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Section Navigation Section Navigation. It is defined as "the taking, fishing for, or possession of finfish, shellfish, or other fishery resources, by Alaska residents for personal use and not for sale or barter, with gill or dip net, seine, fish wheel, long line, or other means defined by the Board of Fisheries".

The Board of Fisheries established personal use fisheries to allow Alaskan residents to harvest fish for food in areas that are not eligible for subsistence fisheries. Personal use fisheries are only allowed when they won't jeopardize sustained yield of the resource, and won't negatively impact an existing resource use, and are in the broad public interest.

It is unlawful to buy, sell, trade or barter personal use finfish, shellfish, aquatic plants, or their parts. Participation includes, but is not limited to, handling the gear, handling the fish, or driving the boat. For fishing and hunting purposes, the Alaska State Legislature has defined a resident as "a person who is physically present in Alaska with the intent to remain indefinitely and makes a home here, has maintained that person's domicile in Alaska for 12 consecutive months immediately preceding an application for a license and not claiming residency or obtaining benefits under a claim of residency in another state, territory, or country.

Alaska resident youth under 18 do not have to purchase a sport fishing license to participate. However, they must meet the residency requirement. A permit is required to participate in the Chitina Subdistrict Personal Use dip net fishery. Chitina permits are available online.

Chitina Personal Use permits are household permits. This means that only one permit will be issued per household. See the Permits and Regulations page for more information on where you can get a permit, requirements of the permit and information on filling out your permit harvest card. Households must choose one or the other permit.

Households that are found to have received both the Chitina personal use permit and the Glennallen subsistence permit may be subject to fines and loss of future personal use fishing privileges. Limits are per household. A head of household is allowed 25 salmon, and for each additional household member the household is allowed 10 more salmon. As a portion of these limits, the annual limit for Chinook king salmon is one per household.

Supplemental harvest periods are no longer scheduled. By regulation, you must "mark" salmon harvested in a personal use fishery in which a permit is required by clipping both tips of the tail fin. Many people use strong kitchen shears to cut off both tips of the tail fin.

Because it is unlawful to buy, sell, trade or barter personal use fish or their parts, a person may not possess personal use salmon that was taken under the authority of a permit unless both tips of the tail fin have been removed from the salmon.

The salmon must be marked before the salmon is concealed from plain view, such as put in a cooler, or before the salmon is transported from the fishing site, such as your vehicle. Failure to mark the salmon is a violation, and may be subject to fines and loss of future personal use fishing privileges. The following graphs may help you plan on "When to Go" to Chitina.

Each graph shows average salmon harvest by species, by day for a recent five year interval. Keep in mind that these are average harvests for the five years indicated and do not necessarily reflect what will occur this season.

Due to poor run strength, king salmon retention was prohibited after mid-late June in the Chitina Subdistrict from Fish counts are conducted from about mid-May to the end of July using a sonar site at the outlet of Miles Lake about 70 miles from the Chitina dip net fishery area.

Prior to mid-July, it takes approximately 2 weeks, depending on river conditions, for salmon to travel from Miles Lake to the Chitina dip net fishery area approximately 70 miles. After mid-July it takes about 3 weeks. You do not need a king salmon stamp for personal use. You do need a king salmon stamp if you will be sport fishing for king salmon. Steelhead and rainbow trout may not be kept while dipnetting at Chitina. You are required to return these fish to the river.

The Chitina dip net permit is for salmon only. Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Questions What is "Personal Use"? What is a dip net? I have relatives coming to visit; can they help me dipnet? Do I need a sport fishing license to dipnet in the Chitina Subdistrict? Do I need a permit to dipnet in the Chitina Subdistrict? Can my household have both a Chitina dip net permit and a Glennallen subsistence permit? What is the bag limit for salmon in the Chitina Subdistrict?

When is the Chitina Subdistrict open to dipnetting? I heard I have to "mark" salmon caught in a personal use fishery such as the Chitina Subdistrict.

How do I do this? When is the best time to go dipnetting in the Chitina Subdistrict? How many salmon are in the river right now? How long does it take for salmon to travel from the Miles Lake Sonar to the Chitina dip net fishery area?

Can the fish be used as bait? Do I need a king salmon stamp to harvest a king salmon under the personal use permit? Can I keep a rainbow trout while dipnetting in the Chitina Subdistrict? What is "Personal Use"? The only gear you may use in the Chitina Subdistrict is a dip net. In 5 AAC Chitina Subdistrict Dip Net Fishery: Select image to enlarge.

