific peoples.

The Jews also called God lord and believed he had a special relationship to them. However, they eventually believed in only one God monotheism who is master of all, and they believed that graven images should not be made of him. Vase painting BC in British Museum shows 4 oarsman, but 6 oars. Suggested there were 12 men, 6 oars each side, 3 men to a bench.

The Ramesseum in Thebes is the 'mortuary temple' of this Egyptian king. The Petrie Papyri were found beneath this. In periods four and five more elaborate "depictions of humans" Ling, page A large increase in the use of iron for tools and weapons took place from the neo-Assyrian period onwards. Jericho was in Israel. Around BC , Hiel is said to have rebuilt the walls. Braman was a tanner and currier by trade. At his death, which occurred in the 90's, the property was left to his heirs.

Flora Braman Moison is now living on the place. Adjoining on the east is the Carlton Lakey home, son of Thomas Lakey, one of Palmyra's earliest settlers. Carlton died in the 80's. His widow, after living here several years, sold the place to Harry Yerkes and moved away in The two little houses on the east are old land marks. In , William Pierce owned 22 the west one, now owned by James Trotter. The one on the east is owned by Olin Van Cise.

The next little brick house on the east was built in the early 50's by Pliny Hibberd. Hibberd was a carpenter by trade. At his death which occurred in the 80's the little house and four acres of land came to his son Thomas, who was a veteran of the Civil War. After his death the village purchased the property, using the house for a home for the village policeman, Mr.

Johnson being the first village policeman to occupy it in After a few years the village sold the house and frontage to Paul Goodnow. Crossing the cen1etery driveway our first house is where a Mr. Strong lived in the 60's, later sold to Colporteur Durfee of Marion. After his death the late Augustus Jeffrey bought the place.

His son Charles and daughter Edna now live on the place. The John Parshall place comes next where his sisters lived. Now it is owned by Peter Molner, a native of Holland. The late Patrick McGreal lived in the next house. He died about and the place went into the hands of John R. Now it is owned and occupied by Emil DeBuyser. They were built about In the 50's Anson Boyingtonl bought the little seven-acre farm on the east.

After living here a short time he died and the place was sold to Mr. Talcott, who came here in the early 50's and was engaged in raising tobacco for several years on Maple Avenue. After being in the business several years he sold the place on Vienna Street to a Mr. Walker and went back to Massachusetts. In the 60's the late William Rushmore, who sold his large farm in Farmington, came to Palmyra, and purchased this place.

At his death, which occurred about , the property was again sold and William Perry became the owner, a stock dealer. Now he is living on the place. In the late 50's Stephen Jerdon, the auctioneer, purchased the home and lot on the east. Since his death, which occurred in the 70's, there has been several different owners. Now it is owned and occupied by Jacob Dayton. Next to the Dayton house on the east has been built a new house owned and occupied by James Webster.

We now come to Howell Street, named after a Mr. Howell, one of the earliest settlers, who owned a farm west of here in an early day, and laid out this street. I have been unable to get the exact bounds of this farm, only his west line was the east line of General John Swift's acres, whose west line was the west line of the Eagle Hotel. Howell, in laying out Howell Street, kept a narrow strip on the east side of the street that could be sold off in village lots, of which William Beck bought six acres, and built a house and barn on the corner of Vienna and Howell Streets.

On the opposite corner on the west stands a house built by the late William Foskett. Now it is owned by William Durkin. Passing along on Howell Street our first house after leaving the corner on the west is a house built by William S. Our next on the south is a house built by the late George Wheeler in the 50's.

Wheeler was 23 one of the earliest sextons at the Palmyra cemetery. He succeeded Henry Addicott. This office he held with honor until old age compelled him to retire. He died in the 70's. Our next house was built by the late Charles Wright, who was for many years a wagon maker with his shop on east Canal Street.

Wright were brothers-in-law, each married a daughter of the late John Brown. The Wheeler place, now is owned by William B. Clinton, while the Wright place is owned by Lewis Carroll. Adjoining on the south is the home of Harriet Clinton, widow of the late Joseph Clinton.

The Clinton place is now occupied by Harlow Veeder, a son-in-law of Mrs. Passing the Catholic cemetery we come to a small farm owned and occupied by Daniel Vanderwege, bounded on the south by his son-in-Iaw's place, John Elias.

