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By a few white Australian writers started to express concern for the fate of the native inhabitants, including the lllawarra and South Coast Aboriginal people. Over the following thirty years a number of investigators - including Reverend William Ridley, R.

Howitt, John Brown, and Archibald Campbell - went about collecting material and reminiscences of the local Aborigines, realising that with the deaths of the older natives much of the local culture would be lost forever as it was no longer being passed from generation to generation. This period also saw significant movement not necessarily voluntary by the local Aboriginal people away from traditional lands - north to Sydney and La Perouse, and south to areas such as Wreck Bay and Wallaga Lake.

It also saw the introduction of the Aborigines Protection Board in , and whilst the records of this body now supply a significant amount of information on the local people, its operation greatly contributed to their continued oppression, belittlement, and destruction. The iniquities of the Aboriginal Protection Board and its policies during the period will not be discussed in detail within this compilation, though numerous references will be given and samples of their records reproduced.

King Mickey was born at Port Stephens about , arrived in lllawarra around , and died in Queen Rosie, his wife, died in Numerous photographs of King Mickey exist from the s, during which period he was recognized by whites as the leader of the surviving lllawarra Aborigines.

Howitt Papers [s - s] A. Howitt Papers - Howitt was an anthropologist who worked in the Bega Valley and other areas of the far South Coast. He was accepted by the local Aborigines and recorded many of their sacred ceremonies. Blankets for Shoalhaven Aborigines 8 April Approximately blankets are distributed to Aborigines at Shoalhaven on this day. The Blacks of Shoalhaven Part I On the 8th April, ,1was present at a distribution of blankets, at Terara, amongst the Aborigines and half-castes resident in the district of Shoalhaven.

The blankets were distributed by the Clerk of Petty Sessions. Men, women, and children of every hue or shade of colour appeared as claimants - some of them pure, or "full blooded blacks", others, the offspring of "blacks" and "whites", and others, again, the progeny of whites and half-castes.

From the hobbling crone to the lisping baby - from the stalwart man to the puny boy all were there; and most of them eager applicants for blankets; but children under a year old did not count or receive any. In all blankets were distributed; but it was expected there would be fresh applicants on the following day - bringing up the number to about - which was that of the previous year.

But the race has very much diminished during the last ten years. I was informed that the total number of blankets distributed for the same district, in , was about For good, or for evil, the stock is rapidly dying out; and in twenty years there will scarcely be one genuine Aboriginal left within it.

Rum and disease are doing their work but too surely. The entire assembly were barefooted; and little could be said in favour of the "looks" of the great majority of them. The men were not beauties - from "Limping Jabba" down to "Broken-nose Tom". Most of the young men and nearly all the children were fat and sleek. There was one girl among the half-castes of pleasing features and graceful form; and a black "gin" retained something of the attractions for which she was once distinguished.

Almost every woman and some of the young girls at the age even of 14 were said to be "married". Some of them exhibited their husbands, or were exhibited by the husbands; others had left their husbands "at home". Tobacco pipes adorned the mouths of many of the matrons, and sun-bonnets covered the heads of the young ladies.

The former were vehement if not eloquent, in pressing their claims upon the Clerk of Petty Sessions, and enumerated with great volubility the names of their children for whom they required blankets; but the latter were moderate even to diffidence when preferring their applications; and the contrast between their soft, low voices and the harsh tones of their elders, was very marked. A few years ago a party of blacks, after obtaining their blankets at Ulladulla, took boat and pulled many miles along the coast.

They then landed at Crookhaven, crossed to Terara, and on the next day got a second set of blankets there. Captain Cook, a weatherbeaten tough old vagabond, stood by the Government officer, introduced his "friends", and affected to corroborate or correct their statements, as the case might require, until a good number of them had obtained their blankets, when he began to fear that the bales which contained them would be exhausted before he had secured his own; he then "struck work", insisted upon the blanket being given to him before he would proceed further, and on getting it, wrapped it about his body, to make sure of the prize.

His "Peggy" was dead since the last distribution, and her successor, "Jenny Daddy", lay in the "bush", from an injury in her spine. It was considered unkind to make any inquiries as to the cause of either calamity.

Some of the men were named after their occupations - "Fisherman Johnny", and "Carpenter Jack", for instance; others were distinguished by some feature in their personal appearance or character"Bill Stupid", "Broken-nose Tom", and "Cock-eye", but most of them were called after the places where they usually resided - "Barrier Jacky", and "Broughton Creek Dick", etc.

A half-caste named "George" was considered the Chief man of all the blacks present, and his daughter "Julia" complained that she had been "kept waiting for her blanket, though she ought to have been served first".

On receiving their blankets the men handed them over to the women who accompanied them, and these made them up into bundles, which they carried away upon their backs - a chubby child, or other package, peering above - and their lazy lords stalking alongside, listless and empty-handed. Viewed as a whole, it was a melancholy picture of an expiring race, and forced the question - Has the white man of this Colony done his duty by these poor creatures, whose land and country he.

And is it not time that the 14th clause in the Royal instructions to every Governor of New South Wales was either obeyed, or omitted altogether: They include reminiscences by Alexander Berry and a Mr Lovegrove. The two articles were subsequently reprinted in the Shoalhaven NewsVne following week 23 December The Alexander Berry material contained in these articles is a re-telling of his Reminiscences see under , though with a number of major differences.

Both articles are reprinted below:. I now propose to enlarge the sketch, by depicting the race as they lived and died in the earlier days of the Colony, and I am enabled to do so, at two interesting periods of their and its history, through the courtesy of friends, who knew them well, and took a generous interest in them - Mr Alexander Berry, and Mr Lovegrove, of Shoalhaven.