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This means that only one permit will be issued per household. See the Permits and Regulations page for more information on where you can get a permit, requirements of the permit and information on filling out your permit harvest card. Households must choose one or the other permit. Households that are found to have received both the Chitina personal use permit and the Glennallen subsistence permit may be subject to fines and loss of future personal use fishing privileges.

Limits are per household. A head of household is allowed 25 salmon, and for each additional household member the household is allowed 10 more salmon. As a portion of these limits, the annual limit for Chinook king salmon is one per household. Supplemental harvest periods are no longer scheduled. By regulation, you must "mark" salmon harvested in a personal use fishery in which a permit is required by clipping both tips of the tail fin.

Many people use strong kitchen shears to cut off both tips of the tail fin. Because it is unlawful to buy, sell, trade or barter personal use fish or their parts, a person may not possess personal use salmon that was taken under the authority of a permit unless both tips of the tail fin have been removed from the salmon. The salmon must be marked before the salmon is concealed from plain view, such as put in a cooler, or before the salmon is transported from the fishing site, such as your vehicle.

Failure to mark the salmon is a violation, and may be subject to fines and loss of future personal use fishing privileges. The following graphs may help you plan on "When to Go" to Chitina.

Each graph shows average salmon harvest by species, by day for a recent five year interval. Keep in mind that these are average harvests for the five years indicated and do not necessarily reflect what will occur this season. Due to poor run strength, king salmon retention was prohibited after mid-late June in the Chitina Subdistrict from Fish counts are conducted from about mid-May to the end of July using a sonar site at the outlet of Miles Lake about 70 miles from the Chitina dip net fishery area.

Prior to mid-July, it takes approximately 2 weeks, depending on river conditions, for salmon to travel from Miles Lake to the Chitina dip net fishery area approximately 70 miles. After mid-July it takes about 3 weeks. You do not need a king salmon stamp for personal use. You do need a king salmon stamp if you will be sport fishing for king salmon.

Steelhead and rainbow trout may not be kept while dipnetting at Chitina. You are required to return these fish to the river. The Chitina dip net permit is for salmon only. Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Questions What is "Personal Use"? What is a dip net? I have relatives coming to visit; can they help me dipnet? Fairbanks Native Association has named its main office building the Poldine Carlo Building in her honor.

She is beloved throughout the region. Born in Fairbanks, Alaska to an Athabaskan mother and Scandinavian- heritage father, Jeanmarie Crumb has served Alaska in the arenas of education, health, and politics. She attended Fairbanks public schools, and went on to graduate from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Harvard Graduate School of Education, and holds a doctorate in Educational Administration from the University of Southern California.

In that position she oversaw several programs serving the needs of parents and students from the many cultural groups in the city. Other achievements with lasting effect included working with students whose families were eligible for Migrant Education services. After— school tutoring and summer Outdoor Education camps were positive influences on the lives of children.

In the arena of community service, Crumb ran for public office in , as the Green Party candidate for Lt. Between and , she was privileged to attend the Barbara Brennan School of Healing and is a certified energy healer. Jeanmarie Larson Crumb was born on the summer solstice, June 21, at St.

Her mother could hear the cheering from the crowd watching the traditional midnight sun baseball game. The new baby was born at the end of the Second World War, at a time that the United States and her allies emerged victorious. At the time of her graduation from high school in , the direction that the country and the world seemed to be headed was encouragingly positive. The optimistic outlook became a permanent part of her character. Her mother Alice read to her from an early age and helped her to learn the alphabet before starting school.

Thus began a lifelong love of books. In grade three the entire collection of books was exchanged with the other third grade class at the Christmas holiday. Jeanmarie remembers reading all of the books from both collections. Strict and demanding old fashioned teachers with lace up shoes with clunky heels were the norm at Main school in Fairbanks. In fifth grade Miss Wilson required recitation of lengthy poems in front of the class. Although Fairbanks was a small isolated town in the far north, the education system was exceptional.

Her father fostered in her the expectation that she would attend college. Beginning with grade 7, he had her accompany him to the bank every two weeks when he received his paycheck. The resulting accumulation of funds paid for tuition and books when she attended the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Participation in cultural activities and in her Native corporation, Doyon, Ltd. Throughout her lifetime she was privileged to receive information, cooperation, and inspiration from many individuals.