Across the way on the east side, is the Hornsby homestead, now occupied by Fred Hornsby and sister Millie Hornsby. Next on the south, down a lane, is the well-kept home of James Noonan. Just east of the Beck place in early days stood an old land mark and for several years was occupied by the Porter family. Later it was moved to the south end of Gates Street on the west side. It was owned at one time by Elmer Jones, followed by William Parker, a native of Walworth, and a veteran of the Civil War, and it is now owned and occupied by William Plummer.

Next on the east is a new house owned and occupied by Harry Beach, followed by a new house owned and occupied by Rev. Frank Cook, a retired minister.

The large brick house that stands back from the road was built in the 30's by Mr. Rossman, who sold the house and farm to Samuel Horton in the 40's.

Since then it has changed owners several times. Now it is owned and occupied by Henry Mason, whose son, Henry, has the distinction of building the first airplane made in this town. Its first successful flight was made on August 19, All this airplane he made himself, except the motor which is a rebuilt motorcycle engine.

At one time this was a large farm. Now, 20 acres are in the corporation. Jesse Westfall built the house on the little acre farm on the east, which he sold to Mrs. At his death it became by purchase, the property of the late Thomas Cornwell, later by Mr. Klink, and now by James Fries. From the east line of this farm to the mill pond was a tract of land extending south, containing about 30 acres, owned in the 50's by the late Ira Hadsell. We now come to the mill pond. Let us now return to Throop Street, passing the Addicott house.

As we go east our first house is the M. Adjoining this on the east is owned by the heirs of the late Owen Burns, who came to Palmyra 24 with his brother from Pennsylvania and bought the Addicott cooper shop on Throop Street. Burns was a cooper by trade. In this shop he carried on an extensive business and employed a good many men making apple barrels and delivering them through the country.

This once thriving business has somewhat changed, the business began to wane. Burns became old, the barrel factory was closed, the old shop was torn down and a dwelling house stands on the site and the name of Burns Cooper Shop has passed into history. Our next house on the east, away back in the early 50's, was the old "Black Bett" house, later the home of Frank Barks, followed by Clark and Bert Storms.

In the 60's the late Alfred Sansbury bought the lot on the east, moved the present little house on this lot which he sold in to Miss Amanda Bradley. This little story she used to tell about Judge S. Nelson Sawyer, who lived neighbor to her when a boy. Back of their house in the bed of the old Erie Canal was a pond of water, where in the winter the boys used to slide and skate.

His father had given him strict orders to keep away from the pond on the promise of giving a good whipping if found out, but one day the temptation was too great and in an unguarded moment he went down to the pond and stepped on the ice which broke through, getting both feet soaking wet. He went into Miss Bradley's where was always his refuge when in trouble.

Here he stayed until both stockings were dry, not forgetting to tell Miss Bradley not to reveal this act of disobedience to his father. This old lady died in , being over 94 years old and the place is now owned and occupied by Abraham Johnson, who lives there alone. The three houses on the east, for a good many years, were owned by the late William Foskett, who followed boating all his life.

The west house was occupied for a good many years by his brother, Augustus. The Foskett family have all passed away. William died in the 80's. Augustus was a tailor and died about After the death of William, John Hennessey purchased the middle house.

The daughter of William Foskett now lives in the east house and James Fox owns the west one. In the 50's the late Isaac Tabor purchased the lot, built the little brick house on the east.

Tabor was a carpenter by trade and a son of Silas Tabor. Isaac was employed a good many years at the Bulmer lumber yard. His widow continued to occupy the place for several years. At her death the place passed into the hands of Alice Gifford. It is now owned and occupied by William Ray. Clinton Tyler now owns the house on the east. In the vacant lot on the east in early days a house was built and occupied by the late Benjamin Hibberd.

After many years the old landmark was torn down. On this same site Mr. He also built the Tyler house which is followed by a new house which is owned and occupied by Mrs. Ida Webb; also followed by a new cottage occupied by Mrs. When Tyler's house was first built, his son Ezra, who was a tinsmith by. When he moved to Phelps where he died in the 70's, his brother Charles occupied the house west of the large one.