The Papers which those gentlemen have kindly handed to me are so full, clear, and graphic, that I shall leave them to tell their tale, with scarcely a word of alteration: When I made a settlement at Coolangatta, in , they were comparatively numerous, and were said to be very ferocious.

I was informed that they had recently driven away a number of sawyers or wood-cutters, and my old friend, the late James Norton, told me that they would eat me. I had, however, served a kind of apprenticeship to the management of savages in New Zealand, and I was always on good terms with those of the settlement. Indeed, I found them very useful.

It is true, for a year of two, they used to steal maize and potatoes - but they were not half so destructive as the cockatoos, who committed their depredations in the most systematic manner.

It was several weeks from my first arrival at Shoalhaven, before any of the natives ventured to show themselves. At length, about twenty of them encamped in my neighbourhood, and I availed myself of the opportunity to have a friendly talk with them.

They were accompanied by two Chiefs, one of them was the reputed Chief of Numba or Shoalhaven, and the other of Jervis Bay. The name of the former was Wagin, of the latter Yager. The master of the cutter in which I came down from Sydney, and his mate, had been both drowned in attempting to enter the Shoalhaven River in a small boat.

I therefore determined to avail myself. Wagin and Yager to assist me in navigating the vessel back. They readily agreed to my proposal that they should accompany me to Sydney, where I would give to each of them a suit of clothes, and a brass plate, thus constituting Wagin King of Shoalhaven, and Yager King of Jervis Bay. Governor Macquarie had adopted this system, and had found it beneficial, but he was very tenacious of his prerogative, and would not allow any person, save himself, to convert chiefs into Kings.

Now, however, he had been relieved by Sir Thomas Brisbane, and I assumed the liberty of making Kings direct, rather than solicit the Governor to provide the brass plate. The crew of the cutter, bound to Sydney, consisted of myself, the two Chiefs, a white man, whom Mr Throsby the elder had sent from Berrima to ascertain how I was succeeding in my enterprise at Coolangatta, and who could steer a boat, and Charcoal, a Sydney native, whom I had brought down as an interpreter, and who could also steer.

For some days I was unable to leave Crookhaven, where the cutter lay, on account of foul winds, but one morning, when there was a calm, I determined to get out in some way.

Charcoal steered the vessel, and the white man, the two Chiefs, and myself pulled her out with sweeps. From some days there were light northerly winds, which retarded us considerably in spite of our efforts - to which the Chiefs contributed a fair share in working the cutter. At length, we saw a large vessel in the same plight - a boat from which eventually came off to us, and we went alongside.

The captain of this vessel proved to be an old friend, and he had three lady passengers on board, to whom he wished to exhibit the Chiefs, as specimens of our native Nobility, but as they were in the same costumes as that worn by Adam and Eve, before they partook of the forbidden fruit, I interposed and prevented their exhibiting themselves until they had obtained clothing. They then rolled themselves up like hedgehogs, and crouched behind the mast, until summoned to work.

Upon reaching Sydney the Kings procured the promised rewards, and on their return to Coolangatta, with their badge and broadcloth, another Chief, who had not presented himself previously, came to the Overseer, asserted that he was the real Chief of Shoalhaven, and claimed that he also should have a plate. The Overseer told him that if any prejudice had been done to him, it was his own fault in not having claimed in time, that I already had made Wagin the King, and could not make two Kings, but that I would make him a constable.

Fie refused to be a constable. Then the Overseer said that I would make him a settler. He had no objection to that, but stipulated it must be engraved on his plate, that he was a free settler, to distinguish him from a Government man.

The Natives never speak of their dead relatives. Having conciliated the Chiefs, I found the Natives very friendly and useful in many ways, especially in taking messages, and when I went a-boating on the river I always took a crew of Natives. On one occasion I went on a cruise up to Burrier. As we passed Boolong my crew requested me to pull ashore, to allow them to speak to their countrymen. This I did, and they learned that the Natives were hunting. On our return they called out and asked if their friends had been successful.

They had caught nothing and had eaten nothing all day. The friends of the murdered man had taken the body for burial, and on inquiry of the people at the hut, they told me that the deceased had breakfasted with them that morning, and that they left him there when they went to their work. Not satisfied with this, I went to examine the body.

It was on the mangrove flat, opposite the Island, called the Apple Orchard. It was bound up with sheets of bark for burial. The Natives readily unbound it. Having inspected the wounds, I said to the. They replied I was right, and went with me to examine the spot where the body was first discovered. With their acute eyes they observed, and pointed out to me, that there had been a struggle at the place.

They also showed me the stealthy tracks of a black coming to do the deed, and, after it was committed, the same tracks retreating. There was a Native Chief of the name of Brogher, who was the brother of Broughton, a great friend of mine.

One day Brogher and another Native went to two sawyers, and promised to show them a quantity of cedar trees, but they suddenly attacked the sawyers in the bush, and killed one of them. A constable was sent from Sydney, who apprehended the two blacks, took them on board one of my vessels, fastened them with a padlock to the chain cable, and then lay down to sleep. But Brogher noticed that he put the key in his pocket, and as soon as he was sound asleep, the Natives abstracted the key from his pocket, opened the padlock, and then swam ashore.

Unfortunately for themselves, however, they did not leave the district, but boasted of the feat they had committed, and they were again captured. On their arrival in Sydney they were put into a watch-house near Darling Harbour, and one night the companion of Brogher escaped, and endeavoured to cross the upper part of the harbour, but the tide was out, and he stuck in the mud, in which he was found dead next morning.

Poor Brogher smiled when he saw me. His defence was that the sawyers threatened him, and that he killed him in self-defence. He was kept long in gaol before the sentence was carried into effect.

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