She acknowledges that her success was dependent upon their encouragement and support. First and foremost she would like to express gratitude to her parents, Albert E. Larson and Alice E. Her father worked as an engineer on the steamer Nenana for 18 years. Her mother was at one time the youngest postmaster in Alaska. She also says that D.

Edna Lamebull was unfailingly supportive during their years together at the Anchorage School District. Patty Dolese shared the day to day management of the Migrant Education Summer Camps and became a permanent friend. He authorized her to be able to finish her coursework in Alaska after she discovered that she was severely allergic to the Los Angeles smog. Other friends who played vital roles are Kristine Block and Dee Gould.

She politely declined, as she had decided to resume her career in Alaska. Early in her career she had decided to focus her efforts on serving Alaska Native people. BeIng In the right place at the right time meant that the organization went through a period of rapid growth as the new law enabled Native American non profits to begin to take over management of programs formerly managed by the federal government.

While at Cook Inlet Native Association she initiated regional health programs that became the model for the rest of the state. She has been a role model for other women who aspire to careers in public service, public health and education.

Since a second retirement in Jeanmarie has enjoyed traveling and spends a few months in the winter in an RV community in Arizona.

Frederica de Laguna was a pioneer in anthropology whose contributions to understanding indigenous peoples stand as the definitive work for many Alaskan cultures. Her three-volume tome, Under Mount Saint Elias remains the definitive description of the Yakutat Tlingit who honored her with a clan name.

After graduating with honors from Bryn Mawr College in politics and economics, de Laguna took her Ph. In , fieldwork in Greenland with the great Danish anthropologist, Therkel Mathiesen, launched her lifetime fascination with the Arctic. A carved stone bowl with a human figure enticed de Laguns to travel to Cook Inlet where she conducted archaeological fieldwork — Describing, defining and naming the Kachemak Culture Kachemak tradition , resulted in her first book, The Archaeology of Cook Inlet, Alaska, which remains the definitive description of the Kachemak people.

She was a gifted writer and photographer as evidenced in many professional papers and books published Her writings focused on archaeology and then ethnography when understanding the lives of living Natives became her passion. As a woman, de Laguna interviewed Native women, a privilege usually not available to male anthropologists. At Bryn Mawr, de Laguna founded and chaired the anthropology department, teaching for 40 years, mentoring and inspiring others, especially young women. She demonstrated that women could be scholars and leaders in the male-dominated field of anthropology.

In a career full of honors and awards, receiving the life-long achievement award in from the Alaska Anthropology Association was especially gratifying.

Her formative years were spent in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, where her doting, devoted father provided her education at home until age nine. During his visits to Japan and the Philippines, he had become intrigued with linguistics and translated and wrote songs in a dialect of the Pilipino language. Freddy thrived on his stories.

Reading and critical thinking were elemental in the family. Adventure and travel stories were favorites and Freddy immersed herself in the literature of the North, especially inspired by narratives of famous European explorers such as Knud Rasmussen, Peter Freuchen, Therkel Mathiassen, and Kai Birket-Smith. Freddy occasionally acted upon what she read.

Catharine McClellan, a student and later collaborator with Freddy during her Alaskan studies, wrote that Freddy sent Commander Donald MacMillian, who made over 30 expeditions to the Arctic, a letter in which she offered to chew his boots if he would take her on his next expedition. Not only did books transport her to tantalizing lands of adventure, but, possibly, they provided solace during the many illnesses that plagued her childhood. In this family of educators one can almost imagine the stimulating conversations, probing questions, and challenging responses between Theodore, Grace, and resident and visiting philosophers; and, on the sideline, young Freddy listening, learning, and developing critical and analytical thinking skills.

These abilities provided a solid foundation for her future and the academic career that awaited her. Freddy entered Bryn Mawr College in , planning to major in economics and psychology, yet health problems caused her to drop the psychology major and, she discovered, economics was not compelling.

She struggled to find a career that combined her love of the outdoors, of adventure, of foreign cultures, and of travel with sufficient mental challenges and excitement. In Freddy graduated summa cum laude from BMC yet a career eluded her. They had heard Franz Boas lecture about anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania and thought that Freddy, too, might find him stimulating. She did and entered Columbia University in to study under him. At that time, Boas was one of the foremost influential anthropologists in America.