Elizabeth Loudell, mother-in-law of Benjamin Hibberd, owned a large tract of land extending from the line of the large house west, taking several lots; also all the land included in the old part of the old cemetery. Gertrude Johnson, whose husband was a war veteran, lives on the east, while the house to the west of the large Hibberd house is occupied by Glenn Cunningham.

We now come to the old Graham place. Graham was a native of England, coming to this country in the 40's. He was a carpenter by trade. After the death of Mr. Graham, which occurred many years ago, the property remained in the hands of the heirs until about , when it was sold after being made over into a double house. It is now owned by Abram Johnson.

Our next house is the old William Sampson house. Sampson was uncle to the late Admiral William T. It is now owned by Mrs. Alice Walker Middleton Button. About James Middleton built a house on this lot and on the east side. His widow, who subsequently married Stanley Button, still owns the place. Then comes Michael Gorman's house, now owned by Richard Dunn. Adjoining on the east is the new house built on the Walker lot by William. His father, Lemuel Walker, lived on the east.

On the east is the house that Hiram O. Young built about The house on the east was built by the late William Jones, who was our street commissioner for several years. He was killed instantly by accident. The place is now owned by Daniel McGuire.

We now come to Kent Street, which was opened in the 70's, but was never accepted by the village. The house on the northwest corner was built in the 80's by a Mr. McLane and is now owned and occupied by Peter Gilman.

Passing along we come to a typical old New England house, owned in the 60's by a Mr. Earl, a blacksmith by trade. Our next house on the east was once the home of James VanNess, a professional weaver, who came from Columbia County to Palmyra about or VanNess bought a small lot on which he built the small house now owned by Charles Hornsby residing in Lyons.

He built a little shop, close to the walk, in which he commenced weaving carpets, blankets and coverlets, the latter of which 26 he made a specialty in. Their artistic design and skill in workmanship was the admiration of those who saw them.

Many mothers had one woven to give to each daughter. Now they can be found in many states of the Union where they have been carried by the children or grandchildren and are fondly cherished by them as one of the dearest memories of the old homestead.

In he sold out and bought a small farm in the eastern part of the town. In he sold his little farm and moved to Hudson, Mich. About , while fighting a forest fire, he became tired and sat down at the foot of a tree to rest. A burned limb fell, striking him on the head, killing him. The next house on the east was built in the late 50's by William Smith, a native of England. Now it is owned by William Van Conant. Adjoining on the east is a little house, which in the 30's was owned by Silas Drake, called "Uncle Drake.

Drake had a little shop where he did repair work, such as putting in cradle fingers and mending furniture. He also, at one time, had a little mill in the rear where he had a turning lathe. Drake had no children. One morning in the 20's when he arose, and went to the front door, he saw a market basket on the door step, and on inspecting it, he found a little baby boy, wrapped in a blanket. He took it inside and showed the prize to his wife, and, in waiting in vain for some owner to call, he and Kazia made up their minds they would take it as their own, and tenderly care for it and named it Leonard Drake.

After the child had grown to be large enough, he became handy with tools and learned to turn out different things at the lathe in the mill. About he was employed for a time, working at the lathe in Henry Jenner's cabinet shop.

About he was married to Calista Conant. In he moved to Michigan where he died several years later. Drake was one of the earliest settlers on the street, coming here in the 20's. When they became old, Josiah said he generally cut the bread, for he could carry a little steadier hand than Kezia. Drake passed away in , aged 90 years, and his wife died in , aged 80 years. We now come to the Ira Hadsell place, who, in the 20's, came to Palmyra and was also an expert weaver.

In or he worked on the Erie Canal. After the canal was finished, he bought a little acre farm at the south end of the mill pond. Across the road he bought a lot on which he built a little house and barn, and carried on his little farm until the arrival of Mr. Van Ness, when he hired out to work for the latter until he sold out in Hadsell bought his looms and patterns and built a shop on his own lot, and continued in the business, until the patronage began to wane, and rugs and carpets were bought more at the stores.

Then he closed his shop and turned his attention to his farm, and sold milk in the village for a number of years. He died in at the age of 83 years.