Slowly Freddy moved toward anthropology and, that same year, after activating the European Fellowship, joined the American School of Prehistoric Research field party, traveling widely and meeting leading anthropologists on the Continent.

Meeting them changed her life. Mathiassen was preparing an archaeological reconnaissance trip to Greenland and invited Freddy to join him. What was to last six weeks lasted six months and Freddy found her calling. She wrote in Voyage to Greenland. But more important, it was a journey into a new life, and for me a new way of looking at the world.

Having once set foot in Greenland. So into the male-dominated discipline of American anthropology came Freddy in and until the end of her formal field research in Alaska in , she was quite often the pioneer archaeologist in a region, and certainly, the pioneer female archaeologist. As a woman, she was able to interview Native women and record their stories, a privilege seldom available to male anthropologists at that time.

In Kaj Birket-Smith, the Danish anthropologist whom she had met in Copenhagen, was to co-lead an expedition, with Freddy, to Prince William Sound yet illness prevented him from doing so at the last minute. With support from the University Museum in Philadelphia, Freddy came north without him, conducting her first independent archaeological field expedition.

She was 24 years old. It was a question and the search for its answer that brought her to Cook Inlet. Alan Boraas, professor of anthropology, Kenai Peninsula College, Soldotna, states that Freddy was one of the first problem-oriented archaeologists. And, document it well with photographs. Many publications are beautifully illustrated with her images. Because Freddy felt strongly that all people should be able to benefit from her Alaskan photographs, taken between and , she willed them to the Alaska State Library in Juneau.

Co-author Klein spent eight months with Freddy at Bryn Mawr College, compiling, chronologically organizing, labeling, and preserving, in archival materials, photographs. From Prince William Sound Freddy traveled to Anchorage where, during the summers of , , and , she surveyed the shores of Cook Inlet in a little gas boat, the Dime , run by Jack Fields, a Seldovian, who boated her to many archaeological sites, particularly in Kachemak Bay.

Her family provided some financial support and her brother, Wallace, and mother, Grace, joined her as field assistants for several years in Kachemak Bay and Prince William Sound. Tragically, her father died unexpectedly in September , as Freddy learned when returning from Alaska to Pennsylvania. After obtaining her PhD at Columbia in , Freddy returned to Bryn Mawr and for the next 40 years taught anthropology classes.

From she co-created and chaired the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, which became the Department of Anthropology in Mandatory retirement in ended her formal teaching career but not her passions for learning, writing, exploring.

Her zest for life persisted throughout her 98 years. In she joined the military, hoping for an overseas appointment. Disappointingly, she was posted to Naval Intelligence in Washington, D.

She taught during the academic year and, as often as possible, spent summers in the field. Her professional field work in Alaska, albeit sporadic, spanned to While participating in field research in Arizona, she also developed a passion for Southwest peoples and their cultures. After mandatory retirement from BMC in , Freddy continued learning and teaching through her writings and her lectures.

When traveling, she often sought knowledge of the indigenous peoples of her destination. Her travels brought her back to Yukon Island in Kachemak Bay 48 years after her initial visit and to Greenland and Denmark 50 years after her initial visits there.

When interviewed by co-author Klein in , Dr. Although her passion for the arctic lured her away from Bryn Mawr, she resided there from shortly after her birth in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in When an apartment became available in Haverford, near Bryn Mawr, Freddy moved in and resided there until her death on October 4, , the day after her 98 th birthday.

She died in her sleep at home in her apartment. Before she went to bed, she told her friend and fellow anthropologist, Dr. Marie-Francoise Guedon, that she wanted to write a book about the many animals she knew and loved. Freddy was a member of several environmental organizations and practiced basic conservation in her life, such as carrying groceries in canvas tote bags long before such bags were in vogue.

When 89 years old, she was still swimming numerous times a week and ate three full meals a day, preferably one as a picnic, if nothing more than sitting on a bench outside of the anthropology building on campus, enjoying sunshine, bird song, and company. She was compelled to convert her abundant field notes and photographs into publications, to preserve the stories of the cultures she had studied. Marie-Francoise Guedon, fellow anthropologist, former field collaborator, and executor of her estate, was tasked with maintaining the press and issuing books, when possible.

The next publication, which Freddy and Marie-Francoise were writing at the time of her death, was to be about the Ahtna people of Copper Center.

The awards and honors bestowed upon Freddy are too many to recount. Most meaningful to her were those from the Native Alaskans with whom she had worked. During her studies in Yakutat in and the early s, she was invited and greatly honored to share the Tlingit name of Mrs. Like her father, Freddy had an innate talent for languages and in , she tape recorded songs of the Yakutat people, inadvertently stimulating renewed interest and pride in Tlingit music.

When she returned to Yakutat in , she composed a song for the people in their language. It was remembered and sung at a potlatch 32 years later which Freddy attended as a revered elder and guest. Awards from her colleagues were also important.

She served many positions, including that of president, with the American Anthropological Association, was one of the first Fellows of the Arctic Institute of North America, and was selected in to be one of the first female inductees into the National Academy of Sciences, along with Margaret Meade. Her active inquiring mind, developed and nurtured in an academic environment with strong family support, appears to have sustained this vital woman who contributed so very much to the world of anthropology, most especially, to Alaskan anthropology.

Like her parents, she willed her remains to science. By Freddy had published more than papers and book reviews. The following publications provide a rough timeline of her travels and archaeological or ethnological field research in Alaska. University of Wisconsin Press, c A Personal Initiation into Anthropology.

Norton and Company, Inc. For the Alaska Humanities Forum, Anchorage. Mary Epperson inspired and built the arts community in Homer, Alaska and the southern Kenai Peninsula. She was also a most influential piano teacher who for approximately sixty years gave piano lessons to children and adults.

Students learned to play the piano and to love music and were mentored to bring out all their abilities. Epperson was deeply interested in lifetime learning opportunities, serving on the Campus Advisory Board of the Kachemak Bay Campus, Kenai Peninsula College, for thirty years, many as chair. She campaigned extensively for campus facilities to be located in Homer and lobbied for many of the certificate, degree programs and services now offered. Board of Regents Meritorious Service Award summarized her successful efforts: Her many honors include: Epperson was a loving, modest, humble and generous woman whose profound personal and community influence shaped Homer, its institutions and its people.

She loved music, the arts and life-long learning and had a passion to share this love with others. She was the inspiration for, and the architect of the arts community of Homer and the southern Kenai Peninsula. Perhaps most widely known as an outstanding piano teacher, she gave private lessons to generations of children, and adults, over a sixty-year teaching career.

After completing high school she worked as a bookkeeper and during the early WW II years she worked in a factory where she met Jack Epperson, the man she married in Jack decided the family should move to Alaska which they did with their two children, Terry and Dean, in We do know of one major influence in her early years: Recognizing that she had this talent, he insisted that she be given piano lessons, starting at an early age.

The early years in Alaska were difficult. They first filed for a homestead in Happy Valley, located between Ninilchik and Anchor Point, living in a one-room cabin without running water, electricity, indoor plumbing or a piano which had been left in Los Angeles. Also, it was a two-mile walk to the road where her daughter could catch the school bus. Deciding that it would be too difficult to spend another winter in that cabin they filed for a new homesite in Ninilchik, choosing a site opposite the school.

Again, the cabin Jack built lacked running water and indoor plumbing, but it did have electricity and the school had a piano. She also became a substitute teacher and taught singing and gave accordion and guitar lessons. They next homesteaded at a site outside of Anchor Point, now known as Epperson Knob, where Jack built their cabin and started a cattle ranch. While this cabin was larger, there was no road to it. She retired in and devoted full time to teaching piano, volunteering and advancing the arts and education.

She acquired a small building in the downtown area, fixed it up to be her music studio and named it Etude Studio. A newcomer to the Etude Studio would immediately be quizzed by Epperson to ascertain what musical instruments he or she played in the hopes of recruiting new talent for the Kenai Peninsula Orchestra. Epperson founded and organized the Kenai Peninsula Orchestra, serving as president of the board and for thirty years was its bookkeeper.

In , she was one of the primary founding trustees of the Homer Community Foundation. She sold tickets every summer in support of the Pier One theatre productions. In addition to her love of the arts, Epperson was deeply interested in opportunities for securing life-long learning opportunities and higher education.

Her daughter observed that once she learned something Epperson felt compelled to share it with others. This endowed fund was successfully funded and awarded its first three scholarships in What were the personality traits, leadership and teaching skills this remarkable woman possessed to enable a former homesteader and music lover to make such lasting impacts on her community and so many individuals?

First off, she loved people and in turn people loved her, sensing a genuine concern. She was generous, kind, very humble, modest and did not need, and did not take, credit for her accomplishments. She was determined, would follow through and knew how to connect and collaborate with others. As an intuitive person, she was always able to find, and convince, an appropriate person to do something.