Hadsell, his second wife and son moved to California. At the time the Drake house was burned the Hadsell house and shop was also destroyed. Now there stands on each of these lots new and modern houses. The Beach house was built by A. We now come to the old mill property. On September 17, , three brothers, Isaac, Jonah and Gilbert Howell came to Palmyra, and arrived by the northern inland route, and bought a tract of land at the east end of the village, of which some say the western boundary line was just north of the Throop house on Main Street, while others say it was the east line of the George Jessup property.

These brothers brought with them irons and stones for a saw and grist mill. But as the stream was small and furnished water only Spring and Fall, for the grinding of grain, the grist mill was abandoned, but the saw mill was used for nearly a hundred and twenty years. Of the Howells, Jonah was the one who carried on the mills.

After living in a log house for a time, he built a house east of the mill and on the north side of the road, in which he lived. Vienna Street was not yet laid out until In the 70's Valentine Natt bought the property on the east side of the brook and built the ice house on the south side of the road and sold ice in the village.

In the 60's Ezra Chapman came from Massachusetts to Palmyra, bought the mill and the house on the west side of the brook and ran the saw mill several years, and when the logs became scarce and it no longer paid to run the saw mill, it was converted into a cider mill where they also ground sorghum.

Chapman died in the 80's. They carried on the ice business and ran the cider mill for a number of years, until they sold out to Henry R. In Edward Bowe acquired the property and still owns it. Long years have passed sinc. The arm that guided the mallet and chisel to dress the stone that ground the grain is forever stilled. For more than years the old mill stones lay slumbering unconscious of the past, in the back yard on the west side of the mill, when a few years ago the yard was filled in, covering the old mill stones and now no one knows of their habitation.

Let us once more return to Throop Street. Across from the Jessup basin still stands the old Throop tavern. Its first occupant for a short time was a man by the name of McDonald. Then came Benjamin Throop from Maine, a native of England and a sailor, who came to Palmyra just before the Erie Canal went through, bought out McDonald and moved into this tavern with its brick cellar kitchen in front, now looking very much 28 as it did years ago.

He did a thriving business while the canal was being dug. Many a time someone had to sleep on the floor for want of beds. In front, directly opposite the door was a watering trough with a wooden pen stock.

The water came through wooden logs. This faithful old fountain slaked the thirst of many a man and beast. Many a boy and girl on their way to and from the old stone school house, as a token of respect, would take a social draught from this old fountain. When the New York Central went through, this watering place was moved further west to a place called the Diamond, thus giving better accommodations to the public.

These old watering places will soon be forgotten and known only in history. The old red barn and shed that stood in the corner east of the tavern to accommodate the public has long since been torn down and dwelling houses are occupying the site.

In one corner of the old shed could be seen for many years the old cannon, "Young Hickory," mounted on wheels, waiting the return of another Fourth of July. Then the boys would draw her up on Prospect Hill long before daylight, load her up and touch her off, thus notifying everyone in the village that the glorious old Eagle was again on the wing and "Young Hickory" was again to proclaim it, while in the valley below, Erastus Kellogg played upon the fife, and his brother William beat upon the bass drum and Edwin Tyler put the extra touches on the snare drum.

At one time when "Young Hickory" was called upon to make a speech in front of the Exchange Hotel, one man who was full of glory, wishing to introduce "Young Hickory" to the audience, touched her with a lighted cigar, but "Young Hickory" said, "Hands off.

I do my own talking. This old-time custom has long since passed away and no one today can tell whatever became of "Young Hickory. Edwin Tyler died with small pox. The Kellogg family consisted of five boys and three girls. Four of the boys went to war, but one, Milo, the youngest of the family, returned. Erastus, William and James never returned. One of the girls married Eugene Smith, the other married William Gilbert. Both of these were in the army and returned at the close of the war, but with broken health.

Of all these, not one of the Kelloggs are living today and only known as history records them. Gilbert 'died in the 70's and Smith died in the 80's, and of these old musicians, who never returned, friend or stranger, when in the Village Hall can read their names chiseled in the marble tablet with the names of other comrades who laid down their lives for the Stars and Stripes.

On the east corner of Mill and Main Streets stands the old Jessup block. This building once ran to the south. A portion of it was turned around so as to face Main Street. While the tannery was running, it was used for a boarding house and was called the Long House. In the 29 80's the late George Williams purchased this property, made a good many repairs. About William Darling bought the property and now is still the owner.