When that certain something was completed she would say: She was a natural teacher, using patience and praise, and knowing when and how to give extra attention to a young person when needed, whether pertaining to life or a music lesson.

As one former student commented: Greatness is Not Born. Tony Lewis and Clark Fair. While women born during her time were limited in the roles they could hold in the church, Green pursued opportunities throughout her life that allowed her to shatter glass ceilings.

Green obtained multiple college degrees and taught school in Colorado before moving to Alaska. Green sought assignments within the Presbyterian Church that allowed her to positively influence the policies of the church.

In , Green became a Commissioned Church worker, the only Presbyterian Church position available for a single woman in Alaska. After arriving in Alaska, Green quickly fell in love with the state and the people and joined the ranks of leadership in the Presbyterian community where she advocated for social justice and peace. In , Green became the first women to be ordained as a female Presbyterian minister in Alaska.

Green became the first female moderator for the Synod of Alaska-Northwest. Lawrence Island and the Anchor Christian Ministries did much to advance the role of women, minorities and Alaska Natives in the church and in Alaska. After retiring, Green has continued to serve in volunteer roles of both the Korean and Alaska Native Presbyterian Congregations in Anchorage.

Today, Green lives in the Anchorage Pioneer Home. The celebration recognized Green, who served as a religious leader, social advocate, gifted educator, courageous pioneer, and world traveler. In honor of her birthday, Reverend Karns reported that Green was made an honoree moderator for the annual Yukon Presbytery meeting in October Green, who was named after her mother , was born on July 21, , in Scott City, Kansas.

Green was born two months early with club feet and only weighing four pounds. Her family had difficulty finding formula she could eat and Green was not expected to live. Green had two aunts she loved dearly. Both worked at Sheldon Jackson School between the years of and Green recalls their stories about Alaska which ignited her desire to come to Alaska.

Green had six siblings, two born with cerebral palsy. Green helped care for them before leaving home and it helped shape the person she is today. Green grew up with little money and a big family. A friend named Mr. Boggs who had been a member of her family church paid for Green to go to college and seminary. Green admitted to Mr. Boggs that her family lacked the funds to pay for her attendance. The family friend immediately paid for college for Green.

Women at the time could not become ministers but they could be missionaries, so Green signed up and became a missionary. After obtaining her history degree in Secondary Education, Green taught 7 th and 8 th grade in Marble, Colorado, where quarries, owned by a company in Vermont, mined the stone for statutes, notably the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the Lincoln Memorial, and sent it to Washington, DC. When the Republicans came into power under Eisenhower, marble was no longer obtained through the Vermont Democrat company, so the mine closed and Green was out of a job.

That same year a gold mine reopened in Dunton, Colorado creating a need for a school teacher, so Green moved to teach grades Alice was again unemployed. Green headed to graduate school.

Shortly after, Green took her first assignment with the church in Maine, becoming a Sunday School Missionary. Then Green moved to Savoonga, Alaska in Aside from a one year furlough, Green stayed in Savoonga until She quickly made Savoonga home.

The Synod, an advisory council, enabled Green to practice her skills and provide guidance and advice to leadership within the region. Green reported that Reverend G. She was the only woman in her group that went into the ministry.

The other seven were men. In July, , when traveling to Savoonga, Green met her dear friend, Norma Hoyt, who was traveling from Seattle to Anchorage via the same steamboat out of Seward as Green. Green reported that she had planned to stay with a local minister, however, he was out of town when she arrived.

Norma Hoyt invited Green to stay with her until the local minister returned to town, thus forging a 44 year friendship. From to , Alice Green reported that she often traveled for leisure and vacation, managing to go to six continents with her friend, Norma Hoyt. Green and her friend Norma Hoyt were scheduled to go to Iraq, however, they cancelled the trip due to a cholera outbreak.

Going to Iraq would have prevented them from traveling to some of the other destinations on their list of places to see because of concern about the spread of the disease. Green reported that Hungary offered the best food, wholesome and homemade, but Nepal was her favorite destination because they offered active programs for travelers. She enjoyed visiting the many clinics in the countryside in Nepal just outside Katmandu. Green claims she took that trip so that she could see the people of remote locations, comparing it to Savoonga which was also remote.

Restricted by practice limitations of the church, Green served as a Presbyterian missionary from to in one of the most remote Alaskan villages, Savoonga on St.

Lawrence Island, an island about the size of Connecticut in the Bering Sea approximately 50 miles from Siberia. When Green arrived in Savoonga, she moved into a tiny home that was a mere 15 x 16 feet in size. It was too small to hold her trunk, so she stored her trunk in the attic at the local school. At the time there was no church so she held services at the local school until the school burned down in , when services were held in homes.

Shortly after arriving in Savoonga, Green helped the community manage the construction of a church using volunteer labor. The church is still there and in use after over 70 years. When Green is asked about her role in the construction, she quickly gives all credit to the local people of Savoonga, downplaying her role in the effort. She always had her services and hymns translated into Siberian Yupik for the local residents.

She made people comfortable; she loved the people of Savoonga and they knew that. The key to her success while living there was ensuring she treated people with respect.

When asked if it was hard living in Savoonga, away from all of the luxuries of the big cities, Green said: She loved the place and all of the people there. She never missed the city, and since she traveled, she was able to see amazing people and go amazing places while doing her work. Green pointed out that many of them had contracted TB carving ivory and had been institutionalized for treatment. Land was becoming expensive. Faith Church had a mission outreach program in the Nunaka Valley area that originally operated out of homes, but eventually became Immanuel Presbyterian Church.

The Korean Church moved into the Spenard space when Trinity bought property on Huffman Road so there was a south side Presbyterian presence. These changes drove down costs and allowed the churches to benefit from shared administrative duties.

From to Green attended national meetings twice a year for the Presbyterian Church, voting on budgets and opening or closing new church sites across the country. In , Green accepted an interim pastor position in Ketchikan where she served for a year.

In , when the rules changed to allow women to be ordained, the Savoonga church following church protocol called Green to be their pastor. Green became the first woman ordained in Alaska as a Presbyterian minister. After being ordained, Green returned to Savoonga and served from to In , Green was required to retire from service with the Presbyterian Church because she reached age She traveled to meetings and conferences throughout the Lower 48, took minutes for the local churches and continued to remain active in the church as a volunteer after her forced retirement.

Her involvement in three churches: Lawrence Island and Anchor Christian Ministries significantly advanced the role of women and Alaska Natives in the church. Green often attended and traveled to other churches. She explains that Green ministers to all people and that there is never a wrong thing to say.

Markson, Green is not critical, but she is stubborn. While serving in Anchorage, Green also performed weddings, often for the people from St. As a ruling elder, Alice served at every judicial level of the church. Her knowledge of the people helped others better meet the needs of culturally diverse congregations. The mission helped bring diverse cultures and races together for fellowship and prayer advocacy for peace and justice worldwide.

When asked what drove her to advocate for these two particular groups, she noted many Alaska Natives were moving to Anchorage from the villages. There has to be someone bigger than ourselves to help things move along the way they should. Allah, God, whatever that might be. Green and her friend Norma Hoyt took their final trip together in , when they went to Antarctica, just months before her friend died. Green always stopped at hospitals and mission stations along the way. She collected Alaskan books exclusively and had an amazing collection which she eventually sold and donated to local libraries and museums.

Much of her collection can be found in the Nome library. Green taught Bible study at Trinity Presbyterian in Anchorage until , when she turned 98 and her vision started to fail her. Her advice is to get the education that you need to follow your dreams and just do it. She listened to both sides of every story and often stayed as neutral as she could, although she did occasionally have to pick sides and provide advice over issues.

When needing to do so, she sought wisdom through prayer. When asked about meeting the glass ceiling, Green pointed out that when she arrived in Savoonga there was no formal building for people to meet, but the community was organized. She became very much a part of the community and the community became a part of her. For fun, Green plays double deck pinochle with friends on Sunday afternoons, she attends Bible studies on Wednesdays, since her eyesight has started to fail she is now an avid audio book reader and she likes to take walks.

She loves reading non-fiction and is currently listening to a book on tape of a biography about the 2 nd George Bush. Green reports her favorite book of all time is the Bible. Her favorite verse is a most famous bible verse, John 3: It is fitting that Green is being honored for her achievements, social rights activism, religious and educational leadership and long dedication to Alaska and the Presbyterian Church. Friend and teacher from Savoonga Personal conversations and written communication.