Many and many are the tenants that have moved in and out of this old building, some for a short time while others stayed longer. The old building looks very much as it did over 80 years ago. As we pass down Mill Street, which was laid out in , resurveyed in , our first house on the east came into the possession of George Williams, whose name has been mentioned before. He was a contractor and builder. In the 70's he remodeled this brick house and lived here until his death which occurred about In the 40's, where this brick house stands and the one south owned by John DeVuyst, was a part of the mill yard for the old Jessup saw mill that stood on the east side of Mill Street, while the pond was on the west side.

The mill yard extended across the brook and around on the north side of Vienna Street as far as the Garlock house, corner of Throop and Vienna Streets. At that time there were no houses here and where all those houses now stand was a mill yard where farmers piled their logs that were drawn in the Winter to be sawed into lumber, each taking his turn on the list.

This street was only a lane, for it was filled with logs and there was barely room to drive through with a wagon. In the 40's Draper Allen ran the mill which was kept going during the Winter and Spring months whenever there was sufficient water. General Swift erected this mill at a very early date, and from this old mill went lumber to build many a house and barn for the earlier inhabitants of the village and town.

The old mill has long since been torn down and no track or trace of it can be found where once it stood. The name of Draper Allen has been forgotten. When Route 20 went through, the old mill pond was used for a dumping ground. Little cottages now dot the old mill yard where the logs were piled up to wait their turn to be sawed.

Speaking of the old mill yard: As late as in the 40's there were no houses from the Long House on the east side of Mill Street and the north side of Vienna until we come to the corner of Throop and Vienna Streets. On this corner in the early 40's stood an old wood-colored house of a fair size, and was evidently the first house made of frame built on this tract, for at the time Mr. Jessup came into possession of this property it had barely been cleared of forest trees. I have been unable to locate Mr.

He would naturally build on his own land and at that time this would be considered a good location. Vienna Street was laid out the year previous to his coming to Palmyra and Throop Street was a main thoroughfare. Taking all this into consideration it would go to show that this was at one time his residence.

In the early 40's a man by the name of Bristol lived here. He was a cooper and had his shop just north of the house. Please do not get this shop mixed with the Burns shop that was further north.

In the late Augustus Soper lived in this house. His son Adelbert was born in this house and spent all his life here in the village. Later the late Morrison Ford bought the property, and lived here until his death which occurred 30 in the 90's.

Ford was street commissioner for several years in the village. After his death Olin J. Garlock purchased the property, enlarged the house and converted it into a fine, large double house and is still the owner. Among the houses that now occupy the old mill yard on Vienna Street: The first house west of the Garlock house is the Thomas Maley house. The house adjoining on the west was built by the late Samuel Sawyer.

Among the different owners were Spencer Stephens, a Civil War veteran, at one time in the clothing business on Market Street; later a man by the name of Herendeen.

Now, and for several years previous, it has been owned and occupied by Judson Garlock. In the 40's the late Isaac Besley built the little one-story cottage on the west.

After his death the little place passed into the hands of John K. Later Charles Lebrecht became its owner. He built a small house on the east side of the lot and sold it to Charles Brownell who is living there. The original Besley house is owned by Mrs.

The house on the west was once owned by Pliny Sexton. Among the different owners were Albert Tremper and it is now owned by Edward Farrell. In passing I would say Mr. Besley was once a business man in our town in the 40's. He had a grocery store on the dock; later a store in the Sanford block. The little house on the corner west was built in the 70's by the late Richard Pritchard. Among the different owners were Mrs.

Now a gas station adjoins the house which is owned by William Orlopp. Later it was owned by the late Charles Johnson. It is now owned by the heirs of the late Lillian Garlock. It also extended from the south side of Main Street on the north to the south side of the mill pond on the south. On the west lot Mr. Foster erected a fine, large, two-story house, where he lived until his death, which occurred in the 70's.

Foster came to Palmyra in early life. After his death the property passed into the hands of James Smith. In the 80's Delos Cummings purchased the property, enlarged the house, put on a third story and opened it up as a hotel and it was called the Cummings House.

This did not prove to be a paying investment. After a few years it was sold to Olin J. Garlock converted the building into an apartment house and heated it with steam coming from the factory that was just south of the office.

After keping this property several years he sold it. Since then it has had several owners. Our next house on the east was the Tuttle house. Tuttle was a tanner by trade and was for several years in the tanning business in company with Henry Jessup.

In the 60's the old tannery was burned and the business was closed out, and Mr. Coates acquired the property and after living here several years sold the little old house to George B.

Parker, who had a shoe store in the Jarvis 31 block. He named his store "The Now it is owned by George McKnutt. It is located on the north side of the brook.

Coates built a fine house on the site of the old one. About , he sold this place to F. Jackman, who had a laundry on Williams Street. About , George Heath, a native of Palmyra, who, when a young man, went to New York and after a while, wishing to retire somewhat from business, came back to his home town, bought out Mrs.

Louisa Smith, who at that time owned the property, and lived in a house adjoining on the east, and east of this is an old land mark, but it has been greatly changed from 85 years ago, wh. She was a great friend to the children and a dear woman. Her husband was a saddler by trade and died in the 40's. Two of her daughters were missionaries in a foreign land for a great many years. After the death of Mrs. West the place changed hands several times.

In the 90's the late George Barnhart bought the place from George French and remodeled the house. Barnhart was killed several years ago in an automobile accident.

His widow, in , married William Spier and is still living on the same place. Our next on the east in the 70's was owned and occupied by James Hersey, who was a mechanic of more than common ability. Hersey sold to George French and moved East where he died.

French, for a great many years, was manager of the gas works. Now the place is owned and occupied by Frederick Smith. This house was moved here from Catherine Street.

His neighbor on the east was Mr. Millard, a millwright by trade. In the 50's he bought the lot and built the house. After his death the late John Brick bought the property and lived here several years. After his death, which occurred in , the place was sold to George Throop.

Adjoining on the east was the home of Aschel Hildreth, who moved from Canal Street in the 50's and built this brick house. Hildreth, as well as his neighbor on the west, was a mill wright.

He had one daughter, who married a man by the name of Howe. This position she held a good many years, and no doubt she is remembered by a good many of her scholars today. At one time the late Joseph Rogers owned the place and lived there. In William J. Eibler bought the place of Mrs.

Martha Elliott and covered the outside with stucco. It is now owned and occupied by Isaac Van Overbake. We will pass on to the corner of Mill and Main Streets. Up to there stood here an old landmark. There are but few living in town today that know that next to the first school house in town stood on this corner. This was called the Democratic school house. After the three school districts came into being, which was in , Mr. Henry Jessup bought the old school house, and made it into a tenant house.

Los Angeles, California Assumed Aliases: It wasn't until the dawn of the 80's that Dorothy LeMay really hit her carnal stride. But once Dorothy LeMay found her erotic niche, she became one of the all-time fan favorites. Dorothy LeMay was a busty little vixen with a curvaceous, scrumptious figure and a pretty, wide-jawed face that seemed to exude sexual longing.

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Dorothy LeMay performed in sex flicks from the late '70s to the early '80s. The right kind of people making the right movie, the right money, and a good script. People have to treat me well and I don't do loops anymore. Whereas a loop has hardly any story line and it's mostly silly if there is one.

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It didn't make sense. That experience almost made me get out of the business. Also the filmmakers worked me 18 hours a day for three day. It turned my head around. He paid me twice as much as I was paid for the other film and he was nice to me. That was the first time I worked with John Leslie. We did a hot, hot sauna scene.

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But we got paid anyway. And we'd [a group of porn stars recruited for a nude scene in 10] get crazy in our Culver City hotel room. Annette Haven had her leather party one night and room service walked into it. Jamie Gillis and Serena were there.

about ,, years ago early seaweed formed.. Molecular clock methods indicate that red and green algae arose around 1,,, years ago, and the secondary symbiosis that eventually led to the chromists occurred around 1,,, years ago during the late Mesoproterzoic era, after the earth's transition to a more highly oxygenated atmosphere with an ozone screen. Dorothy LeMay Biography from official movie clips club. Dorothy LeMay biography, interview, movie clips and photos. Her personal life and movie careeir. Box . 5 P A L M Y R A. In the winter of John Swift and Colonel John Jenkins purchased Tract 12, Range 2, now Palmyra, and commenced the survey of it into farm lots in March.