Life long-friend who grew up in Savoonga. Green was her pastor Personal conversations and written communication. Green is one of the Pioneers in the book: We Alaskans, Stories of people who helped build the. Lorrie Horning is best known as the founder of Alaska Junior Theater which was just one year after she and her family, two young boys and husband, moved to Anchorage.

It continues to thrive serving an audience of nearly a million parents and students over time. Born and raised in Vancouver, Washington, the oldest of four children she married Morris Horning, who she had known since they were year old neighbors. She began her teaching career in Bellevue, Washington. Horning has created other, non-theater related entities. This program operated out of Providence Hospital and Alaska Humana Hospital, making infant seat restraints readily and inexpensively available to newborns.

Horning developed the program The Wish List, a page booklet containing the wishes and specific needs of over 70 Anchorage non-profit organizations. It continued to be published for 13 years. The awards she has received are many and include: Lorrie Horning is best known as the founder of Alaska Junior Theater , a private, non-profit organization presenting professional theater arts from around the word to young audiences and families in Anchorage and around the state.

The Horning family lived in Seattle for about ten years and during that time participated in the Seattle Junior Programs, one of them a theater program that the entire family could attend and enjoy. Horning served on the board for two years and is where the Alaska Junior Theater idea came from. Born and raised in Vancouver, Washington, the oldest of four children. She and her future husband attended St. Then, she went on to attend Providence Academy in Vancouver, a Catholic girls high school where she was the Sodality President.

She continued her leadership at Marylhurst University in Oregon serving first as the student body treasurer and then student body president. She taught elementary education in Bellevue, Washington and again in Seattle, Washington. Many people talk about marrying their high school sweetheart. They have known one another since they were year-old neighbors, attended the same elementary school but did separate after the eight grade.

They went to separate colleges and married each other June 26, a year after graduating. They have two children, Kevin, born in New York City, , while Morris completed a medical internship at Montefiore Hospital and Shawn was born in San Francisco while his father served in the U. They decided they would have another adventure and planned to stay for two years. The adventure took them and their sons to 13 countries with a four-month residence in Wales. Several of the months included the parents of both Lorrie and Morris traveling with them, all eight in two camper vans.

During this time the boys were home schooled with a brief time attending school in Wales. After arriving in Anchorage, Horning missed the presentation of theater arts for children, so she and five friends who were also parents formed the Alaska Junior Theater. She and her husband continue to serve as fund raisers, consultants, and at times help with the school time performances.

Horning has created other, non-theater related entities as well. This program operated out of Providence Hospital and Alaska Humana Hospital, making infant seat restraints readily and inexpensively available for newborns to new parents, military parents, those new to Anchorage as well as new grandparents with visiting grandchildren. Another program Horning developed was The Wish List , a page booklet containing the wishes and specific needs of over 70 Anchorage non-profit organizations.

During a time long before cell phones, Horning created a Student Emergency Wallet Card in , listing emergency and call for help numbers. Working with the Anchorage School District the cards were distributed to 11 junior and senior high schools in Anchorage. They also enjoyed meeting the Carters in Plains, Georgia. For more than fifty years, Mary Lou King has followed her love of nature, education, and her community to benefit those around her.

She is known for opening the natural world of Juneau to countless generations of Juneau residents and tourists through her trails work and publications. King is a tireless conservationist whose advocacy made a difference in the preservation of and public access to Southeast Alaska. Finally, she is an educator who helped to establish Sea Week in Juneau and supported it to becoming the field experience for three generations of Juneau students in every grade and classroom in the elementary schools, then guided the expansion of Sea Week to a statewide program for the State of Alaska.

King is one of those rare individuals who have the vision and clarity to know what is needed by a community and the determination and energy to carry that through to fruition. In the early s, she worked with the City Planning Department and identified the public access points to beaches, establishing trails and signage at beach access spots throughout the Borough.

King led multiple Juneau conservation societies and published the definitive Juneau trail guide, 90 Short Walks Around Juneau , first printed in and now in its fourth printing. She was an advocate for countering a plan that would have resulted in a sale of timber of much of the island, which is now a national treasure. She grew up in the woods of Southern Oregon and was conscious early on about what can be done to beautify outdoor spaces.

Thus started her passion for bringing locally relevant education to Alaskan students. Jim worked as a waterfowl biologist all over the state for 30 years. King believes her finest accomplishments are her children: Hearthside Bookstore in Juneau reports that they sell more copies of this book each year than any other single book.

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